Happy Endings Margaret Atwood John And Mary Meet Essay Examples

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Pure Love in Happy Endings by Margaret Atwood

1139 words - 5 pages goal. It can be observed in this story that love is very powerful, so much so that it can drastically alter lives. Love can also lead to irrational decisions with horrific consequences. Atwood uses two distinct examples in “Happy Endings” to confirm this notion. Story B presents the character Mary, a woman madly in love with John. John, however, feels no emotion towards Mary, but rather "uses her body for selfish pleasure and ego gratification of a tepid kind.(Atwood)" Mary loves John so much that she has sex with him twice a week, despite the fact that she does not enjoy the act. “She acts as if she’s dying for [sex] every time, not because she VIEW DOCUMENT
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Margaret Atwood's Happy Endings: a Metafictional Story

958 words - 4 pages words. The "stretch in between...is the hardest to do anything with" is doctrine that applies to fiction writing as much as it does to life. With the statement "[plots] are just one thing after another, a what and a what and a what. Now try How and Why" Atwood is solidifying her case that it is not the ending that matters, it is how we, or the characters get there. The ending is unimportant because no matter how you slice it, "John and Mary die. John and Mary die. John and Mary die." And so do the rest of us. Sources: Margaret Atwood: "Happy Endings" from Good Bones and Simple Murders, 1983, 1992, 1994 O.W. Toad Ltd. Web site 1: Source: The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company- (definition of metafiction) VIEW DOCUMENT
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Importance of Gender Roles in "Boys & Girls" and "Happy Endings Part B": Munro vs. Atwood

1152 words - 5 pages a man. They go through different paths but both eventually come to the same finishing point. The narrator went from a young girl who believed she could do whatever she wanted to learning the painful truth that she would be no different from her mother, in being a stay at home wife. Mary had only one goal in life and that was to be with John, when that couldn't happen she took her life. Both characters struggle with their atmosphere and society, and ultimately fall into the same stereotypes.Work Cited:Atwood, Margaret "Happy Endings Part B" Introduction to Introduction. Fifth Edition. Findlay, I ET all. Canada, 2004. 511-512Munro, Alice "Boys & Girls" Introduction to Introduction. Fifth Edition. Findlay, I ET all. Canada, 2004. 491-502Munro, Alice "Boys & Girls" A Study Guide from Gale's "Short Stories for Students". Fifth Edition. The Gale Group, 2002. 28-40 VIEW DOCUMENT
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Of Happy Endings And Cinnamon Peels

1502 words - 6 pages survived the calamity and the one where Fred has a bad heart and the story ends inevitably the same. Atwood also suggested that the reader may become as adventurous as possible and portray John as a revolutionist and Mary a spy and yet the end will be just the same. Happy Endings tells the reader that what is important in a story just as much as in life is neither the beginning nor the ending but what is in the middle that matters most. It is the span of time in between the moment man takes his first and last breath that matters. Atwood though shared that beginnings are fun but true connoisseurs, those who has a passion for life favor what is in between because this is the part VIEW DOCUMENT
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Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood

1304 words - 5 pages Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood As I first started to read ‘Oryx and Crake’, I was somewhat skeptical of whether or not I would enjoy reading it. The first chapter confused me with unusual words that I have never heard or seen before. Whenever I read something it is usually a book or magazine that I plan on reading or that is based on actual facts on a certain subject such as history or sports related. This book came as a surprise as I started to read it because it was not as hard to understand as I thought it would be and was actually quite enjoyable. The symbols in this book can mean many different things based on what the reader believes since religion plays a big part in it VIEW DOCUMENT
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Margaret Atwood; Cat's Eye Analysis- Refraction and Self

1609 words - 6 pages individual as if refracted through water. Cat's Eye is a work of influential English by author Margaret Atwood. The novel's central area of exploration is of different versions of reality, and the accuracy and truthfulness of our own visions of how we see the world and ourselves. These visions are problematised by Atwood, as she uses various techniques that allow her to discretely proffer her idea of 'nothing is quite as it seems' to position the audience. This results in our own endorsement of these beliefs, and leads us to question our own lives as just a version of reality, with a sense of disillusionment. Our world and our own lives are challenged by Atwood's novel, as in questioning the idea VIEW DOCUMENT
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Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis and The Edible Woman by Margaret Atwood

