Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm Essay Examples

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Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm Essay

Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm Essay

1172 words - 5 pages Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm The concentration of a healing hospital is to make an environment which aids to decrease the tension level of patients and their kin. When the patients are transferred to the hospitals they went through a lot of tension and anxiety like, frightening of the unknown, hurting therapeutic processes, modification in financial status because of the increasing expenses due to hospitalizing and are considerable as most hard times of their life. By careful self evaluation of the fact that spirituality is one of the greatest key factor in the healing recovery stage, the healing hospitals goal is to enhance overall wellness of the patients and their relatives like VIEW DOCUMENT
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Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm Essay

Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm Essay

1322 words - 5 pages pain medication. A healing atmosphere also brings other forms of treatment in addition to Western Medicine. Some hospitals are now offering complementary and alternative medical practices that blend with traditional evidence-based medicine to promote the patient’s overall wellbeing. According to a recent article, “blended medicine has been found to promote stress reduction, promote faster healing, decrease infection rates, promote staff and patient satisfaction, and encourage the economic benefit of lower hospital operating costs” (Geimer-Flanders 2009). A few hospitals in Florida that have been built with a healing paradigm include; Florida Hospital Wesley Chapel, Jupiter Medical Center, as VIEW DOCUMENT
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Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm Essay

The Healing Hospital Paradigm Essay

1151 words - 5 pages The inception of the “Healing Hospital” is not new. Healing hospitals in various forms have been around throughout history. As hospitals were slowly taken over by religious orders they became more holistic concentrating on all aspects of healing including physical, mental, and spiritual. Instead of focusing on the patient as a carrier of disease and death they began to look at them as a person that has certain fundamental needs for existence. One of these needs as fore mentioned is spirituality. Spirituality simply defined “is that which relates to or affects the human spirit or soul as opposed to material or physical things. Spirituality touches that part of you that is not dependent on VIEW DOCUMENT
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Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm Essay

Concept Essay

1146 words - 5 pages core concept for establishing The Theory of Human Caring was due to a disconnect she felt between nursing’s paradigm of caring-healing and medicine’s paradigm of diagnosis-treatment (Cara, 2003). As a result, she developed carative factors to describe her humanitarian, aesthetic, and spiritual value system. Established initially in 1979, and later revised in 1988, Watson’s carative factors contrast the curative factors of medicine. Watson did so with the concept of honoring the human dimension that is nursing (Cara, 2003). These factors serve to define nursing knowledge, practice, and phenomena and to compliment the healing knowledge and practices established in medicine (Cara, 2003). As listed VIEW DOCUMENT
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Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm Essay

Patient Pharmacological Analysis

939 words - 4 pages community teaching hospital and focused on 98 patients. Half the patients were offered piperacillin/tazobactam continuously while the other half had intermittent infusions. The specific doses were dependent on the patient’s infection and their renal functioning. The study found that continuous infusion was the superior form of administration based on the speed at reducing fever and bacteria and even more significantly in reducing medication costs. Gender and Wound Healing A study by Rono et el. (2013) looked at gender effects on wound healing in plasmin deficient mice. The study looked at multiple aspects of wound healing and found no difference in immune cell migration however there was a VIEW DOCUMENT
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Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm Essay

Nursing Theory Essay

1053 words - 4 pages and patient along with spiritual matters to provide appropriate care. (Black) The last major concept in her theory is that health is a harmony of body mind and soul; illness is the lack of this harmony. In order for the patient’s health to be restored this harmony must be reestablished. Watson’s core concept for establishing the theory of caring was due to a disconnect she felt between nursing’s paradigm of caring-healing and medicine’s paradigm of diagnosis and treatment. (Cara) As a result, she developed carative factors that would be the basis for a value system that was humanitarian, aesthetic and spiritual. Established initially in 1979, and later revised in 1988 Watson’s carative factors VIEW DOCUMENT
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Essay on Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm

The Advantages Of Energy Medicine Essay

1371 words - 5 pages therapies, manipulative and body-based methods and energy medicine. Nowadays, energy medicine starts to improve its role in complementary and alternative medicine. Energy medicine can be used for healing and can also improve a person’s wellness and make a person’s performance better. Besides, energy medicine is speedy, holistic, practical and efficient. Therefore, energy medicine can replace or be used to support conventional medicine in some ways. Doctors and nurses should learn to use energy medicine especially for critical care. In “Six Pillars of Energy Medicine: Clinical Strengths of a Complementary Paradigm” David Feinstein and Donna Eden (2008) argue that clinical experience VIEW DOCUMENT
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Essay on Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm

Catholic Faith-Based Healing Essay

2988 words - 12 pages Jim would visit the individual in the hospital, pray for him/her, and perform the necessary sacraments, but he would also encourage this individual to accept necessary professional medical care. In this way, a priest can use his role as a faith-based healer to make healing, in all of its forms, a community experience. Sahota’s research supports this healing strategy. Sahota discussed in her presentation that the most effective suicide prevention programs incorporate community action. To make an effective action plan for suicide prevention, it i necessary to conduct collaboration between tribal programs in the community, establish a universal mental health code with a central reporting VIEW DOCUMENT
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Essay on Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm

Religion, Spirituality, And Complementary Alternative Medicine

549 words - 2 pages Religion, Spirituality, and CAM (Complementary Alternative Medicine), can be related in many ways. Those who stand by their beliefs believe that God will heal all. Religion and spirituality is a major essential part of one’s’ health. They have included things such as prayer in healing, counseling, and the use of meditation. Spiritual issues make a difference in an individual’s experience of illness and health. With spirituality, the health care providers can learn to support the values for the art of healing. The health care provider must have respect for their patient’s religion. (Larry Dossey. Healing Words: The Power of Prayer and the Practice of Medicine. Harper Collins, San VIEW DOCUMENT
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Essay on Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm

Nursing Philosophy And Nursing Theory Essay

1842 words - 7 pages framework of inherent qualities, social, spiritual, cultural and environmental influences that are the foundation of the individual human being (Chitty, 2007, p. 294). Environmental conditions that surround individuals influence a person’s state of well being. They include the social and cultural aspects that are present in the lives of individuals (Chitty, 2007, p. 296). An environment that lacks basic needs of food, shelter, clean air and water effect’s the healing process and must be taken into consideration when assessing a patient. A basic support system of family friends and clergy are also key components. Health is not limited to a physical illness that can be cured or alleviated but VIEW DOCUMENT
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Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm Research Paper

Laughter Is A Medicine Remedy

1134 words - 5 pages , Anatomy of an illness as perceived by the patient : reflections on healing and regeneration, introd. by <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ren%C3%A9_Dubos">René Dubosa>, New York : Norton, 1979Transformational change for individuals and the worldby Pamela Gerloff, Ed.D. <a href="http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-possibility-paradigm/201106/are-you-meeting-your-laugh-quota-why-you-should-laugh-5-year-ol">http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-possibility-paradigm/201106/are-you-meeting-your-laugh-quota-why-you-should-laugh-5-year-ola> VIEW DOCUMENT
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Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm Research Paper

Cultural Diversity in the Health Care Setting

1953 words - 8 pages Cultural Diversity in the Health Care Setting Cultural diversity in the health care setting is increasing each year. Knowing how to care for patients of different religious and spiritual faiths is essential to providing high-quality, patient-centered care. The author of this paper will research three lesser-known religions; Taoism, Sikhism and Shamanism. Through this paper, she will provide a brief background on each of the three religions and present information regarding spiritual perspectives on healing, critical components of healing and health care considerations associated with each religion. Taoism Taoism is an ancient Chinese religion dating back to the sixth century. The basic VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Inspiring Art Of Healing

650 words - 3 pages exemplary patient care. The hospital became my second home and I realized that I might enjoy working in a health care setting. While volunteering at UCSF, I also discovered the important role that language plays in connecting with patients, and the socio-emotional aspects of healing that may be overlooked in a field that tends to prioritize biological mechanisms. Growing up as a second generation Indian, I was fortunate to have learned and preserved my mother tongues through speaking Hindi and Punjabi with my parents on a daily basis. At UCSF, I reached out to Indian patients who were experiencing language barriers, and was surprised to discover the simple calming effects of a warm smile and VIEW DOCUMENT
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Saving Private Ryan Movie Analysis

