Civil Disobedience Essay Examples

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Civil Disobedience Essay

1858 words - 7 pages When should civil disobedience be condoned? Should it be condoned? Civil disobedience is defined as the refusal to obey government laws, in an effort to bring upon a change in governmental policy or legislation. Civil disobedience is not an effort to dissolve the American government, because without government our society would result in chaos. Sometimes, when there is an unjust law and the government won't take the initiative to fix it, the public must act as civil disobedients to bring awareness and fix the unjust law. An unjust law is that which is not moral and does not respect the "god-given" rights which are entitled to every person. A law which allows freedom for some but not... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience Essay

1415 words - 6 pages Abstract Civil disobedience is the term assigned to actions taken by individuals to sway public opinion about laws that individuals deem unfair or unjust. Actions taken are usually nonviolent, and can include sit-ins, mass demonstrations, picket lines, and marches. Citizens are acting on their consciences, demonstrating highly advanced moral reasoning skills. Generally, these advanced skills fall into Kohlberg’s Six Stages of Moral Development, Stage Five and Six in particular. Characteristics of civil disobedience include no expression of anger, no cursing or insults, no retaliation, and submission to punishment by law enforcement. Historically, there have been many instances of civil... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience Essay

544 words - 2 pages Civil Disobedience Civil Disobedience, it has been around sense the time that man first walked on the earth. Some examples of disobedience are, in the Greek play Antigone and there are many more like the Rosa Parks incident and even I have some civil disobedience sometimes but that is the way that human nature works.In the Greek play Antigone, Antigone finds out that here two brothers have killed each other in a war between Thebes and Argos. Their names were Polyneices and Eteocles. King Creon had ordered that one was to be buried with full... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience Essay

1690 words - 7 pages Throughout History, there are always laws and rules; however, these rules wouldn’t evolve and progress in a government if it weren’t for civil disobedience. Throughout the course of history, especially in democracies, civil disobedience has been used to change unright laws, and it gives people the freedom to stand for what they believe in. There are countless examples of people who protested and changed the world. In a way, it also lets people stay true to what they believe is right, whether it be for religious reasons or just because of their ethics. Civil Disobedience is, and always has been, a part of society; it is not only a part of government, but it is also necessary in a democracy... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience Essay - 1609 words

1609 words - 6 pages Student's Last Name 1Coxsom 1Amber CoxsomProfessor IwamizuEnglish 10324 November 2014Civil DisobedienceThesis: The revolutionary ideas advocated by Thoreau and King has been influential in the subsequent social and political movements of Nelson Mandela.I. Henry David ThoreauBeliefsCivil DisobedienceMartin Luther KingCivil Rights MovementLetter from BirminghamNelson MandelaThe fight against the apartheidNon-Violent Peaceful... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience Essay

1719 words - 7 pages All throughout world history, human beings have participated in acts of civil disobedience. However, in the last two centuries the belief and practice of it has been in full swing and has even brought on major historical events, especially concerning equal rights and just laws. Three major firm believers and activists in civil disobedience were Henry David Thoreau, Martin Luther King Jr., and Gandhi. All three of these men participated in acts of civil disobedience but each in his own way and for different reasons. Henry David Thoreau believed that a certain war tax was unjust during the Mexican War and he refused to pay it. This then lead to his arrest and one day in jail where he... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience Essay - 1495 words

1495 words - 6 pages Civil Disobedience Civil disobedience: “Refusal to obey civil laws in an effort to induce change in governmental policy or legislation, characterized by the use of passive resistance or other non-violent means” (Houghton, 2000). Although this definition seems broad enough to cover any aspect of a discussion, there is still much to be said about the subject. Martin Luther King wrote a fifty paragraph letter about the timeliness and wisdom in such an action, while Hannah Arendt managed to squeeze her definition into six (extra long) paragraphs regarding Denmark and the Jews. But, regardless of... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience Essay - 1625 words

