Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm Essay Examples

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Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm Essay

1172 words - 5 pages Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm The concentration of a healing hospital is to make an environment which aids to decrease the tension level of patients and their kin. When the patients are transferred to the hospitals they went through a lot of tension and anxiety like, frightening of the unknown, hurting therapeutic processes, modification in financial status because of the increasing expenses due to hospitalizing and are considerable as most hard times of their life. By careful self evaluation of the fact that spirituality is one of the greatest key factor in the healing recovery stage, the healing hospitals goal is to enhance overall wellness of the patients and their relatives like... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm Essay

1322 words - 5 pages What makes a hospital a place of healing? Is it the staff who works there? Is it the building or the interior, or perhaps the landscape? This paper will discuss the components of a healing hospital and its relationship to spirituality. It will discuss the possible challenges and barriers of creating a healing environment. A hospital must have all staff work together to promote a healing environment for its patients as well as the families and visitors who come thru its doors. These staff members include not only the doctors and nurses who care for the patients, but also the CEO and office staff all the way down to the groundskeeper. It is important that all of the employees of the facility... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Healing Hospital Paradigm Essay

1151 words - 5 pages The inception of the “Healing Hospital” is not new. Healing hospitals in various forms have been around throughout history. As hospitals were slowly taken over by religious orders they became more holistic concentrating on all aspects of healing including physical, mental, and spiritual. Instead of focusing on the patient as a carrier of disease and death they began to look at them as a person that has certain fundamental needs for existence. One of these needs as fore mentioned is spirituality. Spirituality simply defined “is that which relates to or affects the human spirit or soul as opposed to material or physical things. Spirituality touches that part of you that is not dependent on... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Benefits of Energy Medicine Essay

1371 words - 5 pages Healthcare industry has a giant place in economy, and medicine part of that industry is developing very rapidly because everyday people use medicines to prevent illnesses, to reduce stress, or to be more energetic. However, many people start to see disadvantages of conventional medicine because of its high costs and side effects. At this time, complementary and alternative medicine shows itself as a good alternative. It is not a type of conventional medicine because it has different ways for treatment, and has different products and practices. There are five types of complementary and alternative medicine which are alternative medical systems, mind-body interventions, biologically-based... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Religion, Spirituality, and Complementary Alternative Medicine

549 words - 2 pages Religion, Spirituality, and CAM (Complementary Alternative Medicine), can be related in many ways. Those who stand by their beliefs believe that God will heal all. Religion and spirituality is a major essential part of one’s’ health. They have included things such as prayer in healing, counseling, and the use of meditation. Spiritual issues make a difference in an individual’s experience of illness and health. With spirituality, the health care providers can learn to support the values for the art of healing. The health care provider must have respect for their patient’s religion. (Larry Dossey. Healing Words: The Power of Prayer and the Practice of Medicine. Harper Collins, San... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Nursing Philosophy and Nursing Theory Essay

1842 words - 7 pages Nursing Philosophy and Nursing Theory: A Comparison of the Metaparadigm Concepts of Nursing of Nursing with Personal Philosophy and the Theory of Madeleine M. Leininger Developing a personal philosophy of nursing and patient care is essential to the development of every nurse. The development of a personal philosophy begins in nursing school. Nurses incorporate our personal beliefs within our nursing practice and as we grow and mature as nurses and human beings our philosophy changes. Exposure to new beliefs, cultural differences, and researching the views of a variety of nursing theorists assist nurses in developing an expanding their own philosophy with the culture of care. Purpose ... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Laughter is a Medicine Remedy Essay

1134 words - 5 pages Nov. 1 2012T-TH @ 2pmTopic: "Laughter as a medicine"Specific Purpose: To persuade my listeners to laugh more.Central Idea: To persuade my listeners to understand how laughter can be a strong medicine for the mind; can help us stay emotionally healthy; and the social benefits of laughter.INTRODUCTIONLaughter can be infectious. Have you ever suddenly started laughing when you hear someone else laughing crazily, although you actually have no idea what their laughing about?Well, our five senses are not enough for ideal living. We need to use our sixth sense: our sense of humor. Humor is not merely telling jokes; it is the way we view the world.... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Saving Private Ryan Movie Analysis