554 words - 2 pages real world in modern society. Attached is an article from the Sunday edition of the Toronto Star. Lynda Hurst writes about how Jessica Lynch's role in the <a href="http://www.wikinvest.com/concept/Iraq_War" title="Iraq War">Iraq wara> was enhanced by the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States" title="United States">American Governmenta> to draw support for the war. Lynch did not have any combat action, she was in an accident. Lynch never fired a bullet and was knocked out and taken into the care of very kind Iraqi hospital workers. The American Government pumped up the story to make Lynch sound like a brave and courageous fighter who had to be saved by a daring raid. The daring raid consisted of hospital workers giving the American military a key so they could rescue Lynch. VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Biology Of Prayer And Healing

1033 words - 4 pages (Koenig, Smiley, and Gonzales 91). • Most recently, Harris et. al. (1999) found an 11% reduction in the score that measures severity of condition for those in the coronary care unit of a hospital. While these studies do not prove the existence of God, they have observed that “when individuals outside of the hospital speak (or think) the first names of hospitalized patients with an attitude of prayer,” the patients’ conditions improve (Harris). • Most convincing of an unexplainable, possibly divine, cure are the studies done using “distance healing.” Sicher et al (1998) found that when individuals with acquired immune deficiency syndrome received prayer treatment from others across VIEW DOCUMENT
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Healing By Prayer: What Is It and What Are Its Ramifications?

1107 words - 4 pages attention in those instances as well. After extensive investigation, and an autopsy, it was determined that the boy was a hemophiliac, and that was the reason behind his bleeding out (Peters 5). This boy could have been saved relatively easily had his parents taken him to the hospital, to seek medical attention when it was necessary. But they didn't, not because of pure negligence, but because they believed so strongly, and took so literally the verses about healing written in the Bible, such as those in the Epistle of James, “13Is anyone among you afflicted (ill-treated, suffering evil)? He should pray. Is anyone glad at heart? He should sing praise. 14 Is anyone among you sick? He should call VIEW DOCUMENT
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Shamanistic Healing

2124 words - 8 pages Shamanistic Healing Shamanistic healing, one of the oldest spiritual healing powers, has recently become a topic of interest in modern medicine. What is Shamanism? Shamanism is a mix of magic, folklore, medicine and spirituality that evolved in tribal and gathering communities thousands of years ago. Shamanic faith presumes that everyone and everything has a spirit which is a part of a greater whole, and that spirits affect all events, including illness and disease. In the tradition of Shamanism it is believed that certain people named shamans exhibit particular magical specialties at birth; the most common specialization is that of a healer. A Shaman is believed to VIEW DOCUMENT
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Raised Global Competition Forces: Transformation for Organizations

786 words - 3 pages performance by establishing a competitive advantage over its rivals. The success of a competitive strategy depends on organization responses that lead to unique, valuable, and difficult-to-imitate benefits. Transformational change assists organizations in developing these benefits and managing strategic change. Change is systemic and Revolutionary Transformational change involves reshaping the organization’s design components and culture. These changes will be characterized as systemic and revolutionary as a result of the whole nature of the organization is altered essentially Change Demands a new Organizing Paradigm Organizations undertaking transformational change square measure, by VIEW DOCUMENT
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Environmental Impact On Healing

1344 words - 5 pages Usefulness of the Theory Human beings and the environment are always interacting and impacting each other. Therefore, it is imperative that as an Advance Practice Nurse (APN) one considers the physical, social, cultural and any other factors that may impact the environment as it relates to the patient. The primary goal of the Environmental Impact on Healing Theory is to promote awareness of the environment and its effect on the patient’s healing through the use of energy and altering the surrounding environment. By altering the environment positively and balancing the flow of energy, healing progression may be seen. Rogers defined a human being as unitary person irreducible and is VIEW DOCUMENT
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Spiritual Variety Of Healthcare Services: Different Perspectives From A Sikh, Tao And Catholic Health Care Provider