1625 words - 7 pages To Speak or Not to Speak? Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. received a Nobel Prize and was honored by the President of the United States for his contributions to society. On the other hand, he was prosecuted, convicted, incarcerated, and had his sentence reaffirmed by the Supreme Court. These explanations seem rather contradictory. If what he did was noble, why was he jailed for his actions? When we take into account these manifestations of the government's attitude towards Martin Luther King, we can safely make the assumption that the government is not always justified in the laws that it creates. Our government's original purpose was to keep order and ensure freedom to its people. As history... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience Essay - 1865 words

1865 words - 7 pages When governments act in a way that is contrary to God's commands, how should Christians respond? Many believers throughout history have asked themselves this question or one similar to it when they are faced with government actions that are incompatible with Christian teachings. The issue also has relevance today as many believers are concerned with various issues such as government laws allowing abortions and, in Canada, with the passing of Bill C-250 that many fear will make preaching against homosexuality a hate crime. The morality of civil disobedience is controversial issue among Christians with some believing that obedience is of primary importance, while others feel that promoting... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience Essay - 2282 words

2282 words - 9 pages According to dictionary.com , civil disobedience is defined as "the refusal to obey certain laws or governmental demands for the purpose of influencing legislation or government policy, characterized by the employment of such nonviolent techniques as boycotting, picketing, and non-payment of taxes." Laws are an essential aspect to any functioning society. They are the guidelines to every aspect of life as a member of a community, and of how each individual should live. Failure to implement or adhere by them would surely result in mad chaos. While these statements are fairly obvious, there are certain circumstances that call for some bending of the rules. Stealing to feed your family,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience - 1083 words

1083 words - 4 pages Henry Thoreau's idea on Civil Disobedience was of government that was begin injustice and not having the conscience state of mind. He was a man who respected nature and loved to live the simply life. In the 21st century we can find these same ideas shared by other citizens. The essay in which he writes states facts that some what exists in today's society such as governments and how to handle it; people begin able to be individuals/ self -reliance and how these... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience - 3457 words

3457 words - 14 pages Civil Disobedience History, as Karl Marx suggest, is defined by human suffering. When a man is oppressed, his natural recours is rebellion. Most ost restiance movements of the past incorporated violenve. Violence has been a mean to an end for centurys. Even today our lives are chronicled through violence and human suffering. However, a paradox ensues when revolutionaries use violence to free themselves from oppression, as a mean to an end. By replacing violence with violence, you are only contuining a destructive cycle that can in no way liberate everybody. It oppresses the oppressor and depresses the depressed. Martin Luther King jr. sought to remedy this unhealthy cycle by... VIEW DOCUMENT
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America Needs Civil Disobedience

1428 words - 6 pages Civil disobedience, showing defiance against obeying a law or accepting a principle deemed unjust by his or her conscience. Advocates of civil disobedience, usually used as a form of passive resistance, use their morals to support their illegal actions for the sake of bringing awareness to their plight. Many faced beatings, imprisonment, and even death for pursuing a change and a revolution. The strategy of breaking laws has evoked the controversy of the integrity of civil disobedience. The proclaimers of civil disobedience have many points that obviously substantiate their views on the topic. (Civil Disobedience) Although the public has all these forms of legal retaliation, some feel... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Importance of Civil Disobedience

1939 words - 8 pages For as long as there have been rulers, there has been disunity between rulers and ruled. Citizens have always found ways to show their disapproval of governmental decisions and demanded action. Civil Disobedience has existed since the ancient Greek . From Antigone's defiance of Creon over Ghandi's Salt march in India to the Occupy Movement. What does the aforementioned mean? Civil Disobedience, the term formulated by Henry David Thoreau, in his essay in 1848, to describe his refusal to pay the state poll tax, to fund the U.S. Government’s war with Mexico, prioritized one's conscience over the dictates of law. Nowadays the word is defined as a „the refusal to comply with certain laws... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Thoreau's Civil Disobedience

1093 words - 4 pages 1. Does Henry Thoreau want a revolution? Would his new government, based on his ideas set forth in "Civil Disobedience," be compatible with democracy?In Civil Disobedience and Other Essays, Thoreau declared that the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Saul ALinsky - Civil Disobedience