554 words - 2 pages The opening battle of "Saving Private Ryan," is very accurate. Many historians believe that the opening scene is the closest anyone can get to actual World War 2 combat. For those who fought on the beach of Normandy, this film comes closer than any other to what those men went through in 1944. Other than the Germans, the movie leaves out every country except the Americans. "Saving Private Ryan," shows only the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Environmental Impact on Healing Essay

1344 words - 5 pages Usefulness of the Theory Human beings and the environment are always interacting and impacting each other. Therefore, it is imperative that as an Advance Practice Nurse (APN) one considers the physical, social, cultural and any other factors that may impact the environment as it relates to the patient. The primary goal of the Environmental Impact on Healing Theory is to promote awareness of the environment and its effect on the patient’s healing through the use of energy and altering the surrounding environment. By altering the environment positively and balancing the flow of energy, healing progression may be seen. Rogers defined a human being as unitary person irreducible and is... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Shamanistic Healing Essay

2124 words - 8 pages Shamanistic Healing Shamanistic healing, one of the oldest spiritual healing powers, has recently become a topic of interest in modern medicine. What is Shamanism? Shamanism is a mix of magic, folklore, medicine and spirituality that evolved in tribal and gathering communities thousands of years ago. Shamanic faith presumes that everyone and everything has a spirit which is a part of a greater whole, and that spirits affect all events, including illness and disease. In the tradition of Shamanism it is believed that certain people named shamans exhibit particular magical specialties at birth; the most common specialization is that of a healer. A Shaman is believed to have... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Biology of Prayer and Healing

1033 words - 4 pages The Biology of Prayer and Healing “When we set ourselves to the work of collecting or re-collecting the scattered pieces of ourselves, we begin a task which, if carried to its natural conclusions, ultimately becomes prayer.” Skepticism Science and Faith: Freud, one of the most well respected researchers of the human experience, claims that religion is a “universal neurosis that civilization substitutes for a more authentic personal reality based on scientific knowledge” (Jones and Butman, 1991, 77). Thus, to presume that illness and healing have anything to do with spirituality is absurd. Testability: Prayer and faith have no universal method of testing. Nor can it be... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Spiritual Diversity of Healthcare Providers: Different Perspectives from a Sikh, Tao and Catholic Health Care Provider

1878 words - 8 pages 1 Corinthians 9:22 To the weak I became weak, to win the weak. I have become all things to all men so that by all possible means I might save some (New International Version). This scripture stated by the Apostle Paul was used to declare his commitment, not only to God, but to mankind. His statement created a model not only for ministry but for healthcare. In a culturally diverse society it is important that each provider attempt to put the needs of the patient before their own in order to provide the best possible care. This is also true in a spiritually divers culture. Where there is not a need to completely understand the foundations of religious beliefs but the willingness to be all... VIEW DOCUMENT
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How "Triage" by Scott Anderson challenges us to examine our beliefs and assumptions about life.

980 words - 4 pages We all believe healing is easy. Healing is just a matter of time, and maybe a few pills. Healing is an effortless activity. "Triage", written by Scott Anderson, proves this common misconception wrong. The reader is displayed with examples of our natural tendencies to move away from sources of pain and complications. We are shown how we also tend to grow closer to people we believe can cure us. Anderson illustrates how willpower is an essential factor in healing, and... VIEW DOCUMENT
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aboriginal medicine

1952 words - 8 pages      Many of the inequalities in the health of the Aboriginal people can be attributed to the erosion of the Aboriginal culture.(chp.2). Restrictions placed on the cultural practices of the Aboriginal people ultimately led to the abatement of the Aboriginal traditional medicines.(p88). Losing their freedom to practice traditional therapeutics, the Aboriginal people eventually had to adapt to the culturally inappropriate ways of western medicines. The purpose of this paper is to examine the advantages of Aboriginal healing methods for the Aboriginal people, as well as to explain why these traditional methods continued to persist long after western style medicines... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Power of Therapeutic Touch

525 words - 2 pages The Power of Therapeutic Touch   Derived from several ancient healing practices, therapeutic touch is based on the theory of human energy fields - every person has an energy field that surrounds the entire body. During therapeutic touch treatment, practitioners use their hands, without actually touching the person, to re-establish a healthy energy flow. Therapeutic touch seeks to restore balance within the body while also stimulating the patient's own healing response. The practice of therapeutic touch is used worldwide in thousands of hospitals, clinics, and private practices. It is an easily learned, successful complement to other healing programs.   Therapeutic touch... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Incorporating the Metaparadigm of Nursing with the Theory of Caring