1878 words - 8 pages is the guiding truth that she uses each day in the hospital setting that allows her to freely accept people of all faiths and support their personal journey toward healing. When asked about her spiritual perspective on healing she was very comfortable with her answer. She said “absolutely, God does heal.” She feels from a Sikh perspective that there is a balance in the soul and that the person who is ill must be willing to let go to receive. It is a type of faith, that the person seeking healing, beyond their ability to understand. As a caregiver she states “being a Sikh makes me one with most religions, because I believe we all are of the same God and it is His healing that they seek VIEW DOCUMENT
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Incorporating The Metaparadigm Of Nursing With The Theory Of Caring

1573 words - 6 pages I. Introduction The purpose of this paper is to present a personal belief about the metaparadigm of nursing and to incorporate it into that of Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring. II. Personal Belief on the Paradigm Every person’s needs must be recognized, respected, and filled if he or she must attain wholeness. The environment must attuned to that wholeness for healing to occur. Healing must be total or holistic if health must be restored or maintained. And a nurse-patient relationship is the very foundation of nursing (Conway et al 2011; Johnson, 2011). The Theory recognizes a person’s needs above all. It sets up the conducive environment to healing. It addresses and VIEW DOCUMENT
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Experiencing Real Love

2952 words - 12 pages experienced in relationships. It’s their fault! They do not talk right! They do not act right! I am giving my all; they are not giving me anything! But chances are that if you have had five relationships in the past three years that there may not be something wrong with the other individual but you have to begin to look at you. You have to be honest and look at yourself and say could the problem be me? Could I be the reason that my last five relationships failed? It is not until you are able to be honest can the healing and deliverance process begin. It is my desire here in this writing that we address these and many other issues so that you can lay a proper foundation and begin to VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Power Of Therapeutic Touch

525 words - 2 pages The Power of Therapeutic Touch   Derived from several ancient healing practices, therapeutic touch is based on the theory of human energy fields - every person has an energy field that surrounds the entire body. During therapeutic touch treatment, practitioners use their hands, without actually touching the person, to re-establish a healthy energy flow. Therapeutic touch seeks to restore balance within the body while also stimulating the patient's own healing response. The practice of therapeutic touch is used worldwide in thousands of hospitals, clinics, and private practices. It is an easily learned, successful complement to other healing programs.   Therapeutic touch VIEW DOCUMENT
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Exactly How "Triage" By Scott Anderson Challenges Us To Examine Our Beliefs And Assumptions About Life.

980 words - 4 pages We all believe healing is easy. Healing is just a matter of time, and maybe a few pills. Healing is an effortless activity. "<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Triage-Scott-Anderson/dp/0330368540%3FSubscriptionId%3D0G81C5DAZ03ZR9WH9X82%26tag%3Dzemanta-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0330368540" title="Triage">Triagea>", written by Scott Anderson, proves this common misconception wrong. The reader is displayed with examples of our natural tendencies to move away from sources of pain and complications. We are shown how we also tend to grow closer to people we believe can cure us. Anderson illustrates how willpower is an essential factor in healing, and VIEW DOCUMENT
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Diseases As A Representation Of The Psyche

649 words - 3 pages >minor pain.If you are curious about this topic some othersources of information are "Mind and body Medicine: Anew Paradigm?" by Frank Sabatino, Ph.D.. in the journalHospitals. It also discusses how this once "shunned"practice is becoming more and more popular in todayshealth care society. Another article one may considerreading is "New concepts of Health and Healing Mayaffect Hospitals Approach to Care", also by FrankSabatino. It discusses how some of the ancientpractices are coming back into circulation in themedical field. Techniques such as acupuncture,acupressure, yoga, and meditation are complimentary VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vacuum Assisted Wound Closure