1925 words - 8 pages Saul Alinsky, a man of many virtues pioneered civil disobedience in the midTwentieth century by inspiring entire communities to act as a whole in order to effect aspecific cause. Historical figures such as Buddha, Jesus Christ, St. Francis of Assisi,Mohandas Gandhi, and Martin Luther King have also encouraged various forms of civildisobedience to achieve their goals of peace and... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Comparison of Civil Disobedience

3693 words - 15 pages Comparing the Civil Disobedience of Martin Luther King Jr., Henry David Thoreau, and Mohandas Gandhi      From the onset of man fighting for freedom or his beliefs, the question has always been whether one person can make a difference using words rather than wars. Philosophically, the concept of civil disobedience would appear to be an ineffective weapon against political injustice; history however has proven it to repeatedly be one of the most powerful weapons of the common man. Martin Luther King Jr. looked at the way African Americans were treated in the United States and saw an inequality. By refusing to pay his taxes and subsequently being imprisoned for a night, Henry David Thoreau... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Thoreau's Civil Disobedience

765 words - 3 pages Thoreau's Civil Disobedience talks about politics, government and the issues concerning these areas today. "Government is best which governs least." This motto means that the government should not have complete power over the people. The people's opinion is what matters the most. Individualism is stressed throughout his writing. To stand up for what you believe in and not bend backwards for the government is necessary. He speaks of Slavery and the war in Mexico and how is must be put to a stop. The people are responsible for this happening. Many people opposed these things yet did nothing to change it. Allowing yourself to be a part of injustice makes you a part of the negativity. ... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Ethics of Civil Disobedience

1782 words - 7 pages Ethics of Civil Disobedience Ban animal cruelty! Give aid to the poor! Save the rainforests! Obey the law! As a human race we must strive to fulfill these commands, for they are our moral duties and obligations. Our obligation to morality sometimes leads to a dilemma. What happens when a law contradicts the morally right thing to do? Would it be moral to act illegally by breaking the law? No matter how drastic the measure, we are still required to act morally--even if one must break the law to do so. But why is it so important to be moral that one could justify something as serious as breaking the law? If morality is so significant that one could justify breaking the law we must... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Case Against Civil Disobedience

926 words - 4 pages Civil Disobedience is a deliberate violation against the law in order to invoke change against a government policy. Civil disobedience can come in the form of running a red light or j-walking, or in more noticeable methods such as riots. Coined by American author and poet Henry David Thoreau, the term has developed to define the act of disobeying a law one sees as unfit or unjust. Usually the purpose of civil disobedience is to gain public attention to a perceived injustice and appeal to or gain support from the public in a non-violent way. The idea is to force the government to negotiate or else continue with the unwanted behavior; or in simpler terms, to “clog the machine” (“Civil... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Essay on Gandhi's Civil Disobedience

1033 words - 4 pages 02/26/14Michelle GuNonviolenceCivil Disobedience - Salt MarchSalt March is a major nonviolent action in India led by Mohandas K. Gandhi from March to April in 1930. The march was the first act in an ever-larger campaign of civil disobedience. It was proposed by Gandhi and waged to go against British rule of Salt Tax in India that extended into early 1931.Salt production and contribution in India had been a complete British monopoly after the British government... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience in Famous Literature

750 words - 3 pages Civil Disobedience in Famous Literature A society or a people cannot let a government lead them blindly. With misrepresentation comes a whole new form of unjustness. The strong are the ones who do not give into demands placed upon them if they do not agree; those who refuse to conform to society; those who stick to their beliefs, no matter the cost. In many cases, those people are the ones who practice civil disobedience. Martin Luther King, Henry Thoreau, Socrates… All advocated that they should not be denied their freedom, and all were considered disobedient. The government rules itself not by appealing to man’s “sense, intellectual or moral, but only through his body, his senses.... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Thoreau's Civil Disobedience and Walden

