Communicable Diseases Essay Examples

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Communicable Diseases Essay

973 words - 4 pages Running head: COMMUNICABLE DISEASE - CHLAMYDIA 1Communicable Disease - ChlamydiaTeresa BakerHCS/457University of PhoenixJune 30, 2014Jeffrey RhoadesChlamydiaA communicable disease is an infectious disease that be transferred from an infected person to another. Communicable disease can spread very easy and quickly, they can even be simple such as a common cold or be very serious and led to death such as HIV/AIDS virus. Spreading awareness and educational information about communicable diseases is the largest way to prevent many of the communicable disease that are active today among the communities.The Disease and... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Diet, Health, and Noncommunicable Diseases Essay

2212 words - 9 pages The World Health Organization’s (WHO) definition of health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples states that “Indigenous individuals have an equal right to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health. States shall take the necessary steps with a view to achieving progressively the full realization of this right”, thus affirming the basic human right to life and health that is guaranteed under international human rights law. It also goes on to state, “Indigenous peoples have the right to promote, develop and maintain... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Quarantining of Tuberculosis Essay

1447 words - 6 pages In today's crowded world, there has been a growing threat of airborne pathogens. These communicable diseases easily spread from one person to another. Many countries have already established systems in which they take action towards preventing the further spreading and isolating of the disease. One country that has not constructed a specific system on how they contain communicable diseases is America. In order to approximate what America's actions would be, people must first view countries similar to America and their approaches on how they contain communicable diseases, such as Toronto and VIEW DOCUMENT
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Sleep Health Effects Essay

1064 words - 4 pages Everyone has experienced the late night movie marathon, the extensive studying prior to final exams, and the staying up all night letting the mind wander. These one night, every once in a while habits can become routine if not monitored by the individual. Sleep is essential to one’s overall well-being and the consequences to not receiving adequate sleep is extensive. These occasional habits occur more often than one would believe. Studies from HealthyPeople.gov and CDC.gov have shown a significant increase in negative sleep habits resulting in injury. In a study directed by healthypeople.gov, nearly 25 percent of all U.S. adults reported to have insufficient sleep patterns approximately 15... VIEW DOCUMENT
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International Public Health Essay

2933 words - 12 pages “Health problems, issues, and concerns that transcend national boundaries, may be influenced by circumstances or experiences in other countries, and are best addressed by cooperative actions and solutions”(Skolnik p.7) is best defined as global health by the Institute of Medicine. With its primary focus on low and middle-income countries, challenges of international public health continue to change and grow depending on the interest of the membership. In order to participate in cooperative actions and have successful solutions, one must understand the progress made so far, the challenges that remain, and what must be done to address them most effectively. With the adoption of the Millennium... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccinations Should be Mandatory in the State of California

2212 words - 9 pages Vaccinations should be mandatory for all children within the State of California as this will reduce the death rate associated with preventable communicably infectious diseases. Routine vaccinations during early developments have been historical proven to reduce the onset and spread of potentially infectious microbial agents. According to the Center of Disease Control and Prevention, “Vaccines have reduced some preventable infectious diseases to an all-time low, and now few people experience the devastating effects of measles, pertussis, and other illnesses (Prevention). Representatives, I’m sure that some of you in here, right now, agree that our further relies heavily... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Poverty and Common Mental Disorders in Developing Countries

1172 words - 5 pages The two most striking take-home messages from this paper are: common mental disorders should be looked at on par with other diseases associated with poverty (like tuberculosis); treatment and prevention of mental diseases should involve confronting poverty and economic development, apart from the medical interventions. The rest of the paper provides a discussion of the evidence backing these points and the ways in which they can be implemented. These conclusions and the reasons why they are remarkable are discussed in this critique. This is a review of 11 community studies on the association between poverty and common mental disorders in six low- and middle-income countries published in... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Persuasive Essay

