This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Women's Rights Movement Essay

819 words - 3 pages

Tuesday, November 2, 1920, the day women voted for the first time. The New York Times called it, “The greatest voting day in the city’s history.” It was a wonderful day for women all across the country. All of their hard work had finally paid off. The Women’s Rights Movement changed the way women were seen. Before the passage of the 19th Amendment, women in many states were not given the right to vote. The Women’s Rights movement was caused by many factors, greatly impacted the society of the early 1900s and changed American society forever.
Women were traditionally seen as the weaker sex – second-class citizens with a lower social status than men. A woman’s place was in the home. Men did the “heavier” labor, like plowing and hunting. Women were expected to take care of the children, make the meals, and do the housework. Maternity was the woman’s main role. The pressure of becoming a wife and mother kept some women from pursuing a college education or employment. In the United States, a man owned his wife and children. Once a woman got married, she lost her right to buy property, make a contract, or sue. Some states allowed married women to own land, only if they got permission from their husband. Women were seen as unintelligent; they were not given as many rights and political responsibilities as men. Views on women have changed drastically in the last century.
On July 13th, 1848, five friends met for tea. Their conversation led to the discussion of women’s rights. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, one of the women, poured out her dissatisfaction with the limitations placed on women. Hadn’t the American Revolution been fought to win freedom from oppression? What about women? They decided to do something about it. So, they planned a Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York. Stanton wrote a Declaration of Sentiments bringing attention to areas where women were treated unjustly. She modeled her Declaration of Sentiments after the Declaration of Independence. The first line of the Declaration of Sentiments and the Declaration of Independence only differed in two words, “and women”. At the convention, the women signed their names on the document. As one of the youngest signers to the Declaration of Sentiments, Charlotte Woodward became the only signer to see her dream come alive at the ballot box. To discourage the women from taking any further actions, newspapers across the country...

Find Another Essay On Women's Rights Movement

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and The Women's Rights Movement

1120 words - 4 pages cousin Gerrit Smith, and met refugee slaves, hiding at Smith’s place. While visiting London with Henry, who was attending an Anti-Slavery convention, Stanton met Lucretia Mott, a Quaker teacher who later was involved in Stanton’s Women’s Rights movement. “Denied her seat at the convention, as were all the women delegates, Mott discussed with Stanton the need for a convention on women's rights.” (“Women’s Rights”) The idea materialized when

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Women's Rights Movement

1160 words - 5 pages Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Women's Rights Movement Elizabeth Cady Stanton was an important element of the Women’s Rights Movement, but not many people know of her significance or contributions because she has been overshadowed by her long time associate and friend, Susan B. Anthony. However, I feel that she was a woman of great importance who was the driving force behind the 1848 Convention, played a leadership role in the women’s

Women's Rights and Abolitionism and how did the abolitionist movement aid women's rights advocates in their fight for suffrage?

1099 words - 4 pages Women's Rights and AbolitionismElizabeth Cady Stanton, a long-time advocate of women's rights, in a speech to the American Anti-Slavery Society said, "Yes, this is the only organization on God's footstool where the humanity of women is recognized, and these are the only men who have ever echoed back her cries for justice and equality..." The American Women's Rights movement was very much a product of the fight for abolition. Early leaders, such

Women's rights movement

826 words - 4 pages them out of higher-paid jobs. The government didn’t see this as unconstitutional. Women battled their way through life trying to make women equal to men. Women fought hard for the vote, equal opportunity for education, identical pay in the workplace and the chance to be more than just a housewife. The women’s rights movement was a time where women battled as hard as they could to become equal politically, socially, and economically. Women survived the toughest times when they faced harsh gender discrimination in the workplace and just because of the fact that they were women. Women knew they had to change this and how it would be achieved.

