Happy Endings Margaret Atwood John And Mary Meet Essay Examples

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Pure Love in Happy Endings by Margaret Atwood

1139 words - 5 pages Pure Love in Happy Endings by Margaret Atwood Margaret Atwood, through a series of different situations, depicts the lives of typical people facing various obstacles in her short story “Happy Endings”. Despite their individual differences, the stories of each of the characters ultimately end in the same way. In her writing she clearly makes a point of commenting on how everybody dies in the same manner, regardless of their life experiences. Behind the obvious meaning of these seemingly pointless stories lies a deeper and more profound meaning. Love plays a central role in each story, and thus it seems that love is the ultimate goal in life. Love,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Margaret Atwood's Happy Endings: a Metafictional Story

958 words - 4 pages Happy Endings is an oddly structured, metafictional story; a series of possible scenarios all leading the characters to the same ending. Atwood uses humour and practical wisdom to critique both romantic fiction and contemporary society, and to make the point that it is not the end that is important, it is the journey that truly matters in both life and writing. Metafiction is fiction that deals, often playfully and self-referentially, with the writing of fiction or its conventions (website 1). Margaret Atwood is clearly mocking the conventions of romantic fiction throughout the entire story, beginning with the third line "if you want a happy ending, try A." Each scenario includes the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Importance of Gender Roles in "Boys & Girls" and "Happy Endings Part B": Munro vs. Atwood

1152 words - 5 pages Gender roles have changed significantly throughout time as illustrated in the short stories "Boys & Girls" and "Happy Endings Part B". These changes can be attributed to the implementation of women's rights, economic changes, and the way society is now educated on equality. In the 1930s two prominent female writers, Margaret Atwood & Alice Munro, dealt with how society is often responsible for shaping a person's ideas and beliefs about women. In her short story "Boys & Girls", Munro shows a young girl's struggle with traditional values to try and become a powerful female figure in the society. Atwood's "Happy Endings Part B" deals with how society and stereotypes make a young... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Of Happy Endings And Cinnamon Peels

1502 words - 6 pages ukessays.com http://www.ukessays.com/essays/english-literature/of-happy-endings-and-cinnamon-peels-english-literature-essay.php Of Happy Endings And Cinnamon Peels English Literature Essay Need help? ☎ 0115 966 7955 That man begins dying on the moment the first breath is taken at birth is a fact of life and is perhaps one of its greatest ironies. How well life is lived is a conscious decision everyone has to make throughout the journey from its beginning to life's inevitable end. In Happy Endings, Margaret Atwood (1983) tells a story about love and... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood

1304 words - 5 pages Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood As I first started to read ‘Oryx and Crake’, I was somewhat skeptical of whether or not I would enjoy reading it. The first chapter confused me with unusual words that I have never heard or seen before. Whenever I read something it is usually a book or magazine that I plan on reading or that is based on actual facts on a certain subject such as history or sports related. This book came as a surprise as I started to read it because it was not as hard to understand as I thought it would be and was actually quite enjoyable. The symbols in this book can mean many different things based on what the reader believes since religion plays a big part in it. ... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Margaret Atwood; Cat's Eye Analysis- Refraction and Self

1609 words - 6 pages "Our commonsense explanations of the world and ourselves are problematised by Atwood through her novel. Nothing is quite as it seems, when we look at anything (in a mirror, in the past, at others) it is refracted as if through water." Discuss the ideas and issues in the novel in relation to this statement, paying particular attention to the techniques and narrative elements used to show this.Our commonsense explanations of the world are based on the absolutes in our lives. Ways of seeing have been socially constructed embedded with values and attitudes that influence our behaviour and view of the world and ourselves. Reality cannot be captured and is interpreted differently by... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis and The Edible Woman by Margaret Atwood