811 words - 3 pages The HPV Vaccination Should Be The Parent's Decision"Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is a vaccine that targets certain sexually transmitted strains of human papillomavirus associated with the development of cervical cancer and genital warts. Two HPV vaccines are currently on the market: Gardasil and Cervarix" (wikipedia 2007). The HPV vaccines are recommended for girls ages 11-26, who have never been sexually active. The HPV vaccine does not treat cervical cancer, it may prevent cancer. Some... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Was Disease a key factor Essay

1139 words - 5 pages I believe disease was a key factor if not the primary factor in the depopulation of Native Americans in the Americas. Throughout time, there has always been inequality during the evolution of humanity. Over the course of evolution, different cultures as well as races have progressed more rapidly and at a stronger rate than others have. The depopulation of Native Americans happened because Europeans had better and more efficient supplies as well as immunities to the diseases that they brought over with them. While the Europeans were traveling to the New World, they often brought domesticated animals with them for sources of food and livestock. When animals and humans are living in close... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Euthanasia With Consent From The Affected Individu

820 words - 3 pages Euthanasia With Consent From the Affected Individual With an Incurable Disease Euthanasia to many people is considered murder, I, on the other hand, believe that it is a deathly sick person's own decision to continue living life or not. When so many people are enduring prolonged deaths as a consequence of chronic, progressive diseases which contribute to needless suffering, physically, emotionally, and spiritually, it makes life worse for both the dying person and loved ones of that person. If an extremely ill person makes the decision that they want to end their life then they should not be forced to continue dying and suffering. A family has the option to "unplug" a family... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Individual and Society

1629 words - 7 pages Individual and Society Medicine Since 1715 Medicine has been a great advancement in society. Without the advancement in medicine, we would not have the lifestyle that we do today. Many different nations and individuals within those nations have contributed to this progression. Medicine has greatly increased the life- span of humans. We are where we stand today because of the many great people we have had in our history who contributed to and performed medical advances. The tests and theories of these people have been a major contributing factor. William Cullen said, "Every one nowadays pretends to neglect theory, and to stick to observation. But the first is in talk only, for every... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Effects of Watching too much TV

568 words - 2 pages EFFECTS OF WATCHING TOO MUCH TVDiscoveries and invention of devices are always welcome till we, humans, find a way to abuse its benefits and be adversely affected by it. This was the case when Wilhelm Roentgen discovered x-ray and within five years, the British Army was using a mobile x-ray unit to locate bullets and shrapnel in wounded soldiers in the Sudan. TV was also invented with positive thoughts in mind - there would be no national borders, education and communication would be worldwide, etc. However, we are now trying to overcome its physiological and psychological adverse effects on human beings.One of the physiological effects of VIEW DOCUMENT
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Funding of Sickle Cell Diseases Because of Race.

2154 words - 9 pages Funding of sickle cell diseases because of Race. “In the United States, it's estimated that sickle cell anemia affects 70,000–100,000 people, mainly African Americans” (NHLBI, NIH, Who is at risk for sickle cell anemia). SCD is a disease that is a serious disorder in which the body can make normal blood cells and sickle shape cells. Sickle shape cells can block the blood flow in your vessels and cause pain or organ damage also put you in risk for infections. SCD has no cure available but there are many treatments out there to deal with the complications of it. From over years treatments did get better from way back in the day doctors have learned.... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Parkinsons Disease

655 words - 3 pages James Parkinson first discovered Parkinson's Disease in 1817. Parkinson's Disease is a common neurologic disorder for the elderly. It is a disorder of the brain characterized by shaking and difficulty with walking, movement, and coordination. This disease is associated with damage to a part of the brain that controls muscle movement. Parkinson's Disease is a chronic illness that is still being extensively studied. Parkinson's Disease has caused problems for many people in this world and plagued the elderly all over the world.Parkinson's disease still puzzles doctors and the causes are unknown. It is known that it is a non-communicable disease and may even be hereditary. Parkinson's... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Moral Right...or The Greater Good?