1522 words - 6 pages Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was an American philosopher, author, poet, abolitionist, and naturalist. He was famous for his essay, “Civil Disobedience”, and his book, Walden. He believed in individual conscience and nonviolent acts of political resistance to protest unfair laws. Moreover, he valued the importance of observing nature, being individual, and living in a simple life by his own values. His writings later influenced the thoughts of Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. In “Civil Disobedience” and Walden, he advocated individual nonviolent resistance to the unjust state and reflected his simple living in the nature. In “Civil Disobedience,” Thoreau stated that government... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience and the Bible

1015 words - 4 pages Civil disobedience is a nonviolent opposition to a law through refusal to comply with it, on grounds of conscience. I understand why somebody might want to oppose the law. Somebody might have their own beliefs on what is right and wrong and they wouldn’t know when they're disobeying. But when you do know what you're doing, if you don’t obey a certain law set forth for you to follow, there most likely will be some kind of consequence for not following the law. You could go to jail, be put on restraint, have something taken away, etc. There are a number of other consequences that could be given to someone for disobeying a law. The Bible talks about obedience. When Solomon and his... VIEW DOCUMENT
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A Free Society Must Expect Civil Disobedience

2305 words - 9 pages A Free Society Must Expect Civil Disobedience        Are we morally obliged to obey even unjust laws? Think about what this means. This means that laws, regardless of how unfair, unjust, or immoral they may be, must be followed with no better reason that they are the law. To the thesis that we are obliged to obey even unjust laws, I will argue that the standard objections to Civil Disobedience, given by Singer, are incorrect               To begin, however, I believe it is necessary to define an "unjust" law. According to St. Thomas Aquinas, "Any law that uplifts human personality is just. Any law that degrades human personality is unjust." (King, 3) According to Dr.... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience By Henry David Thoreau

765 words - 3 pages Philosophers, historians, authors, and politicians have spent centuries pondering the relationship between citizens and their government. It is a question that has as many considerations as there are forms of government and it is rarely answered satisfactorily. A relatively modern theorist, author HenryThoreau, introduced an idea of man as an individual, rather than a subject, by thoroughly describing the way a citizen should live many of his works. He indirectly supplements the arguments he presents in his essay Civil Disobedience through a comprehensive selection of adages found in his other... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Justice in Henry David Thoreau’s Civil Disobedience

925 words - 4 pages Justice Henry David Thoreau’s Civil Disobedience By definition justice means the quality of being just or fair. The issue then stands, is justice fair for everyone? Justice is the administration of law, the act of determining rights and assigning rewards or punishments, "justice deferred is justice denied.” The terms of Justice is brought up in Henry David Thoreau’s writing, “Civil Disobedience.” Justice has different standards for every group that it is presented upon. Thoreau’s opinions and criticism is strongly stated. Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was described as many things. Thoreau was an author and naturalist with very Republican views. Morals inspired him. He ties in morality... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience as a Method of Protest

884 words - 4 pages By definition, civil disobedience means to actively refuse to obey certain laws, demands, and commands of a government or of an occupying power without resorting to physical violence (Wikipedia 2007). Many of the influential people in history have felt passionately about what they believe. These passions caused them to rebel against a government or authority. Many times they felt so strongly about what they believed and how they were being treated was wrong they became disobedient. They would take physical and verbal abuse for being disobedient but would never retaliate. They believed in what they thought was wrong and tried to change the way they were governed. Albert Einstein... VIEW DOCUMENT
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"Civil Disobedience" By David Henry Thoreau

967 words - 4 pages Civil DisobedienceHenry David ThoreauAmerican author and naturalist, Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Mass, in 1817. Thoreau, a graduate of Harvard in 1837, is considered one of the most influential figures in American thought and literature. Known for being an individualist, Thoreau fought against materialism and social conformity. This individualistic belief is reflected in his numerous writings.In one of Thoreau's most noted and influential works, the essay "Civil Disobedience," he begins an attack on the philosophy of a... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Promoting the Use of Civil Disobedience

699 words - 3 pages According to St. Augustine “an unjust law is not a law at all”(p186). This belief has been shared by many influential leaders in the past, including Henry Thoreau, Mahatma Ghandi, and Martin Luther King. They all believed in a non-violent approach to solving their social grievances. In most cases their approach was successful and was noticed by society and brought about a change in the laws. This nonviolent perspective stems straight from Jesus, who says, “Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you, and persecute you.”(p192). Others believe that by being disobedient you are under minding the laws and thus... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Comparing Thoreau's Civil Disobedience and Orwell's 1984