1448 words - 6 pages Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis and The Edible Woman by Margaret Atwood The adolescent years are often associated with turbulence, illusion, and self-discovery; however, Kingsley Amis’s Lucky Jim and Margaret Atwood’s The Edible Woman demonstrate that more often than not, the twenties possess these qualities to a greater extent than adolescence. The age period of the twenties often consists of relationships, employment and self issues and using the premise of these uncertain times, Amis and Atwood effectively satire various societal systems. Moreover, Amis and Atwood both implement the use of the foil, a character who, by contrast with another character, accentuates that character’s... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Handmaid's Tale: A Reflection of the Past and Warnings for Future Generations Author: Margaret Atwood

6272 words - 25 pages Throughout history women have always been seen as inferior to men; they are stereotyped to be weaker, slower, and less intelligent. However, over time, women have fought for their rights, for their turn to speak, and for an equal society where landing a job is based on your resume and not your sex. Nowadays, women are seen as equals - doing what men can do, achieving what every man thought women could not, and some even surpassing men by becoming more successful, content and accomplished. The Handmaid's Tale, a dystopian novel, displays patriarchy and approaches what roles men and women have in the new society. When the VIEW DOCUMENT
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The theme of power and control as demonstrated through The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

2232 words - 9 pages It is necessary for the government to impose a certain amount of power and control on its citizens in order for a society to function properly. However, too much power and control in a society eliminates the freedom of the residents, forbidding them to live an ordinary life. In the dystopic futuristic novel, The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood demonstrates the theme of power and control through an oppressive society called the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Symbolism and Loss of Identity in The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

932 words - 4 pages Symbolism and Loss of Identity in The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood In Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, Offred recounts the story of her life and that of others in Gilead, but she does not do so alone. The symbolic meanings found in the dress code of the women, the names/titles of characters, the absence of the mirror, and the smell and hunger imagery aid her in telling of the repugnant conditions in the Republic of Gilead. The symbols speak with a voice of their own and in decibels louder than Offred can ever dare to use. They convey the social structure of Gileadean society and carry the theme of the individual's loss of identity. All the women in Gilead wear... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Heros in Gilgamesh by David Ferry and Offred The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood.

961 words - 4 pages What is a hero? In mythology and legend, a hero, is often of godly ancestry, who is gifted with great courage and strength, distinguished for his bold exploits, and favored by the gods. Or, a hero can be a person noted for feats of courage, mainly one who has risked or sacrificed his or her life. Finally, a hero can simply be the main character in a novel, poem, or dramatic presentation. There are many different types of heroes. This paper will focus on two, Gilgamesh from Gilgamesh by David Ferry and Offred from The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood. At first glance, Gilgamesh is the embodiment of a bad ruler. He is all knowing, prideful, tyrannical, and cruel.... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Distractions Through Language - Cites: Deborah Tannen, Alison Lurie, Stuart Hirschberg and Margaret Atwood

1326 words - 5 pages On a conscious level, a reader or consumer may look at an article and think, "That was interesting" or "Good point!" However on the subconscious level, the person will remember that specific product or idea simply because of what they read. The consumer is distracted by the overall "appearance" of the article or ad, and becomes digressed by it. The words have distracted them into thinking that they aren't looking at a product but simply a picture or piece of writing. I think that most commonly, language has a way of distracting the reader into thinking they see one thing, when really they are seeing another. There are many occasions where language can distract including false impressions... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Differences and Similarities Between Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro and The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

2393 words - 10 pages The purpose of this essay is to analyse and compare the narrative situations proposed by Franz Stanzel in the dystopian novels Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro and The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. For this aim, I am going to focus on the aspects focalization (reflection), relationship reader-narrator, narrative distance, knowledge, and reliability and demonstrate that they affect the interpretation of the novel by readers in a significant way. In the end, I will draw conclusions on how these techniques serve to alienate the narratives from their science fiction setting to set even more disconcerting issues about human’s existence. To start with, in both novels the narrator is... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Group Analysis of the Imagery, Symbolism, Figurative Language, Ironic Devices and more for "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood.

2709 words - 11 pages Imagery: Throughout the novel, "The Handmaid's Tale", Margaret Atwood presents an astonishing amount of vivid imagery and description that makes up the style and flow of the novel. Perhaps the first images present in the novel are that of light and dark. Listed in the table of contents, the reader can see that nearly every other section is entitled Night. Night is usually associated with darkness and fear, although to Offred this connotation is only half true. It seems that only in the dark can the characters of the novel move around and be "free" without the fear of being caught.... VIEW DOCUMENT
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This essay compares the treatment of women in the novel Handmaid's Tale (Margaret Atwood), and the country Afghanistan.