3247 words - 13 pages Vacuum assisted wound closure is simply the application of controlled negative pressure to a wound in an effort to enhance the body?s own defense mechanisms to expedite the wound healing process. Although relatively new in the health care market place, it is quickly making a name for itself as a successful adjunct therapy in the treatment of wounds. The V.A.C. TM technique evolved from a desire to develop a treatment for chronic debilitating wounds. As the successful treatment of chronic, unsalvageable wounds mounted, this treatment expanded to use with sub-acute and acute wounds. Chronic wounds such as stage III and IV pressure ulcers, along with venous, arterial and neuropathic ulcers VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Impact Of Determinants Of Health

1546 words - 6 pages ://www.cna-aiic.ca/~/media/cna/page%20content/pdf%20en/2013/07/26/10/51/bg7_primary_health_care_e.pdf Canadian Nurses Association (CNA). (2005b). Social determinants of health and nursing: A summary of the issues. Retrieved from http://www.cna-aiic.ca/~/media/cna/page%20content/pdf%20en/2013/07/26/10/38/bg8_social_determinants_e.pdf Charyton, C., Elliott, J.O., Lu, B., Moore, J.L. (2009). The impact of social support on health related quality of life in persons with epilepsy. Epilepsy and Behavior, 16, 640-645. DeGagné, M. (2007). Toward an Aboriginal paradigm of healing: addressing the legacy of residential schools. Australasian Psychiatry, 15S49-S53. doi:10.1080/10398560701701114 Dunn, J.R VIEW DOCUMENT
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Psych Term Paper

2992 words - 12 pages While roaming the hills around an isolated home, a young boy named Henry, displayed rather unusual characteristics associated with his behaviors. What seemed like a cute and innocent boy was nothing but a face of hidden evil. Henry was a very free-spirited and often wild 12 year old boy who enjoyed engaging in daring activities while experiencing adrenaline rushes. His behaviors and curiosities seemed to be limitless, to the point where it brought forth a bit of suspicion. At this age, these types of behaviors may seem “normal” for a young boy like Henry; behaviors that display some hyperactivity, and self-exploration. However, Henry’s attitude and behaviors took a quick turn as his real VIEW DOCUMENT
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Aboriginal Medication

1952 words - 8 pages cultural beliefs had no difficulty in understanding the healing practices of the people. This appreciation of equality and respect was an advantage to the Aboriginal people, especially within their healing methods.      Illness was treated in many ways but the main goal was to achieve a sense of balance and harmony.(p82). Applications of herbs and roots, spiritual intervention, and community wide ritual and ceremonies were all therapeutic practices.(p71). “It was the healer who held the keys to the supernatural and natural worlds and who interpreted signs, diagnosed disease and provided medicines from the grassland, woodland, and parkland pharmacopoeia.”(p18). The VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Healing Power Of Poetry

1656 words - 7 pages ). Once recognized for its healing power, this therapy quickly moved to the North American continent. Within the American colonies, the first American hospital to care for the mentally ill was founded in 1751 by Benjamin Franklin, called the Pennsylvania Hospital. This hospital is known to have included reading, writing, and then also the actual publishing of their writings in a newspaper they named "The Illuminator." In recent times, in the 1960s and 1970s, the term "bibliotherapy" was created to literally embrace the meaning that literature is here to serve and help. During this time, researchers continually investigated it in the attempt to get something definitively published. In 1969 VIEW DOCUMENT
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Dr. Hildegard E. Peplau And Her Theory

2195 words - 9 pages College in Vermont, Peplau earned her Bachelor’s degree in interpersonal psychology, in 1943 ( Sills, 2007). She then started working in a private psychiatric facility. During the world war second (1943-1945) Dr. peplau served in the Army Nurse Corps and was assigned to the Field Station Hospital in England, where the American School of Military Psychiatry was located ( Sills, 2007). It was during the war that Dr. Peplau enhanced her nursing knowledge and practice through direct participation in both learning and practicing. In 1947 Dr. Peplau received her masters and doctoral degrees from Teachers College, Columbia University ( Sills, 2007). In 1954 she was certified in psychoanalysis by the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Patient Falls And Medication Errors