1573 words - 6 pages I. Introduction The purpose of this paper is to present a personal belief about the metaparadigm of nursing and to incorporate it into that of Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring. II. Personal Belief on the Paradigm Every person’s needs must be recognized, respected, and filled if he or she must attain wholeness. The environment must attuned to that wholeness for healing to occur. Healing must be total or holistic if health must be restored or maintained. And a nurse-patient relationship is the very foundation of nursing (Conway et al 2011; Johnson, 2011). The Theory recognizes a person’s needs above all. It sets up the conducive environment to healing. It addresses and works... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Experiencing True Love

2952 words - 12 pages INTRODUCTION There are so many people in the world today who are hurting confused and frustrated all because of their perception of being alone and without love in their life. As a result of this, they have tried everything under the sun to find love, matchmaking companies, dating services, hundreds and hundreds of blind dates only to still find themselves alone and without love. It is said that if your premise is wrong, your conclusion will be wrong and that where you end up will depend on where you begin. This is especially true as it relates to finding love in our lives. So many people have made painstaking mistakes in love because they had the wrong premise about what love... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vacuum Assisted wound closure

3247 words - 13 pages Vacuum assisted wound closure is simply the application of controlled negative pressure to a wound in an effort to enhance the body?s own defense mechanisms to expedite the wound healing process. Although relatively new in the health care market place, it is quickly making a name for itself as a successful adjunct therapy in the treatment of wounds. The V.A.C. TM technique evolved from a desire to develop a treatment for chronic debilitating wounds. As the successful treatment of chronic, unsalvageable wounds mounted, this treatment expanded to use with sub-acute and acute wounds. Chronic wounds such as stage III and IV pressure ulcers, along with venous, arterial and neuropathic ulcers,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Diseases as a Reflection of the Psyche

649 words - 3 pages DISEASES AS A REFLECTION OF THE PSYCHEWanting to know whether or not the human brain hasthe power to cure the body of illness, I set out tofind an article with some cold hard facts. Thisarticle, written by Marcia Angell, Ph.D., elaborates onthe subject of the connection between mental state anddisease.The belief that there is a connection betweenmental and physical health is apparent in the article.It signifies that if a person is in a positive frame ofmind, active and content, then they are physicallyhealthy and have the ability to... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Healing Power of Poetry

1656 words - 7 pages "The Healing Power of Poetry" The devastations and repercussions of war are inimitable, and can sometimes be left unhealed. However, men and women have had to find cures to lick their wounds and resettle the turbulence existing within their minds. In Pat Barker's emotionally powerful war novel Regeneration, we are introduced to a war journal, called the Hydra, on page 84, which served as healing tool for WWI soldiers. This journal contained articles, cartoons, poetry, letters, and all kinds of other different types of writing. Barker uses the Hydra in her novel to mark the healing power of writing in the lives of these men. Poetry therapy has a long history, being recognized as far... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Shouldice Hospital Limited: Case Study.

2282 words - 9 pages A Brief History:Dr. Edward Earle Shouldice graduated from the University of Toronto in 1916. By 1940, Dr. Shouldice was operating a private medical and surgical practice, lecturing at the University of Toronto, and pursuing research work in areas of advancing medical knowledge. During World War II, he was called to serve on the Medical Examining Board. Dr. Shouldice, a major in the army, found that many young men willing to serve their country had to be denied enlistment. These men needed surgical treatment to repair their hernias before... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Impact of Determinants of Health

1546 words - 6 pages For the purpose of this paper, a 43 year-old female of Aboriginal decent, who is originally from Saskatoon, was interviewed. For confidentiality reasons, the patient will be referred to as A.B. This paper will discuss the admitting diagnosis of A.B., the determinants of health with a focus on income and social status, as well as a reflection on nursing practice. A.B. sought health care after two weeks of experiencing of fever, chills, coughing, and black tarry stool. The admitting diagnosis was pneumonia and upper gastrointestinal bleed (UGIB). She also has pertinent history of liver cirrhosis and previous UGIBs. The patient’s pneumonia has greatly improved but she remains at risk for... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Patient Falls and Medication Errors