The Impact Of The American Revolution On The Women's Rights Movement

996 words - 4 pages The lack of participation of women in society in the United States before the women's rights movement in 1948 was remarkable. They did not participate in activities such as voting and fighting in wars. They also could not own property and "belonged" to their father until they were married, when they would then become the property of their husband. They were brought up to get married, often while they were still very young, then to become a good

The Movement for Women's Rights Inside The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

1633 words - 7 pages The Movement for Women's Rights Inside "The Yellow Wallpaper" by Charlotte Perkins Gilman Women have been mistreated, enchained and dominated by men for most part of the human history. Until the second half of the twentieth century, there was great inequality between the social and economic conditions of men and women (Pearson Education). The battle for women's emancipation, however, had started in 1848 by the first women's rights

Women's Rights Movement in the US

615 words - 2 pages Women rights Throughout the years of marriage and relationships there has been many changes towards the different roles that men and women play. Over this time though there are also things that have remained the same. The male female relationship has always had a type of “guidelines”. Over the past forty years these guidelines have become less and less followed.      Men and women’s attitudes towards each other are

Equity Within The Women's Rights Movement

1546 words - 7 pages The Civil Rights Movement was initiated during the 1953 to 1955 period during which the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on the Brown versus The Board of Education, ending legalized racial segregation. This organized civil movement represented inequities in both political and economic power against people of the African-American race and followed boycotts and other organized civil actions in Alabama and Louisiana. Representing the inequities and

Feminism: The Civil Rights Movement and Women's Rigths

2024 words - 8 pages Americans were not. At the same time the Civil Rights Movement was going on, the Women’s Liberation Movement was happening too. Women were gaining their rights along with African Americans. The fight was long and hard, but they won their rights. They were given their right to vote and the chance for better jobs. This time period became a battle not only between African Americans and White Americans but between the sexes. Trying to reach a sex

This essay is about the women's rights movement starting in 1948 all the way up to 1920. It gives an overview of the groups and people involved, and some major milestones they accomplished

516 words - 2 pages An Era of ReformWho would have known that what first started off as a hand-full of people at the Seneca Falls convention of 1848 would snowball into an all-out rebellion against the cruel and unjust treatment of women? The woman's rights movement owes its success to the brilliant techniques used by Women's rights activists such as Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, people who single-handedly brought the issue of Women's Rights from the

Women's Movement

611 words - 2 pages at home to fighting on battlefields. But their pleas for rights under the new democracy were disregarded. Women actually lost legal ground as a result of the new United States Constitution.Sixty years later, in July 1848, a small group of women set about to change their second-class status. They launched a peaceful revolution that has since encircled the globe-the Women's Rights Movement. At the convention they held in Seneca Falls, New York, 68

Similar Essays

The Women's Rights Movement Essay

1388 words - 6 pages The Women's Rights Movement was a significant crusade for women that began in the late nineteenth century and flourished throughout Europe and the United States for the rest of the twentieth century. Advocates for women's rights initiated this movement as they yearned for equality and equal participation and representation in society. Throughout all of history, the jobs of women ranged from housewives to factory workers, yet oppression by

Women's Rights Movement Essay

823 words - 4 pages The Women's rights movement is primarily concerned with making the political, social, and economic status of women equal to that of men while establishing safeguards against discrimination on the basis of gender. Feminists had only recently obtained their long fight for the right to vote, which they had hoped would help make an equal place for women in this society. The Women's rights movement has worked to reach their goals for women’s equality

Women's Rights Movement Essay

809 words - 4 pages was to change women’s roles in family households. Women were only able to take care of children, cook for the family, and clean the house. They couldn’t work outside the house and they wanted to change this by gaining equal rights. They originally wanted to end inequality in the workplace, wanted to get the vote, and just wanted to be equal to men. One of the largest protests of the women’s rights movement was when thousands of women marched

The Women's Rights Movement 1848 1920 Essay

1363 words - 5 pages , they did not have the national support that their adversary had. Yet, one thing that both groups had in common was their struggle to gain supporters and spread influence. During the early years of the 1880’s, the women in both groups had a very hard time attracting women, male politicians and voters to adapt the cause ("The Women's Rights Movement, 1848–1920."). In fact, organizations began popping up that opposed the women’s suffrage efforts