1448 words - 6 pages Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis and The Edible Woman by Margaret Atwood The adolescent years are often associated with turbulence, illusion, and self-discovery; however, Kingsley Amis’s Lucky Jim and Margaret Atwood’s The Edible Woman demonstrate that more often than not, the twenties possess these qualities to a greater extent than adolescence. The age period of the twenties often consists of relationships, employment and self issues and using the premise of these uncertain times, Amis and Atwood effectively satire various societal systems. Moreover, Amis and Atwood both implement the use of the foil, a character who, by contrast with another character, accentuates that VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Handmaid's Tale: A Reflection of the Past and Warnings for Future Generations Author: Margaret Atwood

6272 words - 25 pages collective forms of prostitution are available only to Commanders to alleviate themselves from sexual repression. There, Offred spots Moira, a close college friend she last saw before Gilead split them up and with their hand signals, they meet up with one another where Moira tells Offred about her esacpe. "'I thought it might be the end, for me. Or back to the Center.....If I'd had my tubes tied years ago, I wouldn't even have needed the operation. Nobody in here with viable ovaries either, you can see what kind of problems it would cause'"(Atwood 312-313). After Moira and Offred got separated, Moira decides to escape underground with the help of people who refuse to work with Gilead, mostly VIEW DOCUMENT
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Symbolism and Loss of Identity in The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

932 words - 4 pages Symbolism and Loss of Identity in The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood In Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, Offred recounts the story of her life and that of others in Gilead, but she does not do so alone. The symbolic meanings found in the dress code of the women, the names/titles of characters, the absence of the mirror, and the smell and hunger imagery aid her in telling of the repugnant conditions in the Republic of Gilead. The symbols speak with a voice of their own and in decibels louder than Offred can ever dare to use. They convey the social structure of Gileadean society and carry the theme of the individual's loss of identity. All the women in Gilead wear color VIEW DOCUMENT
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The theme of power and control as demonstrated through The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

2232 words - 9 pages It is necessary for the government to impose a certain amount of power and control on its citizens in order for a society to function properly. However, too much power and control in a society eliminates the freedom of the residents, forbidding them to live an ordinary life. In the dystopic futuristic novel, The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood demonstrates the theme of power and control through an oppressive society called the Republic of Gilead. The government establishes power and control through the use of the Wall, military control, the Salvaging, and the Particicution. The Aunts indoctrinate the Handmaids and control them by using fear and intimidation. The Patriarchal society allows VIEW DOCUMENT
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Distractions Through Language - Cites: Deborah Tannen, Alison Lurie, Stuart Hirschberg and Margaret Atwood

1326 words - 5 pages specific words or phrases, connotative language in ads, and even the body language and the "language of clothes."One form of distraction lies in the misinterpretation of words. Simply based on a person's upbringing, they may interpret a word to mean one thing, when really it is intended to mean something completely different. In the article titled "Pornography," written by Margaret Atwood, she discusses this exact point. While delivering a speech, she used the word "pornography" in reference to sadistic rituals performed on males and females. However the press understood this word only by its more connotative definition of "naked bodies and sex." This misunderstanding led to a few problems VIEW DOCUMENT
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Heros in Gilgamesh by David Ferry and Offred The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

961 words - 4 pages What is a hero? In mythology and legend, a hero, is often of godly ancestry, who is gifted with great courage and strength, distinguished for his bold exploits, and favored by the gods. Or, a hero can be a person noted for feats of courage, mainly one who has risked or sacrificed his or her life. Finally, a hero can simply be the main character in a novel, poem, or dramatic presentation. There are many different types of heroes. This paper will focus on two, Gilgamesh from Gilgamesh by David Ferry and Offred from The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood. At first glance, Gilgamesh is the embodiment of a bad ruler. He is all knowing, prideful, tyrannical, and cruel. For example VIEW DOCUMENT
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Differences and Similarities Between Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro and The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

2393 words - 10 pages The purpose of this essay is to analyse and compare the narrative situations proposed by Franz Stanzel in the dystopian novels Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro and The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. For this aim, I am going to focus on the aspects focalization (reflection), relationship reader-narrator, narrative distance, knowledge, and reliability and demonstrate that they affect the interpretation of the novel by readers in a significant way. In the end, I will draw conclusions on how these techniques serve to alienate the narratives from their science fiction setting to set even more disconcerting issues about human’s existence. To start with, in both novels the narrator is VIEW DOCUMENT
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Group Analysis of the Imagery, Symbolism, Figurative Language, Ironic Devices and more for "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood

2709 words - 11 pages Imagery: Throughout the novel, "The Handmaid's Tale", Margaret Atwood presents an astonishing amount of vivid imagery and description that makes up the style and flow of the novel. Perhaps the first images present in the novel are that of light and dark. Listed in the table of contents, the reader can see that nearly every other section is entitled Night. Night is usually associated with darkness and fear, although to Offred this connotation is only half true. It seems that only in the dark can the characters of the novel move around and be "free" without the fear of being caught. It's in the darkness of her room that Offred remembers her life prior to the Gilead regime, often recalling her VIEW DOCUMENT
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This essay compares the treatment of women in the novel Handmaid's Tale (Margaret Atwood), and the country Afghanistan