1244 words - 5 pages Sex is a topic that is rarely openly discussed in America. Some would say that is an example of moral decency, others might argue that this is just a prudish mindset we inherited from early puritan settlers. Sex for pay or prostitution, is one concept so at odds with this taboo that it has been declared immoral and illegal. Forty-eight out of fifty states have decided that prostitution should be illegal. On the surface, this widespread ban on prostitution may appear to combat the spread disease and sex slavery, but, upon further inspection, this assertion might not be supported by facts. The creation of a legal and highly-regulated form of prostitution in the United States could help slow... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Controling Infectious and Contagious Diseases

1109 words - 4 pages The original inception of the public health discipline/field was to control infectious and contagious diseases within the population. Starting with Dr. John Snow in the late 1800s and moving forward, the control and/or eradication of disease has been a chief concern using primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention (UCLA, 2013). Large-scale projects such as widespread water fluoridation and the eradication of smallpox are chapters in the history of public health. Recently however, there has been a significant shift from the scope of contagious disease to lifestyle or behavioral (including mental) diseases. Lifestyle/behavioral diseases such as COPD, heart disease, cancer, mental... VIEW DOCUMENT
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A Comparison of Three Pandemics: Their Cause, Impact on Society, and Mortalities

1243 words - 5 pages When one brings up the three diseases: Spanish flu, Black Plaque, and AIDS, what comes to mind? Is it the fact that each of them has killed millions? Or, that they each came at different periods of time on earth? I would like to compare the agents of each particular disease and portions of the world that was affected by these pandemics as well. Additionally, I would like to discuss the symptoms, cures, and potential cures for these diseases. The Black Death started in the fourteenth century. Relative to world population, it was by far the worst plague. Roughly one-third of the earth’s inhabitants died from it. Europe in particular suffered the most, losing sixty percent of its population... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Necrotizing Fasciitis: The Flesh Eating Disease

593 words - 2 pages Necrotizing Fasciitis: The Flesh Eating Disease Necrotizing Fasciitis is also known as the flesh-eating disease. It is a rare disease that causes the deterioration of the flesh, causing extensive destruction of the tissues. It can kill. The disease is very uncommon and only infects about one in a million people each year in Canada. There is some concern and suggestions that cases of this disease may be on the increase. Most of these serious infections occur between the months of October and March. The good news is that fifty to seventy percent of people who get this disease recover. When people get this illness, the symptoms are fever, severe pain, and a red,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Smallpox

1314 words - 5 pages Cancer, AIDS, Ebola "" when mentioned, one can only shiver in fear about what it must be like to be infected with one of these terrible diseases. However, when the disease smallpox is mentioned in today's society, many think nothing of it. Lack of education about smallpox has made some humans unaware of its existence. For others, they could care less about this recently "eradicated" disease. But, for those who lived during major outbreaks of smallpox, it was a very serious issue that everyone knew about and paid much attention to. After all, it was not known as "one of humankind's greatest scourges since time immemorial"(The Triumph over) for no reason at all."The term small pockes... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Sexually Transmitted Diseases

1600 words - 6 pages Sexually Transmitted Diseases Sex is a popular subject; it is on television, in advertisements, in magazines, and practically everywhere. One very serious side effect of an increase of sexual activity is the risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases. They affect more than twelve million Americans each year. Sexually transmitted diseases are becoming common and widely spread throughout Americans because of unprotected sex, permiscuity, and multiple sex partners. Some of the most commonly found sexually transmitted diseases are gonorrhea, chlamydia, HIV/AIDS, and syphilis. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates there are six hundred-fifty... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Autoimmune Disorders

1630 words - 7 pages The immune system consists of a defense system that shields the body against invasion from infections and other diseases. Normally, a healthy person's immune system has the ability to differentiate between its own cells and cells that represent threats to the health of the body. (Craft and Kanter, 2002). The term "autoimmune disease" refers to a wide-range of well over 80 acute, long-lasting diseases that involve nearly every organ in the body's system. With autoimmune diseases, the underlying issue is similar--the body's immune system becomes misdirected, attacking the precise organs it was intended to guard. As a result, the body's own defense mechanism produces antibodies that attack the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Role of the States In Health Care Policy

