Wuthering Heights         The Word Passion Is Defined In The Dictionary

1402 words - 6 pages

Wuthering Heights The word passion is defined in the dictionary as: "a very strong feeling, love and hate are passions. A violent anger; rage: He flew into a passion. It is also an intense love or sexual desire, a very strange liking of devotion." Put the word ruling in front, and you have a predominating; prevalent obsession. The novel Wuthering Heights, written by Emily Bronte, is a story about love, hate driven passions that are ruling in these characters lives. An obsession that leads these characters to be impulsive, vindictive, jealous and stupid. These ruling passions run and ruin the lives of all the characters in Wuthering Heights. There extreme passions have direct effects on the lives of others, which also carry into other generations.First of all, there is Heathcliff, a pitiful man driven by his ruling passion for Catherine and revenge. We first sympathize with the man when we see how Hindley mistreats him, and how he is turned down by Catherine for Edgar, and then a huge transformation takes place in our dear Heathcliff. His plan of vengeance begins to unfold and our feelings soon change. He leaves Wuthering Heights for years, deserting his love, and is determined to be successful and powerful in hopes to return suitable for Catherine. He comes back after three years, during which at the time nobody at the Heights or the Grange knew his whereabouts, and the first person he is eager to see is Catherine. He is now a changed person driven by his ruling passion to be someone else. He tells Catherine: "I heard of your marriage, Cathy, not long since; and, while waiting in the yard below, I meditated this plan: just to have one glimpse of your face, a stare of surprise, perhaps, and pretended pleasure; afterwards settle my score with Hindley; and then prevent the law by doing execution on myself. Your welcome has put these ideas out of my mind; but beware of meeting me with another aspect next time." Being upset with the news of Catherine's marriage to Edgar he tries to hurt them both by marring Edgar's sister, Isabella, even though he doesn't love her and even like her. Instead this one sided love affair, Heathcliff takes advantage of Isabella's feelings, to carry out his obsession for revenge. He ends up ruining her life and inheriting her fortune. In marrying her he accomplishes to parts of his plan, revenge and power. Was he just being selfish or blinded by his ruling passion to have her? The passing of time doesn't seem to dim his love or passion for Catherine, even after she dies he begs her ghost to haunt him, "Be with me always - take any form - drive me mad! Only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! It is unbearable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!" Most rational people who have loved someone who just died, wish that their souls rest in peace. He even arranges for their coffins to be open and facing each other. Nobody can think rationally when being ruled by a passion as...

Find Another Essay On Wuthering Heights         The word passion is defined in the dictionary

The Unwanted Villain in Wuthering Heights

1423 words - 6 pages of character was shown right from the beginning of the story when Lockwood the first person which arrives at Wuthering Heights explains he is the new tenant arriving to rent the property at Thrushgross Grange. Heathcliff’s unbearable attitude comes across right away “'I should not allow anyone to inconvenience me, if I could hinder it…” (Bronte, pg2). As one reads the story by Emily Bronte, one can determine the attitude of villainy from

The Dysfunctional Family in Brontë’s Wuthering Heights

2444 words - 10 pages The Dysfunctional Family in Brontë’s Wuthering Heights Creating a haven from the cruel outside world, families ideally provide protection and support for each of their members. In Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights, however, bitterness grows between the Earnshaws and the Lintons. Within these two families, siblings rival for power and parents fail to fulfill their roles as caregivers. The intertwining relationships of the Earnshaws and the

The Setting is Instrumental to the Understanding of Characters in Wuthering Heights

1200 words - 5 pages The setting of Wuthering Heights is instrumental to the readers understanding of the characters by conveying ideas of their attitudes and emotions which are tied to different places throughout the novel. The story is anchored and atmosphere is created by the setting. Wuthering Heights is set on the Yorkshire moors in the 18th century. The moors are the basic setting in which Bronte begins to establish the lonely atmosphere which

Wuthering Heights: Heathcliff is the best mate for Catherine

809 words - 3 pages In the novel Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte, it is obvious that Heathcliff makes a better partner for Catherine. Through Catherine and Heathcliff's childhood bond, the way they both express their emotions towards each other and the events that take place at Catherine's deathbed, it shows they have a very special bond that cannot easily be broken; therefore, Heathcliff makes a better match.Catherine and Heathcliff have had a connection since

The presentation of Mr. Lockwood in Wuthering Heights The novel,

751 words - 3 pages The presentation of Mr. Lockwood in Wuthering Heights The novel, Wuthering Heights, begins in the year 1801. The presentation of Mr. Lockwood in “Wuthering Heights” ======================================================= The novel, “Wuthering Heights”, begins in the year 1801, where we as readers are firstly introduced to the character Mr. Lockwood. Mr. Lockwood narrates the entire novel throughout, almost like an entry in his diary