1177 words - 5 pages Issue/Problem of Interest Falls are the second most common adverse event within health care institutions following medication errors, and an estimated 30% of hospital-based falls result in serious injury. The severity of this problem led the Joint Commission to make reducing the risk of patient injuries from falls a national patient safety goal for hospitals in 2009 (AHRQ, 2006). Falls are a leading cause of hospital-acquired injury and frequently prolong and complicate hospital stays and result in poor quality of life, increased costs, and unanticipated admissions to long-term care facilities. Changes in health care financing in the 1990s were accompanied by a variety of cost-cutting... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Methods to Improve Sleep and Rest in the Hospital

1092 words - 4 pages The founders of nursing acknowledged the need for sleep and rest to aid the body in healing, but with 60% of patients requesting a sedative, this shows the hospital environment is not one that promotes sleep and rest. There is renewed interest in exploring the best nonpharmacological methods of helping achieve sleep and rest while in the hospital to promote healing (Robinson, Weitzel, & Henderson, 2005). Evidence-Based Practice As nurses frequently interact with the patients, they are the ones exploring evidence-based practice to identify ways to modify the hospital environment and use more nonpharmacological methods to promote sleep to help the body repair itself (Robinson et al., 2005).... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Plastic Surgeon Fiona Wood, Inventor of Cellspray

932 words - 4 pages Plastic surgeon Dr Fiona Wood and medical scientist Ms Marie Stoner have created a revolutionary treatment for burns victims called CellSpray®. It involves culturing the cells from a small piece of the patient's skin, and then spraying the resulting suspension onto the wound. The live skin cells quickly multiply to cover the damaged area, and the potential for scarring and infection are greatly reduced. In addition, because the covering is generated from the patient's own cells, there is almost no chance of rejection.In 2002, CellSpray® was put to an extreme test, when Fiona led the team at VIEW DOCUMENT
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Dr. Hildegard E. Peplau and Her Theory

2195 words - 9 pages Theorist Nursing Background: Dr. Hildegard E. Peplau, one of the world's leading nurses and theorists who is known to the world as the mother of psychiatric nursing, was born into an immigrant family in Reading Pennsylvania, USA in 1909 ( Sills, 2007). The devastating flu epidemic of 1918 influenced Dr. Peplau’s understanding and the impact of illness and death on families ( Sills, 2007). As a result, Dr. Peplau decided to attend nursing school. In 1931 she received her diploma from Pottstown Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Sills, 2007).Soon after graduation she began her career as a staff nurse in Pennsylvania and New York City (Sills, 2007). After becoming the school nurse at Bennington... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Psychedelic Drugs.

2353 words - 9 pages Why do people use drugs? Virtually everyone in every society participates in the drug culture. There is a universal human need to alter ones' consciousness, thus resulting in an overwhelming amount of drug use cross-culturally. The relationship between humans and psychoactive substances is an ongoing one, and dates back to the origination of human life. A drug can be defined as any and all substances that alter the normal human state. These are nonfood substances with some sort of pharmacological effect. The uses of these drugs are numerous, but stem from one of three main purposes: health seeking, spiritual, or recreational uses. Human participation in drug use creates individualized... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Western Views of Non-Traditional Medicines

2567 words - 10 pages If you walk into any pharmacy, grocery store, or natural foods store, you cannot avoid the shelves and displays of "alternative" remedies and treatments. Promises of fewer aches and pains, clearer skin, slower aging, better digestion, and more "harmonious" body functions are plastered on store walls and across bottle labels with many, often green, pills and liquids. Ginseng, Echinacea, acupuncture, reflexology, antioxidants, Vitamin A, B, C, E... have all become a familiar part of our culture's vocabulary, and for many, a part of their health regime. The allure of treatments that are as simple as a collection of plants or are based on a well-loved substance like garlic are obvious,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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A Whistleblower’s Dilemma