1036 words - 4 pages The government’s responsibilities concerning health care has grown over the last 100 years. After the Great Depression, Social Security was formed; and in the 1960s, Medicare and Medicaid were enacted. Federal responsibilities grew until the “New Federalism” of the 1990s increased reliance on the states for health care (Longest, 2010, pp. 30-33). Smaller, more local government can represent its citizen’s values better, and it knows the nature of its citizens’ problems. The New Federalism did not significantly change health policy; it gave the states more authority in setting policy and more flexibility in administering programs (Longest, 2010, pp. 30-33). States and localities became the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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In Praise of Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel

1011 words - 4 pages In Praise of Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel Jared Diamond's bestseller Guns, Germs, and Steel (GG&S) is an attempt to explain why some parts of the world are currently powerful and prosperous while others are poor. Diamond is both a physiologist and a linguist who spends a good deal of his time living with hunter gathers in Papua New Guinea. As a researcher and as a human being, he is convinced that all people have the same potential. Hunter gatherers are just as intelligent, resourceful, and diligent as anybody else. Yet material "success" isn't equally distributed across the globe. Civilization sprung up in relatively few places and spread in a defined pattern. I should... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Human Environmental Hazards

851 words - 3 pages Physical hazards affect populations all over the world, regardless of wealth, location or other factors which tend to differentiate people and cultures from one another. Physical hazards in the environment are naturally occurring events and disasters with the capability of threatening physical safety. Hurricanes, volcanic eruptions, tornados, earthquakes, floods, and landslides are all different types of physical hazards that can have devastating effects on mankind (Library Index, Natural Hazard, 2011). There are primary and secondary effects to these physical hazards. Primary effects are a result of the event or disaster itself. For instance, flood waters damaging houses and buildings, or... VIEW DOCUMENT
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History of Public Health

1102 words - 4 pages Public health strategies and interventions have changed drastically over time. Bloodletting is one of the most ancient forms of medical interventions. It originated in the ancient civilizations of Egypt and Greece, persisting through the Medieval, Renaissance, and Enlightenment periods (PBS). Doctors used the bloodletting method for every ailment imaginable; from pneumonia, bone fractures, and even wounds, bloodletting was as trusted and popular as aspirin is today. Public health can be dated back to the Romans whom understood even during this time frame that proper division of human waste was a necessary tenant of public health in urban areas. Even dating as early as 1000 BC, the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Epidemics and Pandemics throughout History

2351 words - 9 pages When looking back on history, it is evident to see that humans by nature are warriors. Humans often find themselves fighting mysterious battles against disguised enemies. Throughout history the earth has been afflicted with mysterious diseases, which tend to invisibly cause the preponderance of civilizations to perish. The evolution of infectious diseases has and always will provide challenges for humankind (Hoff, Smith, and Calisher 6-7). Over the course of time, humans gradually developed a preference to live in large urban settings. Urbanization and the cross-cultural interaction of civilizations have both strongly provoked widespread illness, which is known as an epidemic or pandemic... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Infectious diseases

1889 words - 8 pages Infectious DiseasesA communicable disease is an illness caused by micro-organisms. It is transmitted from an infected animal or person to another person or animal. It is also called a contagious disease.Not all microbes can cause disease. The ones that can are called pathogens. Pathogens have developed to infect the body's tissues, where they reproduce and cause damage. Various types of bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa can cause disease.PathogensDiseasesBacteria*Cholera*Diptheria*Plague*Tetanus*Tuberculosis*Typhoid Fever*Gonorrhea*Syphilis*Whooping CoughVirus*Chicken Pox*Common... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Understanding Malaria

750 words - 3 pages Understanding Malaria For several years, I have had an interest in virology and the spread and characteristics of various infectious diseases. Though it makes sense not to possibly induce a state of panic by informing individuals of illnesses that are not native to the area they live in and that they are not likely to contract, I have always liked to remain informed out of my own curiosity and interest. Thus, I have decided to write about malaria. Malaria kills more people than any communicable disease except for tuberculosis. It is caused by four species of parasitic protozoa that infect human red blood cells. Four different types of these protozoa are known: protozoa... VIEW DOCUMENT
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HIV Speech