743 words - 3 pages Story of Gilead: Fact or FictionIn the year 2003, many people can not comprehend the historical implications of women's rights in the United States. It has been over a generation since women's movements toward equality tore down the barriers between men and women in the United States. Few people actually remember that up until 1919, women were not even allowed to vote in an election. Many people who live in the United States, might read The... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Quintessence of Humanity in The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood and Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

3013 words - 12 pages The Quintessence of Humanity Often in life, people take their freedoms, a gift that allows them to express their individuality, for granted. However, in the dystopian societies of The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood and Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro, people are reminded of just how easily their freedoms and humanity can be stripped away. Attwood and Ishiguro urge people to never lose sight of the core values that define who they are. The compelling novels chronicle the life journey of two protagonists as they fight to define their own existence and worth in life. Offred, the central character in The Handmaid’s Tale is exploited as a baby making machine, while Kathy, the leading... VIEW DOCUMENT
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CRITICAL ANALYSES OF FAT AND HAPPY, IN DEFENCE OF FAT ACCEPTANCE BY MARY R. WARLEY

777 words - 3 pages Fat and Happy, In Defense of fat acceptance is considered to be as a wake up call or a realization note for the fat people’s society. It’s not easy for a fat person to save his self from the society where fatness is a serious medical and socially unacceptable problem. Here the Mary R. Wary tells about the stereotypes of our society which fat people experience. But being a part of this society she believes that it is better to accept the reality that people have an equal right to live with full of pride as the thin people.The society believes that thinness gives self-respect to a person whereas; the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Wilderness in Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing, Mary Austin’s Land of Little Rain, and Gary Snyder’s

2702 words - 11 pages The Wilderness in Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing, Mary Austin’s Land of Little Rain, and Gary Snyder’s The Practice of the Wild Journeys into the wilderness test far more than the physical boundaries of the human traveler. Twentieth century wilderness authors move beyond the traditional travel-tour approach where nature is an external diversion from everyday life. Instead, nature becomes a catalyst for knowing our internal wilderness and our universal connections to all living things. In Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing, Mary Austin’s Land of Little Rain, and Gary Snyder’s The Practice of the Wild, “nature” mirrors each narrator: what the narrators ultimately discover in the wilderness reflects... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The position of women in the Canadian society: political rights and traditional expectations referring to the poems by Tom Wayman and Margaret Atwood.

1201 words - 5 pages Social class, status, and power are predetermined by one's gender. Within any patriarchal society, men simply possess greater power than women. Patriarchal thought produces male dominance, and authority within multiple areas, including politics. Throughout history, governments have designed laws to maintain such divisions of power, resulting in the oppression of women. Patriarchal power constructs sexual differences as political differences by giving legal form to the belief that women, because of their sex, are fit only to serve as wives and mothers.The main goal of the women's movement was basic citizenship rights for women. For decades, many of the first women's groups strived... VIEW DOCUMENT
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How are the main characters in "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood constructed to represent the text's underlying values and attitudes?

1514 words - 6 pages Fictional writing is rarely a neutral account; typically, characters are constructed to express a particular viewpoint. How are the main characters in "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood constructed to represent the text's underlying values and attitudes?Fictional texts are rarely constructed to present a neutral account;... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Book Report to the Class on A HANDMAID'S TALE by Margaret Atwood. May want to add more about the themes and take out some of the plot description.

1071 words - 4 pages Margaret Atwood, born in Ontario in 1939, has written several books, not just The Handmaid's Tale. Her most acclaimed novels were The Edible Women, which was her first novel, and was published in 1969 to wide acclaim, and The Blind Assassin, which won Great Britain's Booker Prize for Literature in the year 2000. However, her most widely known book is The Handmaid's Tale, which was published in 1986 and quickly became a best seller. It is now a staple of high school and college reading lists.The Handmaid's Tale is set in the near future in the fictional VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Hope and Hopelessness of Moira: "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood: Argumentative essay: Moira as a symbolic character of hope to the main character.