743 words - 3 pages them to become insubordinate or independent and thereby undermine their husbands or the state. The society that Gilead portrays can be considered a mirror to the way of life in select Middle Eastern countries such as Afghanistan. The author (Margaret Atwood) has created a novel, which can be considered a fictional interpretation to the harshness of society in Afghanistan toward women.From the opening chapters of The Handmaid's Tale we catch a glimpse into the overwhelmingly harsh society that is Gilead. The narrator Offred, explains that she is held at a guarded facility, where the violation of basic human rights would be an understatement. In an attempt to combat under population, women are VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Quintessence of Humanity in The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood and Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

3013 words - 12 pages Never Let Me Go are as different as they are the same; nonetheless, the passionate Atwood along with the melancholy Ishiguro exquisitely capture the essence of being human into the heart of the two novels. The heroines show through their past memories, their never yielding hope for the future, and their need for love, acceptance, and friendship that they are humans. The discovery and eventual acceptance of humanity marks the beginning of what a hero must embody, as they overcome whatever life throws in their way, in the end, however, only true heroes are able to embrace their fate. Works Cited Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Cape: McClelland & Stewart, 1985. Print. Donne, John. "Meditation XVII." Devotions upon Emergent Occasions. 1624. Print. Ishiguro, Kazuo. Never Let Me Go. Toronto: Vintage Canada, 2006. Print. VIEW DOCUMENT
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CRITICAL ANALYSES OF FAT AND HAPPY, IN DEFENCE OF FAT ACCEPTANCE BY MARY R. WARLEY

777 words - 3 pages Fat and Happy, In Defense of fat acceptance is considered to be as a wake up call or a realization note for the fat people’s society. It’s not easy for a fat person to save his self from the society where fatness is a serious medical and socially unacceptable problem. Here the Mary R. Wary tells about the stereotypes of our society which fat people experience. But being a part of this society she believes that it is better to accept the reality that people have an equal right to live with full of pride as the thin people.The society believes that thinness gives self-respect to a person whereas; the fatness is something from which a person needs to get rid off. Instead of believing VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Wilderness in Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing, Mary Austin’s Land of Little Rain, and Gary Snyder’s

2702 words - 11 pages and our connectedness. Nature functions as catalyst, as guide, as test, as teacher. Then opening the spiritual window to grace, we ultimately realize the possibility of being fully human. References Atwood, Margaret. Surfacing (New York: Fawcett Crest, 1972). Austin, Mary. Stories from the Country of Lost Borders. Ed. Marjorie Pryse (New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 1987). Pryse, Marjorie. "Introduction" to Stories from the Country of Lost Borders by Mary Austin. (New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 1987). Snyder, Gary. The Practice of the Wild (San Francisco: North Point Press, 1990). VIEW DOCUMENT
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The position of women in the Canadian society: political rights and traditional expectations referring to the poems by Tom Wayman and Margaret Atwood

1201 words - 5 pages anything else apart from a mere housewife."Another Poem About the Madness of Women" by Tom Wayman and "This is a Photograph of Me" by Margaret Atwood present us with disturbing and touching images of women trapped in their own houses and women who are in a terrible struggle to recover their identity as complete human beings. Tom Wayman depicts a woman demented by the repetitive work she performs in her house. The society, and even her family, is blind to her basic human need for freedom. It is a woman whose husband and children devise a treatment of her madness, which consists in her passing through a department store, and getting out through the door which open on the opposite side of the VIEW DOCUMENT
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How are the main characters in "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood constructed to represent the text's underlying values and attitudes?

1514 words - 6 pages Fictional writing is rarely a neutral account; typically, characters are constructed to express a particular viewpoint. How are the main characters in "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood constructed to represent the text's underlying values and attitudes?Fictional texts are rarely constructed to present a neutral account; instead authors construct their texts to represent particular viewpoints. These viewpoints are manifested through the author's construction of the main characters and the attitudes and values they represent. The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood is one such text that utilises characterisation in order to convey the underlying attitudes and values presented. The VIEW DOCUMENT
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Book Report to the Class on A HANDMAID'S TALE by Margaret Atwood. May want to add more about the themes and take out some of the plot description