1119 words - 4 pages HIV Speech It kills over 300,000 people a year. It can affect anyone regardless of your race, sex, or age. It cannot be seen, treated, readily detected or destroyed. It is capable of destroying millions of people without wars or violence. This thing is AIDS caused by the virus HIV-1. What would you do if you found out tomorrow you had AIDS? How would you react if a family member contracted the disease and was diagnosed with one to three years left to live? The HIV virus that causes AIDS began to affect the nation many years ago and was first discovered and documented by the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta, Georgia in 1979. It is an increasingly... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Real Vampire

652 words - 3 pages The Real Vampire"The Real Vampire" by Paul Barber brilliantly illustrates the fear that 18th century Europeans related to vampires. In every religion, we talk about the soul and passing onto another existence because death will always be a great mystery. While the modern-age vampire has become glorified through the works of Bram Stoker's Dracula, Universal's Bela Lugosi's portrayal on the big screen, or Stephanie Meyer's worldwide phenomenon The Twilight Saga,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Most important discovery by man

689 words - 3 pages Throughout the centuries, there have been many scientific discoveries which have played an important role for the betterment of the world. Although there have also been some that have changed the world for the worse. Some are well-known and instantly come to mind when one is asked to name the most important scientific discoveries of all time, but there are other weighty discoveries that are more refined in nature - ones that are easily overlooked, regardless of the tremendous impact they may have had on the world. One of such discoveries is antibiotics which have revolutionized today's medicine. Perhaps my choice will match up with yours, or maybe it will be vastly different.The... VIEW DOCUMENT
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management

1871 words - 7 pages IntroductionMankind has a fascination of travelling since the prehistoric time. The urge to explore new places and seek a change of environment is not new to human. The pursuit to discover something discrete was a conversion from the pursuit to discover something new due to the rapid advancement of technology. The diversity of culture and natural beauty of the world is supplying the sustenance to the tourism Industry moreover this industry is the essential support to the discovering nature of human. However, the explorative nature of mankind had made earth become a smaller place for this industry.... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Developing Health Policies

1173 words - 5 pages Health policies are developed and changed in order to improve access to care, control costs and expand quality. Each country will have its own challenges in accomplishing these goals dependent on the diversities of the population, including wealth, sanitation, education, location, and lifestyles. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) changed the payment methodology for Medicare Advantage plans to a model that provides resources based on the chronic conditions being cared for in the senior population. CMS had the three goals in mind with the creation of the Risk Adjustment Model. This policy change took ten years to implement fully. The difficulties and trials of developing health... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Creating a Safe Environment: 2 or 4 Year Old Children

1121 words - 4 pages Providing a healthy indoor and outdoor learning environment is a top priority in today’s society for all preschool teachers worldwide and very important for parents of young children, two to four years old as well. For this reason, when parents enroll their children in any type of early learning school program, they are expecting to have the best teachers who will protect and watch over their children while in their care, which all, will help benefit their child’s well-being in one way or another. Most parents want the classrooms, indoor and outdoor equipments and toys that their children engage in play with are safe and in the best condition for their individual use, that the child day... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Viral Infection: Influenza or Flu

1711 words - 7 pages Influenza or "flu" is a rather contagious viral infection that infects the respiratory tract. Fever, cough, muscle aches, fatigue, rhinorrhea, and sore throat are the symptoms commonly associated with influenza virus. Individuals infected with influenza normally experience mild illness and recover within two weeks. However, specific groups, such as the elderly, young children, and individuals with co-morbidities, appear more susceptible to severe illness as well as mortality due to influenza related complications. H1N1, a causative agent of influenza was identified in spring of 2009. Communication of H1N1 and seasonal influenza occur through droplets created when individuals with the illness... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Laws in Health Care