896 words - 4 pages Civil Disobedience and 1984 In Orwell’s 1984, the government is all controlling, all manipulative, and all knowing. They maintain every aspect of their member’s lives and monitor them constantly. Conversely, in the context of Civil Disobedience, the government is a form of direct democracy. People have their right to vote and the right to openly express their opinions. The main character of 1984 lives in constant fear of his government while Thoreau argues with his and suggests a variety of ways to cause reformation, he has the freedom of expression much unlike Winston. This is an essential point when trying to suggest any of Thoreau’s ideas to reform 1984 socialistic government. There... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Evaluation of Dworkin's and Habermas's Approach to Civil Disobedience

1608 words - 6 pages Evaluation of Dworkin's and Habermas's Approach to Civil Disobedience The following essay will attempt to evaluate the approach taken by Dworkin and Habermas on their views of civil disobedience. The two main pieces of literature referred to will be Dworkin?s paper on 'Civil Disobedience and Nuclear Protest?' and Habermas's paper on 'Civil Disobedience: Litmus Test for the Democratic Constitutional State.' An outline of both Dworkin's and Habermas's approach will be given , further discussion will then focus on a reflective evaluation of these approaches. Firstly though, it is worth commenting on civil disobedience in a more general context. Most would agree that civil disobedience is a... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Should Civil Disobedience Be Permitted In A Democracy?

520 words - 2 pages Civil disobedience is the act of disobeying the law on the grounds of political principle without using violence. People decide to use civil disobedience as a means of getting into court in hopes of changing any laws they feel are unconstitutional and unjust. Henry David Thoreau believed "People living in a democracy have the right to disobey any law they believe is unjust." Martin Luther King Jr. said, "We are American citizens. We are not here to advocate violence, the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Should Civil Disobedience Be Permitted In A Democracy?

520 words - 2 pages Civil disobedience is the act of disobeying the law on the grounds of political principle without using violence. People decide to use civil disobedience as a means of getting into court in hopes of changing any laws they feel are unconstitutional and unjust. Henry David Thoreau believed "People living in a democracy have the right to disobey any law they believe is unjust." Martin Luther King Jr. said, "We are American citizens. We are not here to advocate violence, the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience and It's Relation to the Democratic Process

1523 words - 6 pages Everything in the universe is a system that must progress, and in order to progress, it must consume and test the realities around it. Throughout the history of humanity, individuals and groups have always defied laws that they believe are unjust and have always moved to progress society based on either their own motives. The idea of Democracy is revolutionary; it is a microcosm of the collective reality because different entities always come together in a feedback loop in order for their motives to coalesce and balance each other out. This is the case from large galactic masses to individuals engaging in civil disobedience in order to further a cause. Despite concerns that it eliminates... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience Various Approaches of Socrates, King, Malcolm X

1305 words - 5 pages Civil Disobedience is one of the most basic rights of every citizen that lives on this planet. It is through civil disobedience that citizens are able to vent their feelings against the government and able to enact changes that they feel are necessary for the wellbeing of the entire society. However there are many various approaches to civil disobedience as shown by Socrates in the Crito, by Martin Luther King Jr. in his "Letter from Birmingham Jail", and Malcolm X in his speech, "The Ballot or the Bullet". However in this paper I will show that VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience - A public right or a crime?

