Women In The Revolutionary War And The Civil War

1631 words - 7 pages

“The story of the war will never be fully or fairly written if the
Achievements of women in it are untold”
Frank Moore
Women of the War, 1867

When we hear the names, Paul Revere, Benjamin Franklin or George Washington, we can immediately identify these men as noble leaders and celebrated heroes who made extraordinary contributions during the fragile infancy of our country. These men and many others unselfishly risked their lives to fight for a united nation in both the Revolutionary and Civil Wars. However, do the names Philis Wheatley, Jenny Hodges or Sybil Ludington inspire the same recognition and admiration for their unprecedented sacrifices for the same “cause”? The answer may be “no” and, unfortunately, it would be expected.
History books tend to relegate major credit to “men” for our country’s freedom and independence. There is no disputing that key male figures, like George Washington or Thomas Jefferson, led masses of troops into battle and composed monumental doctrine that has changed our history forever. However, we must recognize that these were not one-gender wars and women played an extremely significant role in the war effort.
The impact of women in the Revolutionary War and Civil War have been underrated and consequently, inadequately represented in history textbooks compared to their male counterparts. These women exemplified “patriotic passion”, unwavering in their commitment to win America’s independence and create “one nation under God.”
History tends to applaud the heroics of men in war, but there are few examples that cite the courage women displayed. We need to be vigilant when we remember that women deliberately made the choice to fear for their personal safety and even risk their lives to share the burden of “freedom and justice for all”. These incredible women faced immense and unprecedented adversities resulting in steadfast fortitude and unwavering determination. In my opinion, these are the “unsung heroes” of war and the inspiration for this research paper.
Through the course of this paper and my analysis, I will first compare and briefly discuss the diverse roles of women in both the Revolutionary and Civil Wars. Second, I will focus on the valiant acts of patriotism and heroism selflessly executed by several women and examine the impact of their actions on the war. Finally, I will discuss how each of these wars subsequently altered the ideals and roles of woman forever. Ultimately, it is from these and other post-war modifications that womankind has evolved into the version of today.
The American Revolution and American Civil War significantly affected the lives of women and thereby forcing dramatic changes in their roles during war and following war. Some roles were traditional. For example, women took on the responsibilities of managing the household and in some rural communities, also supervised the farming and plantations while the men fought on the battlefields. These women were...

Find Another Essay On Women in the Revolutionary War and The Civil War

Southern Women In The Civil War

1622 words - 6 pages Women during the Civil War were forced into life-style changes which they had never dreamed they would have to endure. No one was spared from the devastation of the war, and many lives were changed forever. Women in the south were forced to take on the responsibilities of their husbands, carrying on the daily responsibilities of the farm or plantation. They maintained their homes and families while husbands and sons fought and died for their

Women and Their Role in the Civil War

3163 words - 13 pages origins not in businesses or the government but in the military. Since Joan of Arc first picked up a sword to fight for the French, women have disguised themselves as men in order to fight for their country and for their own personal independence. For example, during the Civil War (1860-1865), nearly three hundred women fought bravely in support of both the Northern and Southern cause (Weiser). Yet despite their bravery, three hundred seems

Women of the Civil War

1658 words - 7 pages soldier as any man around me, and as willing as any to fight valiantly and to the bitter end before yielding” Velazquez said (Women in Uniform in the Civil War). Loreta Velazquez’s role in the Confederate Army, the Forty’s say that “She fought valiantly, helping to beat off wave after wave of the attackers, in sleet, snow, and high winds of a bitter February (Military Women). Even though Loreta was a woman, she fought as hard as any man did

The Revolutionary War

847 words - 4 pages The Revolutionary War In the year of 1763, the Seven Years’ war ended with the British gaining all land on the North American continent east of the Mississippi River and significant debt accumulated during the war. Prior to the Seven Years’ War, the British had little interest in the affairs of the colonies and accepted soldiers and economic resources during the war (Foner, 2012). However, the British would look to the colonies as a source of

The American Revolutionary War

1032 words - 5 pages Colonies became the beginning of a new revolution that we now know as the United States of America. Many did not know that the American revolutionary war stemmed from the wars that Great Britain fought in the mid 1760’s. The American Revolutionary War began in 1763 during the Great Britain and France War with the Indians which came to be known as the French and Indian War (Stefoff 2001). America’s involvement began formally in 1760 when the