The Character of Heathcliff in the novel, Wuthering Heights

531 words - 2 pages , Wuthering Heights. As a result, Heathcliff takes revenge by becoming the new owner and forcing Hindley's son, Hareton, to work long, hard hours in the fields. Another character that Heathcliff demonstrates his revenge on is Edgar Linton. Edgar married Catherine Hareton, who Heathcliff was madly in love with, and as a result, Heathcliff decides to take venegeance on Edgar by marrying his sister, Isabella.A second theme that is related to the

The Inner Self in The Awakening, Wuthering Heights, and Fences

2065 words - 8 pages The Inner Self in The Awakening, Wuthering Heights, and Fences        Does turmoil in people promote chaos in the world, or does chaos in the world create turmoil in people? To uncover a single answer to such a question is impossible. Therefore, those who seek a solution find themselves at a stalemate, and the query posed becomes rhetorical. Nevertheless, it initiates another inquiry worth thought and reflection: since the chaotic

"The Romantic elements in Wuthering Heights by Emily Bront"

2560 words - 10 pages wishing she could die to finally be free of her husband. It is the relationship of two protagonists that decides on that Wuthering Heights can be classified as Romantic novel: "Whatever we are to call the mutual passion of Catherine and Heathcliff, it has no societal aspect and neither seeks nor needs societal sanction. Romantic love has no fiercer representation in all of literature" (Bloom 1987: 6-7).This irresistible passion is also the source

The Victorian elements in Wuthering Heights by Emily Bront

3800 words - 15 pages reflecting her own life and experiences in both characters and action of Wuthering Heights. In fact, many characters in the novel grow up motherless, reflecting Emily's own childhood, as her mother died when Emily was three years old. Similarly, the vast majority of the novel takes place in two households, which probably is a reflection of author's own comfort at home as whenever she was away from home she grew homesick. Emily Brontё's

The Juxtaposition Between Nature and Man in Wuthering Heights

1281 words - 5 pages Set at the end of the eighteenth century, Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë is a mysterious book that maintains the reader on the edge of their seat as Brontë explores the dark side of love, revenge, and the juxtaposition between nature and man. But had Wuthering Heights been set in another time period, many situations-from Heathcliff’s arrival to the Earnshaw family to the union of Hareton and Cathy-may not have occurred. It should also be

The Chain of Love and Cruelty in Bronte's Wuthering Heights

1026 words - 4 pages Bronte, The author of the Wuthering Heights, expresses many themes and morals in her book. The one most important in the Wuthering Heights is the theme of love and cruelty. The main characters, Catherine and Heathcliff, show these actions time and time again. They occur because of the other, much like the yin and the yang. Love leads to cruelty and cruelty leads to love. In Wuthering Heights, there are two different types of love shown: platonic

Similar Essays

Heathcliff A Character Defined By His Past, In Wuthering Heights

1293 words - 5 pages Wuthering Heights is a novel whose main character is said to have a double significance. He is said to be both the dispossessed and the dispossessor, victim of class hatred and arch – exploiter, he simultaneously occupies the roles of working class outsider and brutal capitalist. Heathcliff has all these characteristics because of his experiences. He is a character moulded by his past. Heathcliff is a character defined by his sympathetic

Hindley Is Not The Central Character In Wuthering Heights

1190 words - 5 pages Hindley is not the central character in Wuthering Heights. Hindley is in the novel to enrich the plot. Although if he hadn't been in the novel certain major points wouldn't of taken place. Clearly Catherine is the central character in this novel.Catherine and Hindley are first mentioned when their father goes to Liverpool. At this point in the novel neither one takes on a more important role. After their father returns, he brings with him a

Catherine's Idol In The Novel Wuthering Heights

1446 words - 6 pages residence of the Earnshaw family. Wuthering Heights is an estate in Yorkshire, an old moor county in northern England. Throughout Catherine's life, whenever she was in trouble or had no will to go on, she would wish that she was a child again back at Wuthering Heights. She wishes that she could run, laugh, and play with her adopted brother and soul mate, Heathcliff, like she used to do when they were young and innocent. Wuthering Heights is clearly

The Presentation Of Childhood In "Wuthering Heights"

1777 words - 7 pages , well respect homes such as Wuthering Heights or Thrushcross Grange. The vocative “gypsy brat” (Ch.4) also carries pejorative connotations as young Heathcliff is condemned by religious folk and because he seemed to have no parents or a stable home, he was considered a ‘bastard’ child and a devil that “bred bad feeling in the house” Hindley personified jealousy and cruelty as a child towards Heathcliff for he felt the gypsy was “a usurper of