1204 words - 5 pages What is public health care and why do we need it? There is no clear definition of what public health care truly is, but many have made attempts to define the basic concepts that identify what public health care is and why we need it. Two of the most noted definitions of public health were developed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and Winslow, who base the definition of public health on what public health actually does and how it performs its functions:"…the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life, and promoting health and efficiency through organized community effort for the sanitation of the environment, the control of communicable infections, the education of... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Organic Farming

1394 words - 6 pages ABSTRACT This essay focuses mainly on the organic farming and its benefits in the Pacific Community. It outlines three major ways organic farming is seems beneficial in the Pacific community. First it states that it is eco-friendly or environmentally friendly, and promotes soil renewability and recycling. Secondly, it enhance the economy of a country depends entirely to be a more healthy one. It helps reduces urban rural migration. And... VIEW DOCUMENT
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health system in srilanka

1264 words - 5 pages HEALTH SYSTEM IN SRI LANKASri Lanka holds a unique position in South East Asia as of the first of the less developed nations to provide universal health, free education strong gender equality and better opportunity to social mobility. Since its independence, successive governments have implemented welfare oriented politics and programs which have allowed Sri Lanka to achieve relatively high standards of social and health development in comparison with countries of similar levels of economic development. As a result of this the country has made significant improvements in social welfare, both in the development of public health care and education... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Epidemiological Aspects of Aboriginal Health

3401 words - 14 pages Introduction Over the course of history, the state of Aboriginal health has deteriorated in a relation much similar to the culture’s struggle to survive in the ever-changing society. As a result, this state has changed from an ideal balance with nature during the days of their hunter-gatherer lifestyle, to the more disoriented form of endurance in order to cope with obligatory integration and open antagonism by other ‘modern’ communities (Grbich, 2004). This has led to an augmentation of the encumbrance of illness and death as well as diverse forms of morbidity that Aboriginal communities experience throughout their lives. It is indeed ironical that while under the context of an organized... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Biomedical Model of Health

1914 words - 8 pages The bio-medical model of ill health has been at the forefront of western medicine since the end of the eighteenth century and grew stronger with the progress in modern science. This model underpinned the medical training of doctors. Traditionally medicine had relied on folk remedies passed down from generations and ill health was surrounded in superstition and religious lore with sin and evil spirits as the culprit and root of ill health. The emergence of scientific thinking questioned the traditional religious view of the world and is linked to the progress in medical practice and the rise of the biomedical model. Social and historical events and circumstances were an important factor... VIEW DOCUMENT
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A Career as a Public Health Specialist

1244 words - 5 pages There is no doubt with the advances in technology that, as a population, we are continuing to live longer; yet with the cost of medical care constantly on the raise, is it any wonder an industry would develop out of the concept of “preventative” maintenance? We are after all, all too aware of this concept; from large corporations who strive to maintain their expensive equipment in an attempt to secure the bottom line, to the local neighbor who would rather afford the costs of preventative maintenance over the expense of replacing a broken down vehicle. To that effect, automobile manufacturers have even begun to include major necessary “preventative maintenance” items in their “owner’s... VIEW DOCUMENT
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A Career in Public Health

1276 words - 5 pages There is no doubt, with the advances in technology as a population we are continuing to live longer; yet with the cost of medical care constantly on the rise, is it any wonder an industry would develop out of the concept of “preventative” maintenance? We are all too aware of this concept. Everyone from large corporations who strive to maintain their expensive equipment in an attempt to secure the bottom line, to the local neighbor who would rather afford the costs of preventative maintenance over the expense of replacing a broken down vehicle. To that effect, automobile manufacturers have even begun to include major necessary “preventative maintenance” items in owner’s manuals. For... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Curing Viral Disease: Influenza

1144 words - 5 pages Influenza is a highly communicable or contagious acute respiratory infection. Although there are numerous influenza strains; there are 3 main types responsible for causing the flu. These are Influenza A, B, and C. These types can be further categorized by subtypes and strains of the virus. Broken down into the basics are: Influenza type A and B are responsible for respiratory illness; the flu or influenza (WebMD). Type C is actually a milder respiratory illness with little to no symptoms at all. In a human; the respiratory tract is lined by epithelial cells which cover from the nasal cavity to the air sacs of the lungs. The influenza virus infects the epithelial cells located in the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Blastomycosis

