Women's Perspectives Essay

1610 words - 6 pages

Annette Bair and Marilyn Friedman have opposing views on whether women have distinct moral perspectives. Like Friedman, I believe that women have no different moral perspectives than men. Some people, like Bair, think that women base their moral perspectives on merely trust and love and men base theirs on justice. Friedman points out that care and justice coincide . People use justice to decide what is appropriate in caring relationships and care is brought into account when determining what is just. Since these two moral perspectives correspond, gender does not distinguish different moral perspectives.
Women becoming philosophers most likely sparked the debate on whether genders have different moral perspectives. Like most professions, philosophy was mainly male dominated until the women’s suffrage movement came about. Women began writing their theories and perspectives on topics. Some believed that women based all their ethical perspectives based on care due to their previous experience as primary caretakers. Women like Held and Card were prominent philosophers of care ethics so it seemed plausible that there could be a debate on whether women based their ethical perspectives on care or not. What makes the debate on whether genders have different moral perspectives, interesting is that the debate is between two females. This is probably ideal because the whole debate really targets women and whether their ethical perspectives have broken out of the mold of their maternal duties after the onset of the revolution.
Friedman shows us that men do not just base their moral perspectives on justice and women do not just base theirs on care; they both coincide. It is almost required that they both exist together. In caring relationships, one becomes very vulnerable and they place a lot of trust in the other party. It is almost necessary that justice be served if one party is harmed in anyway . For example, in a relationship between a female and a male, if one party cheats on the other, it seems normal that punishment follows that. After all, both parties are emotionally vulnerable and when the one party cheated on the other; trust was broken and someone was emotionally hurt. Naturally, the hurt party would end the relationship as punishment towards the other party. If we did not have justice, there would be no punishment for those who beat their spouses or parents who abuse their children. Both men and women engage in this type of mindset, this is not exclusive to only one gender. Men have been wronged in a relationship before and so have women. Both genders tend to seek punishment for those who hurt them in their caring relationships. Justice protects us from the harmful effects that can come from caring for one person. Therefore, both men and women use justice when harmed in caring relationships; it is not gender dependent.
Contrary to Bier, justice does take into account care . When justice is served, one keeps in mind how to...

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