768 words - 3 pages Independence is what teenagers strive for while going through adolescence. Once achieved, this right of passage is one of the most difficult to surrender. Such strong defiance and independence is shown in Margaret Atwood's, "The Handmaid's Tale", through the minor character of Moira. This character is referred to throughout the novel as strong-willed and independent until Offred finds her near the end, different and broken. Through Moira, Atwood... VIEW DOCUMENT
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1984, by George Orwell, The Handmaid's Tale, by Margaret Atwood, and Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11 show fear as a way individuals dominate over other populace

2196 words - 9 pages Essay"Fear is a tool by which a dictator can seemingly become your friend" (Dr. Phil). This quotation signifies the advantage gained by dictators that control through fear. They are able to maintain the pretense of being a friend to those in fear because those in fear crave protection. Those in control can provide it. In the books 1984, by George Orwell and The Handmaid's Tale by VIEW DOCUMENT
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Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and John Milton's Paradise Lost

1845 words - 7 pages Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and John Milton's Paradise Lost “Forth reaching to the Fruit, She pluck’d, she eat:/ Earth felt the wound, and Nature from her seat/ Sighing through all her Works gave signs of woe,/ That all was lost […]” (PL 8. 781-784) In the gothic novel Frankenstein, Mary Shelley weaves an intricate web of allusions through her characters’ expedient desires for knowledge. Both the actions of Frankenstein, as well as his monster allude to John Milton’s Paradise Lost. Book eight of Milton’s story relates the tale of Satan’s temptation and Eve’s fateful hunger for knowledge. The infamous Fall of Adam and Eve introduced the knowledge of... VIEW DOCUMENT
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A Comparison of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

2149 words - 9 pages A Comparison of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck I will be comparing the novels ‘Frankenstein’ by Mary Shelley and ‘Of Mice and Men’ by John Steinbeck. I will focus on how the main outcasts in each book feel and how their emotions are presented and what effects this has on the reader. The novel Frankenstein is about a man Victor Frankenstein, who grew up in Geneva, Switzerland as an eldest son of a quite wealthy and happy family. His parents adopted an orphan Elizabeth, who later becomes his wife. Frankenstein wasn’t very popular although he had a good friend called Henry Cleval. At a young age he found the need to... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Margaret Atwood use of Language and Narrative Technique in The Handmaids Tale

1588 words - 6 pages From the outset of 'The Handmaids Tale' the reader is placed in an unknown world, where the rights and freedom of women have been taken away. We follow the narrative journey of a handmaid, named Offred. Throughout the first 15 Chapters we are provided with information, as narrated by Offred, with glimpses of her past life and her journey to the life she is now facing. These glimpses are not logical in their sequencing or chronological in the narration, therefore creating a feeling of disorientation among readers, a feeling matching that experienced by those living in this society. This also provokes many questions in the reader’s mind along with creating tension and expectation as to the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Defying the state? How is the concept of the individual against the state explored in the two novels 'Nineteen Eighty-Four' - George Orwell, and 'The Handmaid's Tale' - Margaret Atwood

2972 words - 12 pages Orwell's '1984' and Atwood's 'The Handmaid's Tale' are both novels that can easily be seen to be set in dystopian societies, Oceania and Gilead, in which the individuals are suppressed and relationships are carefully kept under control. The similarities between the two novels are visibly apparent and will be discussed. It could be said that the writers have created dystopian societies to protest against political movements in their own society or own world. They can be seen as a warning to future generations, showing how 'higher powers', such as Big Brother in 'Nineteen Eighty-Four', could attempt to control its citizens. However, as with all suppressive states both novels touch heavily... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Feminist Movement