1071 words - 4 pages Margaret Atwood, born in Ontario in 1939, has written several books, not just The Handmaid's Tale. Her most acclaimed novels were The Edible Women, which was her first novel, and was published in 1969 to wide acclaim, and The Blind Assassin, which won Great Britain's Booker Prize for Literature in the year 2000. However, her most widely known book is The Handmaid's Tale, which was published in 1986 and quickly became a best seller. It is now a staple of high school and college reading lists.The Handmaid's Tale is set in the near future in the fictional Republic of Gilead, which is started after "they shot the [US] president and machine gunned the Congress and the army declared a state of VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Hope and Hopelessness of Moira: "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood: Argumentative essay: Moira as a symbolic character of hope to the main character

768 words - 3 pages Independence is what teenagers strive for while going through adolescence. Once achieved, this right of passage is one of the most difficult to surrender. Such strong defiance and independence is shown in Margaret Atwood's, "The Handmaid's Tale", through the minor character of Moira. This character is referred to throughout the novel as strong-willed and independent until Offred finds her near the end, different and broken. Through Moira, Atwood is able to develop Offred as a dependent on hope and further develop the theme of hopelessness in Totalitarian governments.Throughout the novel, Offred makes references to Moira, Offreds friend since college. Every time this character is mentioned VIEW DOCUMENT
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1984, by George Orwell, The Handmaid's Tale, by Margaret Atwood, and Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11 show fear as a way individuals dominate over other populace

2196 words - 9 pages Essay"Fear is a tool by which a dictator can seemingly become your friend" (Dr. Phil). This quotation signifies the advantage gained by dictators that control through fear. They are able to maintain the pretense of being a friend to those in fear because those in fear crave protection. Those in control can provide it. In the books 1984, by George Orwell and The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood, control through fear is demonstrated repeatedly through fear of the Aunts in The Handmaid's Tale and fear of other authority in 1984. This fear that each respective society feels has been taken advantage of by the dictators of the region for their own benefits. Michael Moore's documentary, 9/11 VIEW DOCUMENT
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Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and John Milton's Paradise Lost

1845 words - 7 pages Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and John Milton's Paradise Lost “Forth reaching to the Fruit, She pluck’d, she eat:/ Earth felt the wound, and Nature from her seat/ Sighing through all her Works gave signs of woe,/ That all was lost […]” (PL 8. 781-784) In the gothic novel Frankenstein, Mary Shelley weaves an intricate web of allusions through her characters’ expedient desires for knowledge. Both the actions of Frankenstein, as well as his monster allude to John Milton’s Paradise Lost. Book eight of Milton’s story relates the tale of Satan’s temptation and Eve’s fateful hunger for knowledge. The infamous Fall of Adam and Eve introduced the knowledge of VIEW DOCUMENT
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A Comparison of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

2149 words - 9 pages A Comparison of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck I will be comparing the novels ‘Frankenstein’ by Mary Shelley and ‘Of Mice and Men’ by John Steinbeck. I will focus on how the main outcasts in each book feel and how their emotions are presented and what effects this has on the reader. The novel Frankenstein is about a man Victor Frankenstein, who grew up in Geneva, Switzerland as an eldest son of a quite wealthy and happy family. His parents adopted an orphan Elizabeth, who later becomes his wife. Frankenstein wasn’t very popular although he had a good friend called Henry Cleval. At a young age he found the need to VIEW DOCUMENT
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Margaret Atwood use of Language and Narrative Technique in The Handmaids Tale

1588 words - 6 pages From the outset of 'The Handmaids Tale' the reader is placed in an unknown world, where the rights and freedom of women have been taken away. We follow the narrative journey of a handmaid, named Offred. Throughout the first 15 Chapters we are provided with information, as narrated by Offred, with glimpses of her past life and her journey to the life she is now facing. These glimpses are not logical in their sequencing or chronological in the narration, therefore creating a feeling of disorientation among readers, a feeling matching that experienced by those living in this society. This also provokes many questions in the reader’s mind along with creating tension and expectation as to VIEW DOCUMENT
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Defying the state? How is the concept of the individual against the state explored in the two novels 'Nineteen Eighty-Four' - George Orwell, and 'The Handmaid's Tale' - Margaret Atwood

2972 words - 12 pages Handmaid's Tale', reacts against religious fundamentalism and sexist views; Atwood grew up in a very feminist society with abortion being legalised and more women's rights. However, while the western world was giving women equal rights, the Islamic world was becoming more oppressive; hence Atwood believed a warning tool was needed. The novel could be said to be an act of rebellion in itself against these societies. Each novel equally focuses on the individual, as the protagonist's story is the one being told, whether it is through first hand narrative such as in "The Handmaid's Tale" or through the third person narrative that focuses entirely on Winston, and his beliefs in "Nineteen Eighty VIEW DOCUMENT
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Feminist Movement