2142 words - 9 pages Justice, the rights of choice, freedom from domination, national and civil liberty; in today's world society's whose citizens have personal and political liberties are considered free. But do institutionalized rights guarantee freedom? Does political liberty create a just and free society? When good Governments go bad and overstep their mark do citizens have the right of dissent? Throughout history thinkers have grappled with questions like these and come to a variety of conclusions, both in support of and protest and against it.Freedom is a universal ideal. It occurs when there are no restraints placed on personal choice by another individual, state or authority. To be truly free... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Citizenship and Government in Henry Thoreau's Civil Disobedience

773 words - 3 pages Citizenship and Government in Henry Thoreau's Civil Disobedience Philosophers, historians, authors, and politicians have spent centuries pondering the relationship between citizens and their government. It is a question that has as many considerations as there are forms of government and it is rarely answered satisfactorily. A relatively modern theorist, author Henry Thoreau, introduced an idea of man as an individual, rather than a subject, by thoroughly describing the way a citizen should live many of his works. He indirectly supplements the arguments he presents in his essay Civil Disobedience through a comprehensive selection of adages found in his other works. In particular, the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Martin Luther King Jr. and John Brown's Civil Disobedience

2007 words - 8 pages Civil disobedience is a form of non-violent direct action and respectful disagreement. Martin Luther King Jr. is most famous for his role in leading the African American Civil Rights Movement and using non-violent civil disobedience to promote his beliefs. He strongly believed that civil disobedience was the way to eliminate racial segregation against African Americans. While leading a protest march on the streets, King was arrested and sent to jail. In jail, he read an article written by a group of clergymen arguing against King’s acts of civil disobedience, saying that racial segregation should be negotiated in the courts, rather than in the streets, and accused King of causing unnecessary... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience Martin Luther King David Thoreau LA riot

1131 words - 5 pages Civil Disobedience On April 29, 1992, the City of Los Angeles was surrounded in a riot in response to the "not guilty" verdicts in the trial of four white Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) officers accused of unlawfully beating Rodney King. Six days later, when the fires were finally extinguished and the smoke had cleared, “estimates of the material damage done vary between about $800 million and $1 billion, 54 people had been killed, more than 2000 injured, in excess of 800 structures were burned, and about 10,000 people were arrested.”(Khalifah 89) The 1992 riots in the City of Los Angeles were arguably the most devastating civil disturbance in the history of the United... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Comparing Letter from a Birmingham Jail and Civil Disobedience

1866 words - 7 pages Martin Luther King and Henry David Thoreau each write exemplary persuasive essays that depict social injustice and discuss civil disobedience, which is the refusal to comply with the law in order to prove a point. In his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” King speaks to a specific audience: the African Americans, and discusses why he feels they should bring an end to segregation. Thoreau on the other hand, in “Civil Disobedience,” speaks to a broader, non-addressed audience as he largely expresses his feelings towards what he feels is an unjust government. Both essays however, focus on the mutual topics of morality and justice and use these topics to inform and motivate their... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Impractical Philosophies of Self-reliance and Civil Disobedience

1094 words - 4 pages The Impractical Philosophies of Self-reliance and Civil Disobedience   The philosophies of Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson would work well in a society comprised only of highly intellectual, healthy individuals who were willing put forth the effort needed to thoroughly examine themselves and formulate their own opinions about every issue pertaining to them. Emerson said that all members of society should think for themselves and formulate their own opinions rather than conforming to a popular belief. Thoreau said that the best government was no government, and that people should always do what was just. A society that functioned under the ideals of Emerson and Thoreau... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Exploration of Civil Disobedience in Sophocles' Antigone, King's Letter from Birmingham Jail, and Plato's From Crito

579 words - 2 pages Exploration of Civil Disobedience in Sophocles' Antigone, King's Letter from Birmingham Jail, and Plato's From Crito Civil disobedience spawns a major and widely debated issue by many who established by well-known intelligent scholars and many examples of civil disobedience become displayed. The acts of civil disobedience can be noted in major works such as Sophocles?s Antigone, King?s ?Letter from Birmingham Jail?, or even from Plato?s ?from Crito?. A specific claim exemplified throughout these works make that civil disobedience races in gaining popularity and should remain allowed, and continued to be seen as a solution to reform poorly established laws. A claim represented is, civil... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Civil Disobedience of Antigone and the Teachings of Martin Luther King Jr.