1210 words - 5 pages Feminism is a significant theme addressed in many literary works of the contemporary period. In the 1800's and early 20th century, many women were oppressed and denied the right to equal opportunities that men were granted. However, after the active and significant role women played in World War II, a drastic change occurred. Women began to play a more respected and crucial role in society. Many women abandoned their expected roles as housewives and mothers and looked for other valued opportunities. This societal shift became a political movement and spawned the social theory of feminism. There was a momentous crusade for equal rights. Women were motivated to eliminate the gender... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Dangers of Conforming to Someone Else's Mind-Set

867 words - 3 pages Going along with someone’s beliefs is costly. When someone is open-minded, it is considered a positive investment in one’s growth. Removing one’s self from one’s ideas and way of life is another type of investment, one yielding high risk and little rewards. The incentive of being a part of something is very much worth the risk to many people. In the stories, “Just Walk on By” and “Happy Endings,” the tone is shared between Brent Staples and Mary B. who both conform to someone else’s mind-set for a sense of belonging. Whether a healthy love life or acceptance amongst peers, almost everyone is capable of falling victim to a very familiar vibe: nurturance. Insert respect to the equation and... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Atwood's Framing of the Story in "Alias Grace"

1768 words - 7 pages One of the main themes of the postmodern movement includes the idea that history is only what one makes of it. In other words, to the postmodern philosopher history is only a story humans frame and create about their past (Bruzina). Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace is an excellent exploration of this postmodern idea. Through use of postmodern writing styles and techniques, Atwood explores how the framing of a story influences its meaning. By mixing different writing mediums such as prose, poetry, period style letters, and historical documents such as newspaper articles, Atwood achieves a complex novel that explores a moment of history in a unique way. The different genres allow for the reader... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Are Happy Endings Possible?

1598 words - 6 pages We learned the term “happy endings” or “happily ever after” as young children by watching the famous and well-told love stories created by Walt Disney. Disney movies were simply made to portray magical and imaginative stories that conclude in happy endings. As a child, watching films such as “Aladdin,” “The Little Mermaid,” and “Pocahontas,” all give off feelings of pleasure and happiness in which have lead children to believe that anything is possible. Disney love stories fulfill in the idea that love is real, wonderful, and consists of no conflicts or troubles. It is noted that Disney’s love stories are actually based off of other love tales, but are created for the child state of mind.... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Theme of Estrangement, Feminism and the Use of Symbolism in Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing

1471 words - 6 pages Palacký UniversityFaculty of PhilosophyEnglish PhilologyThe Theme of Estrangement, Feminism and the Use of Symbolism in Margaret Atwood's SurfacingKAA/CS00Ondřej Andrle11th May 2014 The goal of this essay is to highlight a variety of themes in the novel Surfacing, as well as show the influence of Canada's cultural and geographic values on this book. The novel, presents notions of national and gendered identity, and stirred up concerns about conservation, preservation and... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Society in The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

2293 words - 9 pages “Atwood’s feminism is an integral part of her critical approach, just as her concept of criticism is inseparable from her creative work” Walter Pache (1). A dystopia is a fictional society, usually existing in a future time period, in which the condition of life is extremely difficult due to deprivation, oppression or terror. In most dystopian fiction, a corrupt government creates or sustains the poor quality of life, often conditioning the masses to believe the society is proper and just, even perfect. Most dystopian fiction takes place in the future but purposely incorporates contemporary social trends taken to horrendous extremes. The novel, ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’, by... VIEW DOCUMENT
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How does Margaret Atwood portray women in Alias Grace?

913 words - 4 pages A woman, especially if she has the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can-Jane Austen. Throughout Alias Grace Atwood explores the way in which women conceal certain aspects and modify others of themselves in order to ,quite literally, get away with murder. The preconception that women are stupid, harmless beings is one that leads to the downfall of many... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Case Study: The Mind of Alias Grace

1086 words - 4 pages In Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood, Doctor Simon Jordan is a psychologist that is analyzing and talking to convict Grace Marks with the ultimate goal of unlocking the truth behind the murder case of Thomas Kinnear and Nancy Montgomery. Parts of Grace’s memory are missing completely, and through constant discussions with Doctor Jordan about her dreams and memories from the past, Doctor Jordan is trying to find a way around the memory blocks while examining the validity of Grace’s claims and psychological state. Despite the fact Doctor Jordan is Grace’s link to mental stability and truth, Doctor Jordan needs just as much help as Grace does in finding himself, but his process of self-discovery... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Radical Feminism