The Revolutionary War

1213 words - 5 pages slaughtered then retreated, this battle became the first battle of the Revolutionary War. There were many events that lead to the Revolutionary War, the first being The French and Indian War. The French and Indian war begin in 1756, this war was between England and France for colonial domination in North America. During this war the Colonist were forced by British to join in and defend Great Britain although they had an established trade relationship

The American Revolutionary War

1350 words - 5 pages The author delivers a compelling interpretation of the Revolutionary War with intricate details of the battles and descriptions of the individuals who were a part of this intriguing part of American history. Ferling does a great job breaking this historical event into four unique segments, which assist the reader in understanding various components of the war. The breakdowns define distinct areas of the Revolutionary War, which allows the

The Revolutionary War

1131 words - 5 pages The Revolutionary War is also known as the American Revolution and the U.S War of Independence. The war was between Britain and the 13 American colonies. When the British and colonists fought together in the seven years war against the French they were deeply in debt. Due to the debt the British began taxing the colonists to get out of debt. After being under British control the people of the 13 colonies of America became

The American Revolutionary War

2499 words - 10 pages In the year 1775 a war called the American Revolutionary war had started between the British and the American people living in the colonies like Massachusetts and New Hampshire. The colonies were separated into different areas and were all individually named and some of them were also bigger than the other. The people (Americans) living in these colonies were becoming annoyed by the British because they were taking all of the money they owned

The Revolutionary War - 2426 words

2426 words - 10 pages problems were about to be solved at the Battle of Yorktown. The Battle of Yorktown was the final battle of the Revolutionary War. General Cornwallis and his troop from Britain were tired in the southern area of the United States. Cornwallis brought his troop to Yorktown,Virginia to rest. Yorktown is on a peninsula which is a piece of land surrounded by water on three sides. George Washington asked a friend named Haym Solomon to help raise money

The American Revolutionary War - 1601 words

1601 words - 6 pages The American Revolutionary War in 1775-1783 was a historic moment in American history as it signaled America’s stand for its freedom from the English monarchy and to retain the rights it has slowly developing upon their stay in the country. Many skirmishes and battles happened throughout the country and it may seem as if the Englishmen had the upper hand due to their superior naval and military capability that may help them win the war. It

Similar Essays

Women In The Civil War Essay

1832 words - 7 pages When you hear women in the civil war, what do you think? Some people think can that really be, women are not meant for war, all they are needed for is cooking and cleaning and taking care of their children. Well everyone who stereotypes women of that is wrong, because just like men women did have some part of the civil war. Although they may have not fought in the war, they did help with the recovery of the injured men so that they can go back

The Revolutionary Aftermath Of The Civil War

581 words - 2 pages The Revolutionary Aftermath of the Civil War Despite many hardships that remained from the antebellum state of the union, reconstruction was a socially and constitutionally revolutionary period. The attempts to deter black voters were greatly outweighed by the numbers of blacks voting, as well as the laws that were passed to protect the rights of American citizens, black and white alike. The years after the war saw a rise in the

Women In The Spanish Civil War

1041 words - 4 pages Z3422283 - Kerry TangZHSS3219 - Special Studies (History) II (Spanish Civil War)Primary Source AnalysisFyrth, Jim and Alexander, Sally, Women's Voices from the Spanish Civil War, Lawrence and Wishart, 2008. Word count (1047)When the Spanish Civil War broke out, within the first months, women were recruited into the Popular Front militias, and face uncertain circumstances. The position of women in Spain was a flashpoint of political conflict

Women Spies In The American Civil War

2273 words - 9 pages . According to Larry G. Eggleston, in Women in the Civil War, identified female spies were treated very differently by their communities after the war; some, like Rose O’Neale Greenhow and Olivia Floyd, were praised and received full military burials, while others like Elizabeth Van Lew, a Union spy from Richmond, Virginia, were regarded as traitors (85-90). Furthermore, despite President Ulysses S. Grant’s recommendation Elizabeth Van Lew was