931 words - 4 pages The ethical theory I find very interesting and will have a huge impact on my daily practice is Martin Buber’s theory. I chose to talk about this theory because after few years of practicing medicine I started feeling that I have been dealing with patients as objects with the goal of healing them. Physicians and patients may be constrained from achieving good relationships by the very nature of their interactions, which are planned and purposive. Buber examined how people relate to each other and behave in moral or immoral ways. He divided these relationships into four levels as identified in the Morrison’s text. The two levels I find very relevant to our daily life, whether personal or... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Placebo Response and the Power of Unconscious Healing

1691 words - 7 pages The art and science of medicine is a continuously growing field of knowledge. In spite of the vast developments that have transpired through the ages in the history of healing, scientists have barely uncovered everything there is to know about how the healthy body functions and how it reacts to disease. We cannot assume that what we know now is sufficient to solve our common problems in health or that in some cases, there is no remedy for yet, unsolved puzzles of incurable disease. The natural process of healing is something that occurs in all creatures, and it involves various mechanisms that repair, restore, and preserve the organism as well as ensure that the species survives and in many... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Faith and Spirituality

1575 words - 6 pages RLST 1107 EL10EssayDone By: Sydney Paluzzi - 233310Due Date: March 18th, 2011Quantities of people around the world do not follow organized religions however pursue spirituality. "Spirituality refers to the unique and intense experience of a reality greater than oneself or an experience of connection with the totality of things". (Bailey, 23) An individual does not have to be religious in order to have a spiritual experience. The benefits of spirituality include humbleness, inner strength and peace, hope, sense of meaning and purpose in life, healing, acceptance of self and others, sense of... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Waves: How they have revolutionized the healthcare industry.

741 words - 3 pages A scientific breakthrough that was discovered in early 2001 uses waves in the treatment of chronic foot or heal pain (1USA Today). It is indeed the same system used for the past few years in dealing with kidney stones (2Lex18), but it has just recently started being used for heel and other foot pain. It is a relatively rare procedure as of now, but is growing steadily more and more popular among podiatric patients. Ultimately, it's a solution that will provide a safe and non-invasive alternate to traditional foot surgery, which is the main reason for it's growing popularity.The creators of the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Burns: The Human Skin

2377 words - 10 pages “Living with Burn Trauma,” an online article, states that “human skin is the largest organ of the body.” It provides many functions which assist humans to survive. What happens if this vital organ is destroyed? This is a question with which thousands of Americans are challenged annually. In the United States alone, 4,000 people die in burn accidents or from complications of burn injuries (“Prevention”). One common misconception is that burn victims have all come into contact with flames. Burns result from fires, electricity, hot liquids, chemicals, and even ultraviolet rays. Seeking medical attention for a proper diagnosis is critical to ensuring quality treatment and management of burns.... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Identify & explore metapardigm concepts of nursing

2632 words - 11 pages Introduction.The purpose of this assignment is to identify and explore one of Jacqueline Fawcett's (1984) metapardigm concepts of nursing that she identifies as being concepts central to nursing and explore how this is expressed in Judith Christensen's (1990) Nursing Partnership Model. The following discussion seeks to analyse the metaparadigm concept of 'person' according to Christensen (1990).To facilitate this, it is important to discover what is meant by metaparadigm and to further explore what a conceptual model is. This will lead to a better understanding of what Fawcett means by the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Healing Power of the Body

1355 words - 5 pages Although we might not all agree on whoever or whatever created the human body, I think we can all agree it is an amazing, self-functioning machine. The ability of the body to maintain a healthy status quo and to heal itself without input is unlike any man made machine in existence. However, with today’s society wanting more and at an ever accelerating rate, the incredible inventions of doctors, engineers and scientists have that work in conjunction with the body to heal is truly amazing. Despite the body’s talent to heal subconsciously, it turns out there is many ways we can affect the process with our current health, both positive and negatively. The human body has programmed... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Prophet Habakkuk: His Prophecy and an Explanation

598 words - 2 pages Habakkuk:The Prophet who questioned GodThere were many prophets in the Bible, but none were quite as daring as Habakkuk. Habakkuk spoke out to God, and asked why He was allowing the world to be full of hate, violence, and death. Habakkuk isn’t the most famous prophet, but he spoke with God, and preached God’s warnings. Habakkuk lived in Jerusalem in the Southern Kingdom of Judah (Bandstra), which is current day Israel. He lived during the Babylonian Crisis, which was when the Babylonians were conquering much of the land between what is now the Mediterranean Sea and the Persian Gulf, around 608-598 B.C.(Bandstra). The meaning of Habakkuk’s name is not agreed on, and often debated.... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Hospital Risk Management