1210 words - 5 pages works. Atwood portrays a realistic view and illustration of women in society, focusing on the ways in which females are hindered and victimized by gender-typing and stereotypes. In the prose, "Happy Endings," Atwood mocks and argues against the traditional fairy tale of the ideal relationship between men and women. She challenges the stereotypical characterization of men and women through different scenarios, using satire to poke fun at society's flawed misconceptions about relationships between the sexes. In scenario A, the ideal husband and wife, John and Mary, live happily in their nice house, have interesting careers, two children, an active social life, and are able to retire living out VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Dangers of Conforming to Someone Else's Mind-Set

867 words - 3 pages (in street clothes) and others while on the subway platform in the evenings. Brent takes on an extra friendly, yet agreeable tenor whenever pulled over by police. Brent also showcases his whistling talents with others during those late evening walks. He whistles numbers from Beethoven and Vivaldi, to alert others in the area that he is a safe, law-abiding, tax-paying citizen just like them. Brent wanted to be looked at as plain and not menacing in his environment, so he adopted some irregular habits to fit in. He molded himself in the image of what others thought a safe black man should be. He conforms just like Mary B., but the major difference lies in Brent changing with his personal survival in mind. Mary B. was willing to do anything even if it cost her own life. Works Cited Atwood, Margaret. “Happy Endings.” Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. Ed. X. J. Kennedy and Dana Gioia. 11th ed. New York: Longman, 2010. 482-85. Print. VIEW DOCUMENT
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Atwood's Framing of the Story in "Alias Grace"

1768 words - 7 pages One of the main themes of the postmodern movement includes the idea that history is only what one makes of it. In other words, to the postmodern philosopher history is only a story humans frame and create about their past (Bruzina). Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace is an excellent exploration of this postmodern idea. Through use of postmodern writing styles and techniques, Atwood explores how the framing of a story influences its meaning. By mixing different writing mediums such as prose, poetry, period style letters, and historical documents such as newspaper articles, Atwood achieves a complex novel that explores a moment of history in a unique way. The different genres allow for the reader VIEW DOCUMENT
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Are Happy Endings Possible?

1598 words - 6 pages today is that people do not know how to differentiate between love and lust. Several forms of mass media including songs, motion pictures, television shows, music videos, and commercials all sell the idea that having casual sex with someone is also equivalent to being in love. Being infatuated with someone does not mean that you love them. Having sexual intercourse with someone constantly does not show your true affection for him or her, especially when the words “I love you” cease to exist. In the second scenario within “Happy Endings,” Mary is in love with John and is willing to do anything and everything for him. Mary believes that if she has sex with him all the time, then he will VIEW DOCUMENT
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Literary Analysis and Comparison of Ulysses and the Sirens and “Siren Song”

1327 words - 5 pages journey home. Author Margaret Atwood and artist John William Waterhouse both display their brilliant ideas about the myth of Odysseus and the sirens using poetry and painting. Both Ulysses and the Sirens by John William Waterhouse and “Siren Song” by Margaret Atwood use the myth of the sirens to show that during their lives, people often encounter bad temptations that can lead to their demise and should pay no attention to such temptations. Margaret Atwood wrote and published “Siren Song” in 1974. The poem vividly describes a siren singing a song about a different song, which is irresistible to men. The siren narrating the poem cunningly pretends to sing a harmless song that is actually the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Society in The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

2293 words - 9 pages Margaret Atwood focuses on the choices made by those controlling the society of Gilead in which increasing the population and preservation of mankind is the main objective, instead of freedom or happiness. The society has undergone many physical changes that have extreme psychological consequences. I believe Atwood sees Gilead as the result of attitudes and events in the early 1980s, which have spiralled out of control. ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ reflects Atwood’s views and critiques on civilisation. In an interview with Gabriele Metzler Atwood says, “There is nothing in the book that hasn’t already happened. All things described in the book people have already done to each other”(2 VIEW DOCUMENT
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Aaaaaaaaa

3365 words - 14 pages "Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend.Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read." Groucho Marx, 1890-1977 Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood As discussed at Lynn's townhouse, Wednesday, March 15, 2000 We've discovered the secret to a successful book club meeting: Skittles. And lots of 'em. Oh yes, and a really great book that we all loved doesn't hurt either.Attendees: Lynn Jatania (chair, hostess) Krista Appel (minutes, advocate) Moira Grunwell (advocate) Mike Reade Jen Roundel Ellen Birnbaum Izabela Palczak The Highlights Lynn began the meeting by providing background information on Atwood, Alias Grace, and Susanna Moodie.Book discussion followed -- although we all really liked the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Case Study: The Mind of Alias Grace