1406 words - 6 pages Imagine waking up to the President and Congress being gunned down and the United States run by radical “Christian fundamentalist” (Beauchamp). In Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, this terrible scenario is not a dream, but a reality. Atwood admitted in an interview with Mervyn Rothstien of New York Times, “I delayed writing it for about three years after I got the idea because I felt it was too crazy.” Indeed, the dystopian society of the Republic of Gilead, once the United States, is a chilling thought but raises questions on the treatment of women in today’s society. The Handmaids Tale is a futuristic science fiction novel told by a Handmaid, a woman who sole purpose is to conceive... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Teenage Suicide in Death by Landscape

1041 words - 4 pages Teenage Suicide in Death by Landscape Margaret Atwood is the Canadian author of "Death by Landscape" which is a short story pulled from her novel, Wilderness Tips. This story highlights a huge problem in today's society, teenage suicide. Wilderness Tips was published in 1991, which is during the time of suicide "clusters" in the teenage population. These so called clusters began in the late 80's. Some experts indicate that suicide has always been a problem but was never seriously acknowledged until the late 1980's. Ms. Atwood incorporated this real life epidemic in her short story. Margaret Atwood is known for her effort to discuss real life matters in her writings. She... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Margret Atwood

1022 words - 4 pages Canada has had It's fair share of great author's like Farley Mowat, Steven King,Stanley Burke, and many more. But one Author that stands out from the rest is a woman who is not afraid to speak her mind. A feminise by the name of Margaret Atwood who has written poems, novels, short stories, children's books, and television scripts. Atwood was also the president of the writer's Union of Canada. Most would say that Atwood is the greatest Canadian writer of all time. Margaret Atwood was born in Ottawa, Ontario, on November 18, 1939. Because her father was a forest entomologist, Atwood spent most of her childhood living in the Canadian wilderness. During the eight months of... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Reality of Sex Slavery in the Present Day

1556 words - 6 pages In Margaret Atwood’s novel,  Oryx and Crake,  she  constantly  places the reader in an uncomfortable environment. The story takes place in a not so distant future where today’s world no longer exists due to an unknown catastrophe.  The only human is a man who calls himself the Abominable Snowman or Snowman for short, but in his childhood days his name was Jimmy.  If the thought of being all alone in the world is not uneasy enough, Atwood takes this opportunity to point out the flaws of the modern world through Snowman’s reminiscing about Jimmy’s childhood.  The truths exposed are events that people do not want to acknowledge: animal abuse for human advancement, elimination of human... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Feminism in Margaret Atwood's Cat's Eye

2996 words - 12 pages Feminism is defined as supporting the Equal Rights Amendment. Feminism interests in the “equality and justice for all women” and “seeks to eliminate systems of inequality and injustice” for all women (Shaw and Lee 10). The Equal Rights Amendment was presented into Congress in 1923 from the failure in referencing women and citizenship in the Fourteenth Amendment. If the Equal Rights Amendment passed, women would have the same equal rights as men. Women would also not be separated or singled out by other men. In the book Cat’s Eye, written by Margaret Atwood, Elaine Risley, who is the main character in the book, is an artist living within the Second World War to the late 1980’s,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Character Analysis of The Handmaid's Tale

1134 words - 5 pages Character Analysis of The Handmaid's Tale Moira ===== We first meet Moira "breezing into" (P65) Offred's room at college. She is the breath of fresh air. As Offred says, "She always made me laugh" (P66). One of her roles is to bring humour to the reader, to lighten the situation and contrast with the horror of the Gileadean regime. An example of this is when Moira changes the hymn "There is a Balm in Gilead" to "There is a Bomb in Gilead" (P230). Margaret Atwood uses imagery to illustrate the role of Moira's humour in giving hope to the handmaidens. She describes Moira as a "giggle; she was the lava beneath the crust of daily life" for the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Feminism in "Top Girls" and "The Handmaid's Tale"

