Women's Rights Essay

934 words - 4 pages

Women's Rights

Beginning in the mid-19th century, several generations of woman suffragesupporters lectured, wrote, marched and disobeyed many rules to change in the Constitution. parades, silence and hunger strikes where used to demonstrate the need for a change in the constitution. Women struggled for their rights ,and they struggled equally to black americans who desired voting rights as well(The Fifteenth Amendment., Susan Banfield pp.11-20).

Women had it difficult in the mid-1800s to early 1900s. There was a difference in the treatment of men and women. Married women were legally concidered a property of the man they married in the eyes of the law. Women were not allowed to vote. Married women had no property rights. Women were not allowed to enter professions such as medicine or law. Women had no means to gain an education since no college or university would accept women students.

Then the first Women's Rights Convention was held on July 19 and 20 in 1848(What's Right with America., Dwight Bohmach pp.261). The convention was convened as planned, and over the two-days of discussion, the Declaration of Sentiments and 12 resolutions received agreement endorsement, one by one, with a few amendments(http://www.nara.gov/education/teaching/woman/home.html). The only resolution that did not pass unanimously was the call for women's authorization. That women should be allowed to vote in elections was impossible to some. At the convention, debate over the woman's vote was the main concern.
Women's Rights Conventions were held on a regular basis from 1850 until the start of the Civil War. Some drew such large crowds that people had to be turned away for lack of meeting space. The women's rights movement of the late 19th century went on to address the wide range of issues talked about at the Seneca Falls Convention. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and women like Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, and Sojourner Truth, who were pioneer theorists, traveled the country lecturing and organizing for the next forty years. Winning the right to vote was the key issue, since the vote would provide the means to accomplish the other reforms. The campaign for woman's right to vote ran across continous opposition that it took 72 years for the women and their male supporters to win (When Hens Crow : the Woman's Rights Movements in Antebellum America pp.66).

During the Women's Rights Movement, women faced incredible obstacles to win the American civil right to vote, which was later won in 1920.There were some very important women involved in the Women's Right Movement. Esther Morris, who was the first woman to...

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