Would A Democracy Succeed In Iraq?

525 words - 2 pages

To establish a democracy in Iraq would undo a heritage that has lasted hundreds of years. A democracy will not work in Iraq because the people in Iraq are too uneducated to elect a leader democratically. The Iraqi people are divided by three major ethnic groups that prevent a united democratic nation. The government that could unite Iraq is an aristocracy. An aristocracy will allow representatives of each region to voice the opinions of the people according to their needs. In an aristocracy the U.S. could be called upon if corruption was occurring. The representatives of each region as well as the U.S. would be able to make sure no on leader became too powerful.Major American dailies quote U.S. officials as saying privately that the meetings are looking at ways to accelerate the handover of power to Iraqis as one way to hasten the return of stability to the country. While the Iraqis should have the power to govern their country a democracy will only bring more chaos. Only a little more than fifty percent of males in Iraq can read, but that is a majority compared to the twenty five percent literacy rate in females. At the moment the people of Iraq are unable to make decisions that would best help them. A representative for the country may try to do good for the whole but he will be unable to because the people will not know what they truly want in their lives.The Sunni Kurds, Sunni Arabs, and the Shiites are divided into three regions of Iraq. These three regions are deeply...

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