1038 words - 4 pages The Joint Commission's Sentinel Event Policy, implemented in 1996, is designed to help health care organizations to identify sentinel events and take action to prevent their recurrence. A sentinel event is an unexpected occurrence involving death or serious physical--including loss of limb or function--or psychological injury, or the risk thereof. "Risk thereof" means that, although no harm occurred this time, any recurrence would carry a significant chance of a serious adverse outcome. Any time a sentinel event occurs, the health care organization is expected to complete a thorough and credible root cause... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Albert Schweitzer

1325 words - 5 pages Albert Schweitzer once said, "I don't know what your destiny will be, but one thing I do know. The only ones among you who will be truly happy are those who have sought and found how to serve."12 Schweitzer was a true citizen of the world. Already known as a brilliant expert in music and theology, he decided to study to become a medical doctor to help people who were suffering. He believed in showing love and compassion toward all living things, which he called ‘reverence for life.'1 When Schweitzer went to school as a boy, he noticed that his family was better off than many of the other families in his village. Over the objections of his parents, the young Schweitzer decided, after his... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Healing Powers of Animal Therapy

2426 words - 10 pages Animals have been human companions for many centuries providing a source of peace and calm to those around them; however the use of animals in a structured therapy environment is a fairly recent phenomenon. Animal therapy involves bringing animals into the healing process, which can has been proven effective in aiding many types of people. Whether it be a dog, cat, bird, rabbit, or even a horse, all types of animals can be trained to help the emotional and physical health of people in simple and extraordinary ways. The use of animal therapy with highly trained animals can benefit the emotional and physical health of a variety of people, including children, the elderly, and individuals with... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Princess Diana

1214 words - 5 pages One year ago, the death of a princess brought an entire world to tears. The wounds are slowly healing and the grief is less painful. What remains are the lessons that can be learned from a phenomenon that few can entirely forget. At the time it was a mystery. A divorced member of the royal family of a medium-sized European nation dies in a banal car accident in Paris, and for a week the sun, moon and stars are knocked off their appointed tracks. Within days, Europe suffers a shortage of cut flowers as tens of thousands of bouquets are laid before the house of the victim. Demand for newsprint soars; the funeral, watched live on television throughout the world, attracts an audience of 1... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Examining Swanson's Theory of Caring

1149 words - 5 pages Examining the Theory of Caring Swanson's (1993) Theory of Caring is structured around five principles that encompass the overall definition of caring in nursing practice. This theory states that caring revolves around five categories: knowing, being with, doing for, enabling, and maintaining belief. When applied to nursing practice, each of these five categories can fuel the caregiver's attitude and improve overall patient well-being. In nursing, as well as other areas caring can be defined as, "a nurturing way of relating to a valued other toward whom one feels a personal sense of commitment and responsibility'. Upon examination, the five processes of Swanson's Theory of Caring can be used... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Differences in Health Care Illustrated in Anne Fadiman's The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down

1737 words - 7 pages What would it be like to come to a country and not understand anything about its health care system? To many this would be a very daunting task. Unfortunately, this is the scenario that the Lee family has to deal with in the book The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down by Anne Fadiman. The Lee family, and the other thousands of Hmong immigrants, try to understand and navigate the complex and sometimes confusing health care system of the United States. As the book points out, the values and ideals of the Hmong culture and the United States health care system are not always the same and sometimes come into great conflict with each other. Lia Lee was unfortunately the person stuck in the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Health is Beauty

1759 words - 7 pages The Fundamental Principles of Aromatherapy: Health Is Beauty The diverse use in essential oils can be traced back to ancient Egypt, Babylon, Europe ,India, and even Asia. In the past, essential oils have been linked to the early inventions of Egyptian cosmetics, perfumes, and initially begin with the Egyptian priest using scented essences as a sign of holiness that could balance mental affiliation that hindered the soul of evil deeds. While the practice of essential oils varies throughout cultures, one fact remains; scented oils have miraculously proven to have healing effects upon the body, mind, and soul. This essay compares and reflects on the different uses of... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Communication in Radiology