1177 words - 5 pages Issue/Problem of Interest Falls are the second most common adverse event within health care institutions following medication errors, and an estimated 30% of hospital-based falls result in serious injury. The severity of this problem led the Joint Commission to make reducing the risk of patient injuries from falls a national patient safety goal for hospitals in 2009 (AHRQ, 2006). Falls are a leading cause of hospital-acquired injury and frequently prolong and complicate hospital stays and result in poor quality of life, increased costs, and unanticipated admissions to long-term care facilities. Changes in health care financing in the 1990s were accompanied by a variety of cost-cutting VIEW DOCUMENT
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Technology Styles

601 words - 2 pages the Healing Pulse healing app (http://healingpulseapp.com/). Those who are having spiritual, mental and physical issues can balance them out through the use of healing frequencies, which can be accessed through their smartphones. And that, among others, are just a few of the reasons why a lot of people are loving their gadgets ― and keep eyeing for the hottest trends available in the market today. For this purpose, we've tracked the hottest gadget trends for this year as well as what to anticipate in 2014. Check them out: 2013 Trends Samsung Galaxy S4 First unveiled in March, this Android smartphone manufactured by Korean company Samsung Electronics, is packed with the Jelly Bean VIEW DOCUMENT
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A Whistleblower’S Dilemma

931 words - 4 pages to her in the same way I would have spoken to myself if I were in her situation, I did not act as a physician, but instead, I acted as a concerned person who cares about that patient. The outcome was outstanding. The healing power of this can be way stronger than actual medicine. In the case study “the whistle-blower’s dilemma” the major ethical issue was the action of the hospital administrator and his conversation with Mrs. Lewis. This conversation is a very clear example for the “I-IT” relationship, in which the administrator concerns were to achieve a certain goal and maintain the hospital referrals and support his golf buddy without considering Mrs. Lewis point of view. On the other VIEW DOCUMENT
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Chicago Plastic Surgeon Fiona Wood, Inventor Of Cellspray

932 words - 4 pages ="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Perth_Hospital" title="Royal Perth Hospital">Royal Perth Hospitala> which treated 28 victims of the Bali bombings. After Marie adapted the technology to provide the quantities of cultures demanded by the crisis, the survival and rapid recovery of almost all the severely burned patients demonstrated how effective CellSpray® had become.Fiona, director of the West Australian Burns Unit at the Royal Perth Hospital, had long committed herself to accelerating the healing of burns victims. Using standard skin culture techniques, grafts generally take two to three weeks to prepare. But about 75 percent of the scarring from burns VIEW DOCUMENT
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Psychedelic Drugs.

2353 words - 9 pages societies, and customs unique to those societies.As humans, we are apt to share our healing powers. In doing so, healing practices have incorporated the use of drugs in all cultures. In the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States" title="United States">United Statesa>, almost everyone seeks health from practitioners who prescribe pharmaceuticals to the patient. Physicians prescribe these substances to eradicate illness and disease within the patient. In a sense, Americans have become accustomed to the availability drugs, legal and illegal, controlled and uncontrolled. Most Americans have developed a faith in their doctors, putting trust in them high above everyone else in VIEW DOCUMENT
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Shouldice Hospital Limited: Example.

2282 words - 9 pages specially constructed stairs and come to the common room to avail of these facilities. This has a dual impact. Firstly the patient recovers mentally and considers himself fit and healthy. Secondly the little exercise helps in fast healing.* Market Segment:The target market for Shouldice Hospital was basically healthy people who they perceived would heal and recover faster. Also these patients were the ones who were detected with a primary inguinal, which was the most common kind of hernia. More complicated cases, especially those involving patients with other health problems, were not undertaken.This kind of target market served several advantages.The primary advantage VIEW DOCUMENT
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Techniques To Improve Rest And Rest Within The Hospital

1092 words - 4 pages The founders of nursing acknowledged the need for sleep and rest to aid the body in healing, but with 60% of patients requesting a sedative, this shows the hospital environment is not one that promotes sleep and rest. There is renewed interest in exploring the best nonpharmacological methods of helping achieve sleep and rest while in the hospital to promote healing (Robinson, Weitzel, & Henderson, 2005). Evidence-Based Practice As nurses frequently interact with the patients, they are the ones exploring evidence-based practice to identify ways to modify the hospital environment and use more nonpharmacological methods to promote sleep to help the body repair itself (Robinson et al., 2005 VIEW DOCUMENT
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Western Views Of Non-Traditional Medicines