1086 words - 4 pages In Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood, Doctor Simon Jordan is a psychologist that is analyzing and talking to convict Grace Marks with the ultimate goal of unlocking the truth behind the murder case of Thomas Kinnear and Nancy Montgomery. Parts of Grace’s memory are missing completely, and through constant discussions with Doctor Jordan about her dreams and memories from the past, Doctor Jordan is trying to find a way around the memory blocks while examining the validity of Grace’s claims and psychological state. Despite the fact Doctor Jordan is Grace’s link to mental stability and truth, Doctor Jordan needs just as much help as Grace does in finding himself, but his process of self VIEW DOCUMENT
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Margret Atwood

1022 words - 4 pages Canada has had It's fair share of great author's like Farley Mowat, Steven King,Stanley Burke, and many more. But one Author that stands out from the rest is a woman who is not afraid to speak her mind. A feminise by the name of Margaret Atwood who has written poems, novels, short stories, children's books, and television scripts. Atwood was also the president of the writer's Union of Canada. Most would say that Atwood is the greatest Canadian writer of all time. Margaret Atwood was born in Ottawa, Ontario, on November 18, 1939. Because her father was a forest entomologist, Atwood spent most of her childhood living in the Canadian wilderness. During the eight months of each VIEW DOCUMENT
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Radical Feminism

1406 words - 6 pages Imagine waking up to the President and Congress being gunned down and the United States run by radical “Christian fundamentalist” (Beauchamp). In Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, this terrible scenario is not a dream, but a reality. Atwood admitted in an interview with Mervyn Rothstien of New York Times, “I delayed writing it for about three years after I got the idea because I felt it was too crazy.” Indeed, the dystopian society of the Republic of Gilead, once the United States, is a chilling thought but raises questions on the treatment of women in today’s society. The Handmaids Tale is a futuristic science fiction novel told by a Handmaid, a woman who sole purpose is to conceive VIEW DOCUMENT
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Teenage Suicide in Death by Landscape

1041 words - 4 pages acknowledged by their loved ones. Margaret Atwood is a valued Canadian author. She was voted as NOW's magazine favorite 4 years in a row (Atwood 1). She has been writing since the age of five. She wrote comics and plays and even poetry. Her first published story came out when she was nineteen years old. Canadians adore good literature and she was always encouraged to write. Ms. Atwood has many publications in different genres. She has poetry, novels, and collections of short stories such as, Wilderness Tips. Bibliography: Works Cited Atwood, Margaret. "Reading Blind." The Story and It's Writer. Teenage Suicide. http://hithed.uregina.ca/chi/units/10.4.2/tbsuiloz.html Schleiter, Jay. Everything You Need to Know about Suicide. Rosen Publishing Group; New York, NY. 1997. Frankel, Bernard and Rachel Kranz. Teenage Suicide. Facts on File; New York, NY.1994. Margaret Atwood. http://www.web.net/owtoad.html VIEW DOCUMENT
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Feminism in Margaret Atwood's Cat's Eye

2996 words - 12 pages Feminism is defined as supporting the Equal Rights Amendment. Feminism interests in the “equality and justice for all women” and “seeks to eliminate systems of inequality and injustice” for all women (Shaw and Lee 10). The Equal Rights Amendment was presented into Congress in 1923 from the failure in referencing women and citizenship in the Fourteenth Amendment. If the Equal Rights Amendment passed, women would have the same equal rights as men. Women would also not be separated or singled out by other men. In the book Cat’s Eye, written by Margaret Atwood, Elaine Risley, who is the main character in the book, is an artist living within the Second World War to the late 1980’s VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Reality of Sex Slavery in the Present Day

1556 words - 6 pages In Margaret Atwood’s novel,  Oryx and Crake,  she  constantly  places the reader in an uncomfortable environment. The story takes place in a not so distant future where today’s world no longer exists due to an unknown catastrophe.  The only human is a man who calls himself the Abominable Snowman or Snowman for short, but in his childhood days his name was Jimmy.  If the thought of being all alone in the world is not uneasy enough, Atwood takes this opportunity to point out the flaws of the modern world through Snowman’s reminiscing about Jimmy’s childhood.  The truths exposed are events that people do not want to acknowledge: animal abuse for human advancement, elimination of human VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Theme of Estrangement, Feminism and the Use of Symbolism in Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing

1471 words - 6 pages Margaret Atwood's novel. In several passages of the novel, both the father and the daughter, who is looking for him in the surrounding woods, seem to be almost unable of stopping the wilderness from controlling their actions. At first, the narrator only admits such a possibility in connection with her own father who, as she fears, "might have gone insane. Crazy, loony. Bushed" (Atwood 64). She realizes that if 'bushing' truly is the case, the old man may be completely transfigured, unrecognizable even to her (Atwood 83) as the wilderness changes people both physically and mentally: "I wondered when it had started; it must have been the snow and the loneliness, he'd pushed himself too far, it gets VIEW DOCUMENT
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Character Analysis of The Handmaid's Tale

1134 words - 5 pages Character Analysis of The Handmaid's Tale Moira ===== We first meet Moira "breezing into" (P65) Offred's room at college. She is the breath of fresh air. As Offred says, "She always made me laugh" (P66). One of her roles is to bring humour to the reader, to lighten the situation and contrast with the horror of the Gileadean regime. An example of this is when Moira changes the hymn "There is a Balm in Gilead" to "There is a Bomb in Gilead" (P230). Margaret Atwood uses imagery to illustrate the role of Moira's humour in giving hope to the handmaidens. She describes Moira as a "giggle; she was the lava beneath the crust of daily life" for the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Feminism in "Top Girls" and "The Handmaid's Tale"

1594 words - 6 pages workplace has been a good or bad thing. Margaret Atwood is a Canadian feminist writer, who wrote The Handmaid’s Tale in times of the defeat of the Equal Rights Amendment, the rise of the religious rights, the election of Ronald Reagan and during the anti-feminist backlash in America of the 1980s. [9] The Handmaid’s Tale is a feminist dystopian novel, in which Atwood addresses the suppression of women in patriarchal culture. Atwood wrote The Handmaid’s Tale to illustrate what might happen in the future if anti-feminism goes to the extreme with claims such as 'it is every man’s right to rule supreme at home' and 'a woman’s place is in the home'. [7] She sets the story in a pseudo-religious VIEW DOCUMENT
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National Identity Crisis in Margaret Atwood’s Through the One-Way Mirror

806 words - 3 pages self-contradicting country who is not per-occupied with its internal issues and happenings. This explains Canada’s lack of national identity. Atwood offered no resolutions, but implicitly proposes that Canadians should take it upon themselves to determine their national identity Work Cited: Atwood, Margaret. “Through the One-Way Mirror.” Marianopolis College ENG-101 Introduction to College English C. Killam. 81-82. VIEW DOCUMENT
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Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace

1178 words - 5 pages possessed by the spirit of her friend Mary Whitney. As in much of twentieth century literature, no definite answers are given, and the reader is left to draw her own conclusions. Atwood’s ambiguity is similar to that of James Joyce’s in "The Dead" and Franz Kafka’s in "The Metamorphosis." In these and other twentieth century works, there are more questions raised than answers given. There is no known solution to the real mystery of Grace Marks, and Atwood leaves the solution to her character’s mystery to the reader’s interpretation. Clues are scattered throughout the novel, and any answer is possible. One can accept the spiritual answer that arises during the hypnotism or choose a more realistic interpretation. It is up to the reader to decide. Works Cited Atwood, Margaret. The Margaret Atwood Information Web Site. 21 Apr. 1999. . VIEW DOCUMENT
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'Homelanding' by Margaret Atwood

583 words - 2 pages surprises and meanings. It is vital to sometimes look at the routines and customs of us in another way (viewing “meat” as “muscle tissues” for example), and we will find many things that we care too much about less serious. “Take me to your leader”, for instance, shows the emphasis of “power and control” in human beings. Atwood would like to tell us that from an outsider’s point of view, many things are trivial, and many more things are worth more concern, such as the beauty of the nature.Bibliography:Homelanding by Margaret Atwood VIEW DOCUMENT
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Manipulation...Disguised as Love

1477 words - 6 pages According to the Academy of American Poets, Margaret Atwood, was born Ottawa, Ontario in 1939. Margaret had both a Bachelor’s degree from Victoria College, University of Toronto as well as a Master’s degree from Harvard. Atwood is the author of more than fifteen books of poetry which have been translated into multiple languages as well as published in over twenty-five countries. Margaret has also received many honors for her work and was even named woman of the year for Ms. Magazine in 1986. Atwood has taught at many Universities and today resides in Toronto (Academy). Among her works is a poem called, Orpheus, a poem that alludes to the myth of Orpheus. Atwood writes the poem from the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Exploring "Frankenstein" and Creator Mary Shelley