1594 words - 6 pages Both Top Girls and The Handmaid’s Tale relate to contemporary political issues and feminism. Top Girls was written by Caryl Churchill, a political feminist playwright, as a response to Thatcher’s election as a first female British Prime Minister. Churchill was a British social feminist in opposition to Thatcherism. Top Girls was regarded as a unique play about the challenges working women face in the contemporary business world and society at large. Churchill once wrote: ‘Playwrights don’t give answers, they ask questions’, [6] and I think she is proving it in Top Girls: she brings up many tough questions over the course of the play, including what success is and if women’s progress in the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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'Homelanding' by Margaret Atwood

583 words - 2 pages I was in fact very confused by the way Atwood describes the condition of the earth to the outsider (or alien). Because when you start to explain something to someone, you assume that both of you must first know and agree with something together. This feeling started from Atwood’s description of a funeral: “When a person has achieved death a kind of PICNIC is held…”, I thought the word PICNIC quite hilarious, as if an alien would know what a picnic is in the first place. And then I recall having seen a movie about a girl making a documentary. A character referred to “documentary” as “a kind of movie, just boring”. It’s like when we are talking... VIEW DOCUMENT
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National Identity Crisis in Margaret Atwood’s Through the One-Way Mirror

806 words - 3 pages National Identity Crisis in Margaret Atwood’s Through the One-Way Mirror National identity is one of the most important factors in maintaining a country. It defines one’s nation, culture and everything associated with that country. When it comes to Canada, however, it seems that our national identity has been lost. In Margaret Atwood’s essay “Through the One-Way Mirror,” she effectively questions Canada’s national identity through symbolism and ambiguity. At first glance, this essay seems to be about American dominance in the Canadian-American relationship with its numerous powerful metaphors and extensive use of symbolism. However, after a more ... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace

1178 words - 5 pages Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace Margaret Atwood was born on November 18, 1939 in Ottawa, Ontario, and since then she has lived in various places such as Boston, London, France, Italy, Germany, and Alabama. She currently resides in Toronto. Atwood has written numerous poems, novels, short stories, children’s books, magazine articles, and works of nonfiction. She has also written three television scripts, and she has edited anthologies. Some of her well-known novels include The Handmaid’s Tale, Cat’s Eye, The Robber Bride, and Alias Grace ("Atwood"). Alias Grace is a fictional work based on the true story of Grace Marks, a servant who was accused of murdering her employer and his... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Manipulation...Disguised as Love

1477 words - 6 pages According to the Academy of American Poets, Margaret Atwood, was born Ottawa, Ontario in 1939. Margaret had both a Bachelor’s degree from Victoria College, University of Toronto as well as a Master’s degree from Harvard. Atwood is the author of more than fifteen books of poetry which have been translated into multiple languages as well as published in over twenty-five countries. Margaret has also received many honors for her work and was even named woman of the year for Ms. Magazine in 1986. Atwood has taught at many Universities and today resides in Toronto (Academy). Among her works is a poem called, Orpheus, a poem that alludes to the myth of Orpheus. Atwood writes the poem from the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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This Moral Decay

826 words - 3 pages We are going down. There's not a doubt in my mind that this is true. The deterioration of our society has been occurring since the beginning of time. However, it seems to me through things I've seen and heard, that this process has increased greatly in the 20th century. Our categorizations and stereotypes of people and groups, our "money-means-everything" approach to all that we do in our lives, and worst of all, our false notion that everything is alright, are just a few of the things which are destroying our freedom.In The Handmaids' Tail, Margaret Atwood portrays this... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Handmaids Tale In Novel And Film

3039 words - 12 pages The Handmaid's Tale in Film and Novel The Ceremony: the impregnation of the Handmaid, a compulsory monthly ritual at the beginning of the 21st century in the Republic of Gilead, the country formerly known as the United States of America. The dystopian novel The Handmaid's Tale, by Margaret Atwood presents a clear and understandable view of the Gilead society and the role of Handmaids therein, which the film adaptation by director VIEW DOCUMENT
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Margaret Atwood