2567 words - 10 pages ." It goes on to state, "A third of the people we serve already use alternative therapies. Now they have access to the first credentialed network of alternative care practitioners. It includes acupuncturists, chiropractors, massage therapists and nutritionists, to name a few... In traditional health care, specialty care has been focused more on isolated treatments versus overall healing... We're building a system that rewards healing, not just treatment." The ad has a picture of an inserted acupuncture needle and a caption reads, "Why doesn't every health plan realize that no two people should be treated the same"(New Yrok Times 4/1/97). All of the above is the language of Eastern medical VIEW DOCUMENT
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Hospital Risk Management

1038 words - 4 pages utilize systems to reduce the opportunity for human error. (Bonser, 2002)What is a Sentinel Event?A Sentinel Event is a subset of adverse events specified by the Department of Human Services (DHS). These events rarely occur but are more serious and are therefore reported to DHS and investigated immediately using a root cause analysis process. DHS describes a Sentinel Event as a relatively infrequent, clear-cut event that occurs independently of a patient's condition. They commonly reflect hospital systems and process deficiencies and result in unnecessary outcomes for patients. (Bonser, 2002)DHS has specifically VIEW DOCUMENT
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Annotated Bibliography on Antibiotic

1123 words - 4 pages tertiary care hospital in Gujarat, India. Pharmacol Pharmacother. 2(3): 158–164. Jeffrey SA, Cianci P (1997) Diabetic wounds. Diab Spect. 4(2): 118-123. Krige JEJ, Beckingham JI (2001) Liver abscesses and hydatid disease. BMJ. 23:322-537. Jone SK, Tripleff RG (1992) The relationship of cigarette smoking to impaired intra-oral wound healing: a review evidence and implication for patient care. J oral Maxillo Surg. 50:237-40. Kelwin W.S. (1999) Anti microbial therapy for diabetic foot infections. Post Grad. Med. 106: 22-28. Khorvash F, Mostafavizadeh K, Mobasherizadeh S, Behjati M, Naeini AE, Rostami S, Memarzadeh M, Khorvash FA. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of microorganisms VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Placebo Reaction And The Effectiveness Of Unconscious Healing

1691 words - 7 pages pharmaceutical drugs is growing and that they are strong enough to take a recognized place in our care of patients. Healing Power of Placebo Discovered Interest in the power of placebos in healing was explored by Dr. Henry Knowles Beecher (1904–1976), an anesthesiologist at the Massachusetts General Hospital, who noted that severely injured soldiers in the combat zone were less likely to ask for pain relievers compared to similarly injured soldiers who were being treated in civilian hospitals. He theorized that soldiers being treated in the field may have been able to bear their sufferings because of the relief of having survived the war and that they looked forward to being treated, while those VIEW DOCUMENT
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Faith And Spirituality

1575 words - 6 pages RLST 1107 EL10EssayDone By: Sydney Paluzzi - 233310Due Date: March 18th, 2011Quantities of people around the world do not follow organized religions however pursue spirituality. "Spirituality refers to the unique and intense experience of a reality greater than oneself or an experience of connection with the totality of things". (Bailey, 23) An individual does not have to be religious in order to have a spiritual experience. The benefits of spirituality include humbleness, inner strength and peace, hope, sense of meaning and purpose in life, healing, acceptance of self and others, sense of VIEW DOCUMENT
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Waves: The Way They Have Revolutionized The Healthcare Industry.

