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World War Ii: Korematsu V. United States

605 words - 2 pages

The Supreme Court decision in Korematsu v. United States (December 1944) approved internment of Japanese Americans on a claim of " Military necessity"- the possibility of a Japanese attack on America's West Coast. The war power of congress and the executive to exclude those of Japanese ancestry from the west coast war area in which one's home is located is a far greater deprivation than constant confinement to the home from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. Nothing short of apprehension by the proper military authorities of the gravest imminent danger to the public safety can constitutionally justify either. We are dealing here with the case of imprisonment of a citizen in a concentration camp solely because of his ancestry, without evidence or inquiry concerning his loyalty and good disposition towards the United States. Our task would be simple, our duty clear, were this a case involving the imprisonment of a loyal citizen in a concentration camp because of racial prejudice.Korematsu was not excluded from the Military Area because of hostility to him or his race. He was excluded because we were at war with the Japanese Empire, because the properly constituted military authorities feared an invasion of our West Coast and felt constrained to take proper security measures, because they decided that the military urgency of the situation demanded that all citizens of Japanese ancestry be segregated from the West Coast temporarily, and finally, because Congress, reposing its confidence in this time of war in our military leaders as inevitably it must determined that they should have the power to do just this...We cannot by availing ourselves of the calm perspective of hindsight now say that at the time these actions were unjustified.The primary Source I have chosen is from Japanese-American Internment Camps during War World II. The...

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