Children Immigrants Essay

2031 words - 8 pages

Children Immigrants

Immigrant children did not live an easy life in the nineteenth century. Most children were never educated. Italian children immigrants were rarely put through schooling. However, Eastern European Jewish immigrants looked at public schooling as their best way to help their children enhance their potential in life. Chicago, Detroit, and New York City had large populations of Jewish and Italian immigrants. The conditions of the children in all three cities were similar yet different with cities in which they lived in. Jewish and Italian immigrant children had to overcome many obstacles during their adjustment to American life in the nineteenth century.

Italian immigrants' children were cast into adult life at a very early age. Many of these children worked in their homes. 'They 'take out' work from sweatshops to their homes, where at times they work twelve, fourteen and sixteen hours a day finishing pants, or overalls, or children's jackets and knee pants for fifty or sixty cents a day'(The Italian girl in Chicago). An average day of work was usually like this with grueling twelve to sixteen hours. Italian children in the city of Chicago were likely to marry at a young age.

Italian children also seemed to question their father?s authority and their religion. ?Children of Italian parentage seem to repudiate the language, religion, and customs of their fathers more often than do the children of other foreign groups? (The second generation). It is prevalent that the Italian culture is carried in their children. These Italian children formed a generation gap. ?Though as rule they do not mix with their American schoolmates outside the classroom, they quickly acquire an Americanism which is in violent contrast to the customs of their parents? (The second generation). Italian children often found themselves caught between their culture and authority of the schools and their families. School had a way of causing Italian children to feel inferior to those who spoke English as their first language. Italians who could master English had enable them to break free from their Italian neighborhoods and venture into Chicago.

There were different expectations that pertained to boys and girls of Italian decent. Southern Italian girls in Chicago were guarded more strictly than the same Italian immigrant girls from the north side. Italian immigrants from southern Italy restricted their daughter?s freedom and guarded them from having a social life. Immigrants from the north were encouraging frequent contact and social recreation with boys.

Jewish immigrants prioritized education because they saw it as the best way to help their children enhance their potential in life. In the city of Chicago Jewish children started off in school. They had eight public schools in Chicago all for young Jewish people. ?Socialization of the immigrant children was the job of a handful of schools in the ghetto, where Jewish attendance reached 92-93%?...

Find Another Essay On Children Immigrants

Five Myths about Immigration - a summary of david cole's view

946 words - 4 pages Author David Cole explains in "Five Myths about Immigration" that people are misinformed about immigrants in America and blame them for all the problems in the American society. Cole comments that the "Native Americans", which have nothing to do with what we call Native Americans today, were labeled as "Know-Nothings" because they simply did not know anything about immigrants and prejudged immigrants who came into the country. The author quotes...

Immigrants and Immigration - Blessing or Burden?

1069 words - 4 pages Immigrants and Immigration - Blessing or Burden? Are immigrants a fortune of diversity, or a crushing burden? America has longed battled the issue about immigration. Today people in general have a very mixed feeling about the issue of immigration. Immigrants escaping from prosecution built the United States. Today, America firmly tries to solve many of our economical, political and social difficulties due to the burden of the thousand...

Americans are Immigrants!

989 words - 4 pages Americans are Immigrants!      “Everywhere immigrants have enriched and strengthened the fabric of American life,” was the words of former American president, John F. Kennedy (American Immigration: Quotes about Immigration). Immigrants have been in America for many years now. Today many people have different opinions about whether immigrants should be allowed into America freely, or if there should be more harsh...

Carribean immigrants in New York City

1815 words - 7 pages Have you ever watched the Eddie Murphey movie titled "Coming to America"? Well if you have you will have an insight into what life is like for immigrants settling in the United States, especially those from the Caribbean. Each year thousands and thousands of Caribbean immigrants come to the United States. Immigrants from the Caribbean experience a lot of changes in their lives when living in the United States. Many experience having to adapt to a...

English Should be the National Language

995 words - 4 pages From the time the Pilgrims landed in this great nation at Plymouth Rock, immigrants have been culturally diverse and have spoken many languages. When the Pilgrims arrived in the New World, they did not know how to communicate with the natives. Through intense study the natives learned the Pilgrims’ language. Even with the common language they were still a melting pot of different culture. Some would say that America has gotten over the language/...