2208 words - 9 pages politics. Percy Shelley was a poet-philosopher and they soon became romantically involved. They would meet at Mary’s mother’s grave site and that is where they got to know each other and fell in love. Mary was only seventeen at the time and Percy was twenty-two years old and also married to Harriet. However this does not stop them, Mary becomes pregnant with their first child and are looked down upon for their actions. Mary lost her first child because she is born premature. Of course, Mary had a really hard time dealing with this and became depressed. About a year later, Mary would have her second child. It was a boy and his name was William. In 1816 Mary and Percy will get married VIEW DOCUMENT
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Margaret Atwood

2609 words - 10 pages Margaret Atwood Margaret Atwood is a widely recognized literary figure, especially known for her themes of feminism. Her novels, including Alias Grace and The Handmaid's Tale are widely known for their feminist subject matter, and one finds the same powerful themes within her poetry. Judy Klemesrud, in her article for The New York Times, once made the wise acknowledgement that "People follow her on the streets and in stores, seeking autographs and wanting to discuss the characters in her novels- most of whom are intelligent, self-absorbed modern women searching for identity. These women also suffer greatly, and as a result, some Canadian critics have dubbed her 'the high priestess VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Effect of the Sirens

1031 words - 4 pages The characters in Greek Mythology have multiple interpretations. Among these characters include the dangerous, yet gorgeous Sirens, bird-women who sit on a cliff singing bewitching songs that captivate the minds of innocent travelers and entice them to their deaths. In Homer’s The Odyssey and Margaret Atwood’s “Siren Song,” both poets provide different representations of the Sirens. Homer portrays the Sirens as irresistible in order to establish men as heroes, whereas Atwood depicts them as unsightly and pathetic so she can prove men are foolish and arrogant using imagery, diction, and point of view. Homer depicts the Sirens as intriguing and desirable because he considers Odysseus as VIEW DOCUMENT
Feminism In Literature How does Margaret Atwood portray women in Alias Grace? Feminism in Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale Analysis of Guy Vanderhaeghe's Short Story, "The Watcher" In relation to Margaret Atwood's essay "Survival: A Thematic Guide to Canadian Literature." A Play I Wrote for my "Modern Femininity" Class. Some people might find it offensive. It was in response to the assignment "Write a Creative Response to Changing Role of Males in Modern Parenting" Feminism In The Handmaid's Tale The Handmaid´s Tale: A Community Made of Classes A Comparison of Generational Conflicts in The Kiss and Marriage Is a Private Affair O. Henry The Black and White World of Atwood's Surfacing Betrayal: How It affects The Narrator in "The Space Merchants" and "The Handmaid's Tald" Stereotypes in Women "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?" by Joyce Carol Oates "Rape Fantasies" by Margaret Atwood Margaret Mary Bell of "Galatea" Handmaid's Tale. Is Atwood's novel ultimately a feminist work of literature or does it offer a critique of feminism? "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood Much Ado About Nothing Written Between 1598 And 1600 By William Shakespeare Science and Realism Abandoning Morals and Ethics: Oryx and Crake, Elizabeth Bathory The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood A Gradual Decline in Prejudice between Places and People in North and South The Environment and Margaret Wise Brown James Vance Marshall based his novel walkabout on this.In this novel Antonio Ricci Against John Wayne Women and Society Body Images Perils of Peer Victimization
The Handmaids Tale In Novel And Film Comparing Dystopian Distress in Brave New World, Player Piano, and The Giver Alias Grace: Margaret Atwood's Work of Historical Fiction Arthur Miller's The Crucible Holiday by Margaret Atwood John Muir, his achievements and his journeys Jezebel's from The Handmaid's Tale Discuss the quote "a memorable speech holds contemporary worth to society regardless of its time of presentation" with reference to 2 speeches of your choice What Happened to Freedom? - describing the influences that contributed to Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale and how it is a reflection of past societies and a warning future generations Comparison essay between Margaret Atwood's "This is a Photograph of Me" and "Morning in the Burned House" Alias Grace: Innocent or Guilty? Comparison of Three Short Stories from Michael Ondaatje's collection "From Ink Lake" A Good Man Is Hard To Find by Mary Flannery O’Connor Romanticism in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Analysis of the Edible Woman by Margaret Atwood 'Imaginative journeys always transform us in someway'. Explore this statement referring to Frost at Midnight, Journey to the Interior, and Sliding Doors Themes in the novel 'The Handmaids Tale' The Greatest Story Ever Told "How Does Margaret Atwood Portray The Role Of Women In The Republic Of Gilead?" How Nadine Gordimer Ends Her Stories An Analysis of Margaret Atwood's Siren Song The Handmaids Tale, by Margaret Atwood Gilead: Opposition is Futile A Nation of Indoctrination: "The Handmaid's Tale" Tragedy, Closure, and Society: Agamemnon