741 words - 3 pages , especially if you're someone who is on their feet for most of the day. It's attractive for people to try because of the amount of time it takes, which is way less, the lack of post-operation complications, and since the surface of the skin was never broken, there is not even a remote chance of infections in the treated area. The estimated healing time after an ESWT as opposed to regular surgery is phenomenally less. ESWT takes only four to five days of immobility to fully recover from (American College Foot and Ankle Surgeons), as opposed to four to five months like with traditional heel surgery.The treatment itself involves blasting the area to be "operated" on with very intense sound waves VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Healing Energy Of The Body

1355 words - 5 pages hospitals and nursing homes battle every day is the slow healing time that the elderly experience. After a lifetime of healing wounds, their bodies aren’t as efficient in wound healing and there is often health issues piled on top that complicate the healing process. My grandmother is 83 years old and within the last five years, she has experienced a knee replacement and multiple hospitalizations from heart complications. Each time she was admitted to the hospital, there was a scary time when my whole family thought there was a possibility that she wouldn’t make it. Today, she is as healthy and active as an 83 year old can be but it took a long time after her knee surgery for her to make a VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Prophet Habakkuk: His Prophecy And An Explanation

598 words - 2 pages . The two most common interpretations are either “embraced” or refers to a flower which was often used as a healing instrument (Szeles, 5). Habakkuk’s life was quite clouded and difficult to follow but he wasn’t erased from the face of the earth. Habakkuk wrote his own book, and it is estimated to have been written between 608-605 B.C. He is referred to as a prophet, but this is believed to be inserted later as an attempt to give an explanation of who he was (Smith). Habakkuk’s book is very strange in the way it is written and what includes, and lacks. Habakkuk wrote his book completely as a dialogue with God (Szeles, 7). There is no stop in the conversation to describe place, time, or VIEW DOCUMENT
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Applied Paper

1095 words - 4 pages It was believed a seizure in the brain caused by the electric current would stimulate the release of neurotransmitters, and would allow the brain to reorganize to function correctly (Nasar). Neurotransmitters are chemical substances that transmit signals that facilitate cell to cell communication throughout the nervous system, and play a key component in the biological paradigm for treatment of schizophrenia. At this early stage of understanding schizophrenia’s pathology, it was believed these chemicals were imbalanced and shocking the brain would force a rebalance of these vital chemicals. Once rebalanced, it was hypothesized the patient would no longer suffer from schizophrenia (Tharyan VIEW DOCUMENT
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Identify & Explore Metapardigm Concepts Of Nursing

2632 words - 11 pages four metaparadigm concepts of nursing.Within the development of nursing theories, there is recognition of common themes and concepts. A concept of a subject is related to the way it is viewed and can be a way of classifying a theme when applied to a particular area (Pearson, Vaughan & Fitzgerald, 1997). Fawcett (1984) identifies the four main concepts or themes central to nursing as including; health, environment, person and nurse. These four concepts, the recurring themes and the inter-relationships between them are described as nursing's metaparadigm.Metaparadigm is the combination of two words, meta and paradigm. According to Mosby's (1994) definition, Meta, can mean VIEW DOCUMENT
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Differences In Health Care Illustrated In Anne Fadiman's The Character Catches You And Also You Fall Down

1737 words - 7 pages middle of this great conflict. The two Hmong cultural values that were demonstrated by the Lee family are portrayed by their belief and view about the cause and method of cure for an illness. The Lee family comes from a culture that believes in holistic healing. They have an animalistic view about health and medicine. For instance an epileptic is seen as someone who has been chosen to be a healer. Most Hmong epileptic are shamans, therefore even though the Lee’s wish that their daughter’s illness will be cured, they also have a mixture of pride because “although shamanism is an arduous calling that require years of training with a master in order to learn the ritual techniques and chants, it VIEW DOCUMENT
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Albert Schweitzer

1325 words - 5 pages that prize was used to build a new building in his camp at Lambaréné to house lepers. He won this at the ripe old age of 78.10 Shortly before she died, Schweitzer's wife asked him how long he planned to stay in Africa. He could only reply in one way: "As long as I draw breath."11 In 1965, Schweitzer, musician, author, philosopher, and physician, died at the age of ninety, still working at his hospital in Africa. Though it may seem he started late in life, changing careers twice, Schweitzer still spent almost fifty years working in Africa, healing sick people who would otherwise have died. More than merely a doctor, Schweitzer was a great humanitarian, who cared for thousands of people in a VIEW DOCUMENT