1154 words - 5 pages IntroductionThe healthcare of individuals within a community has been seen throughout human existence. People from every culture have concerns with events surrounding birth, death and illness. Human nature leads to the path of trying to understand prevent and control disease. Human beings' ability to preserve health and treat illness is dependents on the level of science, the availability of technology, and the degree of social organization (Stanhope & Lancaster, 2004, p. 24).When the community is small, some of the technology, and expertise that is readily available in a larger setting may not be accessible. The article this paper focuses on came from a small rural community... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Overview of Smallpox

1281 words - 5 pages One of the world’s most dreaded plagues for centuries, smallpox is now eradicated. Vaccination programs were pushed worldwide by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the disease was eliminated from the world. This push resulted in the last naturally occurring case in the world being almost 40 years ago. Once eradicated the once routine or mandatory vaccinations were stopped for the general public and it was deemed no longer necessary to prevent the disease. Although currently eradicated worldwide, two medical laboratory stockpiles still remain in Russia and the United States. With these stockpiles in existence the possibility of bio terrorism emerges and fear of these stockpiles... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Patients' Rights and Access to Medical Records

1010 words - 4 pages Patients' Rights and Access to Medical Records The confidentiality of patient visits and medical records are essential in providing the highest quality of health care. Under penalty of law, a patient's medical records or any other information regarding the patient may only be released with his or her authorization. Exceptions to this are certain cases specified by law for example, health care providers are required to report certain communicable diseases such as measles. Many organizations and laws have been developed to maintain patient's rights of confidentiality and access to their medical record. Guided by the principle that confidentiality is essential in developing strong trust... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Daycares

906 words - 4 pages Choosing what's best for you and your child Having a young child is a miracle to any parent, but they can also be very stressful. Parents are constantly worried about taking the right decisions that will benefit their child. That is why choosing an daycare for their child is a difficult choose that will or will not affect their child in the future. Many parents are not aware of the benefits that daycare have to offer to their child, as well as the differences between day cares and nurseries. It is very important for parents to realize that day cares are not for babysitting but are intended for the child to learn , as Leslie Williams , a Columbia professor of educations "Children need to... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Teburculosis:Making A Comeback

774 words - 3 pages Harlan Shay Dr. Eloise Perez English 1002 Tuberculosis: A Disease Making a Comeback Tuberculosis was once an untreatable disease that meant certain death for those infected. With the development of antibiotics the disease was brought under control and thought to soon be eradicated. Today TB, as it is more commonly referred to, "is the worlds's foremost cause of death from a single infectious agent"(Bloom 11). Why has tuberculosis returned to threaten the lives of millions? Tuberculosis is a disease capable of decimating the human population and has proven itself as such in the past. "By the mid-seventeenth... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Tuberculosis: A Disease Making A Comeback

772 words - 3 pages Dr. Eloise Perez English 1002 Tuberculosis: A Disease Making a Comeback Tuberculosis was once an untreatable disease that meant certain death for those infected. With the development of antibiotics the disease was brought under control and thought to soon be eradicated. Today TB, as it is more commonly referred to, "is the worlds's foremost cause of death from a single infectious agent"(Bloom 11). Why has tuberculosis returned to threaten the lives of millions? Tuberculosis is a disease capable of decimating the human population and has proven itself as such in the past. "By the mid-seventeenth century it was... VIEW DOCUMENT
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AIDS/HIV

686 words - 3 pages AIDS/HIVAcquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, better known as AIDS, iscaused by the incurable HIV virus. AIDS is a deadly disease that deterioratesthe immune system. There are two groups of HIV (humanimmunodeficiency virus), HIV-1 that occurs throughout the world and HIV-2that mainly occurs in Africa. The HIV virus enters the white blood cells andtakes over the reproductive system of that cell and uses the system toreproduce itself. The white blood cell dies and the new HIV cells infect otherwhite blood cells and repeat the process. The Person with the disease will... VIEW DOCUMENT