1501 words - 6 pages In a recent patient review study, one patient answered, “Are the doctors communicating amongst themselves here? It would be so much better for the patient if they were collaborating as a team.” This statement goes for every health care professional in this hospital. Employee actions are not going unnoticed by patients. It’s essential for doctors to have a general understanding of radiology procedures in order to treat patients appropriately. Mandatory training for physician assistants on understanding radiology exams will enhance communication between P.A’s and technologists, clarify communication between P.A’s and patients, and eliminate unnecessary radiation exposure by ordering radiology... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Grey’s Anatomy Increases Patient Satisfaction

1794 words - 7 pages Meredith Grey, a main character in the television show, Grey’s Anatomy once said, "Surgeons are control freaks. With a scalpel in your hand, you feel unstoppable. There's no fear, there's no pain. You're 10 feet tall and bulletproof.” Dr. Grey said this in the third episode, first season of the hit medical drama Grey’s Anatomy. The ABC series, created by Shonda Rhimes, first aired in 2005, and is in its tenth season, with new episodes on Thursday nights at 9/8 central. The series averaged 16.4 million viewers throughout its first 10 seasons, peaking at 25.41million viewers in the third season. (U.S.) The series concerns several surgical interns and their journey to becoming full-blown... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Native American Remedies

2229 words - 9 pages Native American Remedies "Mike Spring, paralyzed from the waist... down and in constant pain, sailed to the Azores and back. On his return, he confounded his TV interviewer with the statement that the only way he was able to obtain relief from the pain that continually racked his body was to press his back to an oak tree. This simple and cost-free action would then afford him several hours of complete relief and helped him to carry on in life. When asked for a scientific explanation, Mr. Spring replied that he had none-- it simply worked! He had heard of the treatment from an American Indian source and had been using it successfully for years" (Psychology of Healing- Murry Hope 89). ... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Use of Plot and Sensory Description in Julio Cortazar's Face Up

1244 words - 5 pages How do you know that a dream is really a dream or if reality is real? The ‘Night Face Up’ is a short story written by Julio Cortazar depicting a nameless protagonist who flips between dream and reality. The main character is switching between a hospital setting between the 1950’s and 1980’s, and an ancient Aztec area. The man experiences a world where he was recently involved in a motorcycle accident and ends up in the hospital with a broken arm. In the Aztec area he is running for his life as he is being hunted down to be a human sacrifice. This story leaves a lasting impression on the reader and achieves unity of effect through the authors use of plot and sensory description. The use of... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Research In Clinical Practise

11450 words - 46 pages Research In Clinical Practise Introduction to Portfolio The research articles to be critiqued relate to the author’s area of practice; community nursing and in particular; the cost-effectiveness of community leg ulcer clinics. The author currently manages a leg ulcer clinic and an insight into the research underpinning their cost-effectiveness would be of benefit in her quest to deliver evidence-based practice in line with the principles underpinning clinical governance. Management of venous leg ulcers had advanced considerably over the last decade. This is due to various factors from greater knowledge of the aetiology of leg ulceration to... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Sherman Alexie A Native American Writer

1496 words - 6 pages Sherman Alexie has made a name for himself as a prolific contemporary Native American writer, taking inspiration from his own past and experiences with modern Indian life. While there are many enduring themes throughout Alexie's writings: Native identity, modern reservation life, alcohol abuse etc. when it comes to his collection War Dances, the most apparent motif is fatherhood. Community and family are the heart of Native American cultures, with the father archetype holding great honor and expectation. However with alcohol abuse, poverty, and school drop rates running rampant through Native American reservations it is no surprise that more and more Native children are growing up in broken... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Happiness in Cinderella and The Bachelor

1812 words - 7 pages Completing the Equation For decades, society has introduced fairytales to children at a young age. As the children grow older, they are exposed to more stories, such as television shows. As each child grows mentally and emotionally, they are exposed to the idea that happiness can only be found in love. This love is usually found between two beautiful people, such as in ABC’s The Bachelor and Charles Perrault’s timeless fairytale “Cinderella”. Each of these exerts shed light on society’s view of happiness and the idea that we, as members of society, are expected to agree and achieve this type throughout our lifetime. What we are not told as children, however, is that there is more to life... VIEW DOCUMENT