Women’s Endurance In The 1960’s Essay

1805 words - 7 pages

What was the USA like for all of those women, who wanted the right to do what men do before the Women’s Rights Movement? And what was it like after the movement? Women’s Rights Movement” is about “the self-conscious desire to achieve sexual equality” (Foner). The movement began in the 1960’s (Foner). Some of the leaders are Betty Friedan and John F. Kennedy (Foner). Lucy Stone and Sojourner Truth (Gelletey 40-41) are the other leaders who enlivened the movement. The followers are educated middle and upper-class women (Foner). The movement’s purpose was to grant women equal rights as men are given; such as getting paid the same amount as men doing the same job, equal respect in the family, and equal rights to work as men do. The literary piece “Why I Want A Wife” by Judy Brady is an article in a feminist magazine called Ms. The themes for this article are endurance and expectation for women in the 1960’s. The “Women’s Rights Movement’s” endurance is discussed by the article “Why I Want a Wife” by Judy Brady where the “Wife” is describe as the one enduring all the work in the house and at the same time going to work while the “husband” goes to school.
The ”Women Rights Movement” provided an opportunity for those who wanted sexual equality and equal rights to fight for it. The literary piece ”Why I Want A Wife” is about the “Wife” description as the one enduring all the work in the house, and at the same time going to work while the “husband” goes to school. The themes are endurance and expectation for women in the 1960’s. The following passage is from this literary piece, “My wife must arrange to lose time at work and not lose the job. It may mean a small cut in my wife’s income from time to time, but I guess I can tolerate that. Needless to say, my wife will arrange and pay for the care of the children while my wife is working” (Brady); in this, the husband’s expectation for his wife is ridiculously high. The expectation sounds more like that of slaves than wives. In the 1960’s, men’s expectation for their wives were like this. Men wanted a wife to take care of the children; in addition, they expected the women to work at the same time. “If, by chance, I find another person more suitable as a wife than the wife I already have, I want the liberty to replace my present wife with another one. Naturally, I will expect a fresh new life; my wife will take the children and be solely responsible for them so that I am left free” (Brady). The wife has to endure with taking and raising the children alone while the good-for-nothing husband went and married another woman. It is really not right that the endurance of the wife is high while the “husband” is having fun with his new wife. The Women Rights Movement has given Judy Brady an opportunity to express and contribute a purpose for women who experiences the endurance and expectation just like in the article.
The author expresses the wife’s hardship and in it is a purpose. Her...

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