1543 words - 6 pages From the monarchs of the ancient era to the democracy of today, order has been maintained by means of rules and regulations known as laws. Compliance with these laws is enforced through punishments ranging in severity according to the crimes committed to reduce violence and misconduct from individuals within a society. However, just as citizens consent to abide by the laws of the state in which they reside, one is compelled to preserve justice and condemn the unjust decisions of man when the social contract contradicts the laws sanctioned by God. Approaching this conflict between natural and manmade laws in a non-violent manner is called “civil disobedience”. One of the most well known... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Henry David Thoreau's Civil Disobedience and Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail

816 words - 3 pages Henry David Thoreau's Civil Disobedience and Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, in “Civil Disobedience” and “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” respectively, both conjure a definitive argument on the rights of insubordination during specified epochs of societal injustice. Thoreau, in his enduring contemplation of life and its purpose, insightfully analyzes the conflicting relationship between the government and the people it governs. He considerately evokes the notion that the majority of people are restrained by the government and society from making decisions with consideration of their conscience and that people need to overcome... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Comparing Thoreau’s Civil Disobedience and King's Letter From a Birmingham Jail

1066 words - 4 pages Comparing Thoreau’s Civil Disobedience and Martin Luther King's Letter From a Birmingham Jail The two essays, "Civil Disobedience," by Henry David Thoreau, and "Letter From a Birmingham Jail," by Martin Luther King, Jr., effectively illustrate the authors' opinions of justice. Each author has his main point; Thoreau, in dealing with justice as it relates to government, asks for "not at once no government, but at once a better government. King contends that "injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." Both essays offer a complete argument for justice, but, given the conditions, King's essay remains more effective, in that its persuasive techniques have more practical... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Literary comparison between Henry Thoreau's "Civil Disobedience" and Martin Luther King's "Letters from Birmingham Jail."

978 words - 4 pages Martin King and Henry Thoreau both write persuasive expositions that oppose majority ideals and justify their own causes. While this similarity is clear, the two essays, "Letters from Birmingham Jail" by King and "Civil Disobedience" by Thoreau, do have their fair share of differences. Primarily in the causes themselves, as King persuades white, southern clergy men that segregation is an evil, unjust law that should be defeated through the agitation of direct protesting, and Thoreau, writing to a more broad, non addressed audience, and focusing more on the government itself,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Civil Disobedience, by Henry David Thoreau and Letter From Birmingham Jail, by Martin Luther King Jr.

1036 words - 4 pages The essays, "Civil Disobedience," by Henry David Thoreau, and "Letter from a Birmingham Jail," by Martin Luther King, Jr., incorporate the authors’ opinions of justice. Each author efficiently shows their main point; Thoreau deals with justice as it relates to government, he asks for,”not at one no government, but at once a better government.”(Paragraph 3). King believed,” injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." (Paragraph 4). Each essay shows a valid argument for justice, but King's philosophy is more effective, because it has more logical points of views. King’s letter from a Birmingham Jail was an act of his encouragement for protest against the white’s traditions in... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Comparing Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail

727 words - 3 pages "...A little rebellion now and then is a good thing...It is a medicine necessary for the sound health of government." Thomas JeffersonThoreau, a transcendentalist from the mid 19th century and Martin Luther King Jr., the Civil Rights movement leader of a century later both believed the necessity of medicine for government. Although they showed disagreement of opinion on issues regarding voting, both writers agreed on the necessity to reform the government and the means of accomplishing it. In King's Letter from Birmingham Jail and Thoreau's Civil Disobedience, both agreed on injustice of majority to rule over minority, both resisted the government passively, and both wanted a... VIEW DOCUMENT
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An Informative Essay on the life and accomplishments of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi. Discusses also Civil Disobedience.

703 words - 3 pages Throughout history most national heroes have been warriors, but Gandhi ended British rule over his native India without striking a single blow. A frail man, he devoted his life to peace and brotherhood in order to achieve social and political progress. Yet less than six months after his nonviolent resistance to British rule won independence for India, he was assassinated by a religious fanatic. Gandhi was one of the gentlest of men, a devout and almost mystical Hindu, but he had an iron core of determination. Nothing could change his convictions. This combination of traits made him the leader of India's nationalist movement. Some observers called him a master politician. Others believed... VIEW DOCUMENT