2609 words - 10 pages Margaret Atwood Margaret Atwood is a widely recognized literary figure, especially known for her themes of feminism. Her novels, including Alias Grace and The Handmaid's Tale are widely known for their feminist subject matter, and one finds the same powerful themes within her poetry. Judy Klemesrud, in her article for The New York Times, once made the wise acknowledgement that "People follow her on the streets and in stores, seeking autographs and wanting to discuss the characters in her novels- most of whom are intelligent, self-absorbed modern women searching for identity. These women also suffer greatly, and as a result, some Canadian critics have dubbed her 'the high priestess... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Effect of the Sirens

1031 words - 4 pages The characters in Greek Mythology have multiple interpretations. Among these characters include the dangerous, yet gorgeous Sirens, bird-women who sit on a cliff singing bewitching songs that captivate the minds of innocent travelers and entice them to their deaths. In Homer’s The Odyssey and Margaret Atwood’s “Siren Song,” both poets provide different representations of the Sirens. Homer portrays the Sirens as irresistible in order to establish men as heroes, whereas Atwood depicts them as unsightly and pathetic so she can prove men are foolish and arrogant using imagery, diction, and point of view. Homer depicts the Sirens as intriguing and desirable because he considers Odysseus as... VIEW DOCUMENT
Discuss the quote "a memorable speech holds contemporary worth to society regardless of its time of presentation" with reference to 2 speeches of your choice. Comparing Dystopian Distress in Brave New World, Player Piano, and The Giver Feminism in Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale Analysis of Guy Vanderhaeghe's Short Story, "The Watcher" In relation to Margaret Atwood's essay "Survival: A Thematic Guide to Canadian Literature." Margaret Sanger RELIGION Handmaid's Tale. Is Atwood's novel ultimately a feminist work of literature or does it offer a critique of feminism? "Variations on the Word Sleep" By Margaret Atwood Jezebel's from The Handmaid's Tale The First Amendment/censorship. Analysis of literary features on Cat's eye by Margaret Atwood. North and South, irony, "pride and prejudice" and the class system. Alias Grace: Innocent or Guilty? Do the 'Historical Notes' in the Handmaid's Tale add to or detract from the novel? An Argument on whether or not The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood should be banned- Pro Dystopia Secrets of a True Geisha "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood. Characterization and Irony in Pride and Prejudice Essay on The Handmaid's Tale as a Warning to Society Women and Society Body Images The Story Within The Lyrics James Cook - Great European Explorer An Analysis of Margaret Atwood's Siren Song "Poetry allows poets to give form to experiences and feelings which are difficult to put into words" do you agree with this view? The Destructive Nature of Societal Expectations
From Childhood To Adulthood: Jimmy, Oryx, and Crake Discuss the ways in which two writers you have studied enhance their stories through the exploration and inclusion of lies, deception and betrayal. The Manipulative Sirens and Their Victims in Margaret Atwood's Siren Song Margaret Atwood - relationship between three of her poems. Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots Stereotypes in Women "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?" by Joyce Carol Oates "Rape Fantasies" by Margaret Atwood The Role of Women in Modern Society in Comparison To Margaret Atwood's "The Handmaid's Tale" "Mary Magdalene, apostle to the apostles or repentant sinner." Discuss. Hope in the Totalitarian Realm Coleridge, text of own choosing, and the Imaginative journey The Handmaid's Tale - by Margaret Atwood Prompt: Compare how different characters in the novel adapt to life under the new regime. (full title below) Queen Margot commentry on the handsmaid tale "To examine how Christianity influenced Mother Mary Helen MacKillop and the sisters of Saint Joseph to develop and change Australia's education system throughout the years of 1788-1900" Themes in the novel 'The Handmaids Tale' Analysis of the Edible Woman by Margaret Atwood The Iceman Cometh by Eugene O'Neill Science and Realism Alice Munro – A Master of Canadian Short Story Mary Shelley How People Use Their Imaginations to Explain Mysteries Imagery in the Handmaid’s Tale Survivors of the Donner Party Antonio Ricci Against John Wayne The Handmaid’s Tale