Immigrants Should Be Forced to Learn and Speak English

2580 words - 10 pages The debate regarding whether or not immigrants should be forced to learn and speak English started as far back as 1754 (King, 1997, para.4) and continues to be debated currently. This issue is viewed differently by legal immigrants, illegal immigrants and American citizens. R. D. King (1997) wrote that the issue of immigrants learning to speak English dates back to 1753 with regards to German immigrants. In his article, Should English Be...

Illegal Immigration in the United States

930 words - 4 pages Illegal immigration in the US is and has been an ongoing battle for many years. According to legal-dictionary an illegal immigrant is define as an alien (non-citizen) who has entered the united sates without government permission or stayed beyond the termination date of a visa. There are many problems that occur such as overpopulation, raising crime rates and unemployment. Some Americans have issues with illegal immigration and some do not....

Immigration into the US

966 words - 4 pages All members of the current population of the United States are either immigrants or their descendants, concerns with immigrants and immigration policies have confronted the nation throughout history. This is due mostly because the nation promotes freedom and democracy. There are also unlimited economic opportunities to improve the material circumstances of peoples’ lives. While foreigners are coming into this country, the political view and...

Costs and contributions. The Wave From South of The Border

991 words - 4 pages Every year, hundreds of millions of people enter the US via land ports of entry, and the INS each year apprehends over 1.3 million aliens at or near the border. Over 90 percent of those apprehended near the border are Mexicans, and some who enter the US legally and illegally are carrying drugs into the US. This influx of illegal immigrants from south of the border has created quite a stir in many places. Is this good that people are coming to the...

The Effect of Illegal Immigration on the US Economy

963 words - 4 pages The United States of America, being a country founded by immigrants, is known all over the world as the land of great opportunities. People from all walks of life travelled across the globe, taking a chance to find a better life for them and their family. Over the years, the population of immigrants has grown immensely, resulting in the currently controversial issue of illegal immigration. Illegal immigrants are the people who have overstayed the...

Immigration Integration

1180 words - 5 pages In today’s America, all one has to do is look around to see the myriad of different kinds of people currently making up the population. Most of these people are descendants of immigrants, and quite a few may even be immigrants themselves. Understanding the role of immigrants in our society is important, especially when there are such differing views of whether they help or hurt us as a society. Integration programs have been put into place to...

Similar Essays

Should Children Of Immigrants Become Us Cititzens?

1823 words - 7 pages The issue this debate is covering is weather or not the United States should allow the children of immigrants to become legal citizens. Some question if it is a violation of the US constitution to allow the citizenship of children born on US soil to parents who have entered the US illegally. The 14th Amendment to the constitution addresses this issue, however how the US should proceed as a country is still up for a very real and reasonable...

We Must Educate The Children Of Illegal Immigrants

763 words - 3 pages Immigration laws have been a subject of debate throughout American history, especially in states such as California and Texas, where immigrant populations are high. Recently, some citizens have been questioning whether we should continue to educate the children of illegal immigrants. While this issue is steeped in emotional controversy, we must not allow divisive "us against them" rhetoric to cloud our thinking. Yes, educating undocumented...

An Examination Of The Children Of Immigrants Education Expectations

2018 words - 8 pages I. Introduction Immigration into America is growing at one the fast rates in history. Of those, the Latino population is one of the largest growing and least educated minority groups. They account for the lowest amount of college enrollment and educational attainment of any racial/ethnic group (Bohon, Johnson, &Gorman 2006). In order to improve educational attainment research and polices must emphasis on internal and external factors. ...

Children Born In The U.S. To Illegal Immigrants Should Not Become American Citizens

996 words - 4 pages Illegal or Legal Children Children born in the U.S. to illegal immigrants should not become U.S. citizens. Many pregnant immigrant women are illegally coming into the country just to have their babies. These women get free medical attention for themselves and the baby. This is costing the U.S. millions of dollars every year. It’s time to end the policy that illegal immigrant mothers can stay in the U.S. just because she has given birth...