Juvenile Delinquency Essay Examples

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Juvenile Delinquency Essay

1672 words - 7 pages Juvenile Delinquency Everyday we read in the newspaper or watch T.V and hear news of crimes committed by Juveniles. With all of the crime being reported by the media about juveniles, one can’t help but wonder if all of our nation’s youth are juvenile delinquents. Although there are many cases where the juvenile did not commit a serious crime, there are others where the crime is so bad the juvenile court system tries the juvenile as an adult. Instead of seeking help for the individual, our justice system places them in adult facilities to “teach them a lesson.” The justice system fails to see what the cause of this outbreak is in a child whether it was abuse, neglect, or where they grew up VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Delinquency Essay

997 words - 4 pages Remember doing something mischievous or wrong when you were a kid and getting the label "delinquent" slapped on you? Did you ever wonder what it meant? The legal term "juvenile delinquency" was established so that young lawbreakers could avoid the disgrace of being classified in legal records as criminals. Juvenile delinquency laws were designed to provide treatment, rather than punishment, for juvenile offenders. Young delinquents are usually sent to juvenile courts, where the main aim is to rehabilitate offenders, rather than punish them. But, the term "juvenile delinquency" itself has come to imply VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Delinquency Essay

1240 words - 5 pages >Two of the main factors influencing juvenile delinquency are the family structure that a child is exposed to and the relationships adolescents have with parents. As with patterns of juvenile delinquency, family structure in the United States has also changed dramatically over the last century, becoming very diverse in today's society. Adolescents of all ages are living in many various types of homes, such as with single, married and cohabiting parents. The families that children grow up in and the social environment in which they live can have major effects on their VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Delinquency Essay

1172 words - 5 pages : crime, harassment, bullying, dating violence, carrying weapons at school and auto violence, including the attempt or suicidal ideation. Katner , 2006) There have been cases where children have experienced a traumatic event in childhood, mostly related to the consumption of alcohol by a relative. Each traumatic event increased 35 percent to 144 the risk of committing a criminal act. Among girls the risk of committing violence increases between 1.7 and 5 times compared to those who had a happy childhood, regardless of how off the event. In the case of boys the risk is 77 times larger. Discussion In common parlance, there is an understanding of juvenile delinquency as meaning adolescents VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Delinquency Essay - 3502 words

3502 words - 14 pages On any given day you cannot open up a newspaper or turn on a televisionand not find an article or a broadcast about juveniles committing crimes, but thequestion is who is to be blamed for the juvenile delinquency of our Jamaican society?Juvenile delinquency is a violation of the law by a juvenile not punishable by deathor life imprisonment. The government follows a policy that no crime goesunpunished. The controversy that surrounds courtrooms today is whether or not ajuvenile should stand trial as an adult and be punished like an adult for committingserious offenses. One side believes that juveniles should be punished VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Delinquency Essay - 1000 words

1000 words - 4 pages The two websites I found that promote community involvement in the prevention of juvenile delinquency are http://www.uncjin.org/Standards/Rules/r12/r12.html and http://www.safeyouth.org/scripts/teens/docs/community.pdf. The first website discusses the fundamental principles, scope of the guidelines, general principles and socialization processes of juvenile delinquency prevention. Their beliefs are that juveniles can develop non-criminal attitudes "by engaging in lawful, socially useful activities and adopting a humanistic orientation" (Guidelines for the Prevention of VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Delinquency Essay

2147 words - 9 pages must be identified. “Family Life, Delinquency, and Crime: A Policymaker’s Guide,”compiled by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, introduces us to the theory that the family structure is a precursor to delinquent behavior. The authors and research contributors cite various family “dysfunctions” that contribute to delinquent behavior. Some of the family dysfunctions that the authors focus on are; parental criminality, parental interaction, parental supervision, and single-parent families. Parental criminality plays an important role in relation to delinquency, but based upon the stdies reviewed, poor parenting appears to be among the most powerful predictors of juvnile VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Courts and Juvenile Delinquency Essay

1392 words - 6 pages , flourishing and returning to society. Every year, juvenile’s courts in the United States handle an estimated 1.7 million cases in which the youth was charged with a delinquency offense. In 2007 juvenile courts handled about 4,600 delinquency cases per day. The trends in juvenile court cases paralleled the decline in arrests of persons under 18. In 1996 more than half the cases waived to criminal court were non-violent, meaning that most juveniles commit lesser crimes that require only rehab to fix. Too many children are prosecuted as adults for crimes that do not fit the punishment. Latest statistics say that 67% of juvenile defendants in adult court are, African American; 77% of juveniles VIEW DOCUMENT
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Reducing Juvenile Delinquency Essay

617 words - 2 pages Reducing Juvenile Delinquency � PAGE �1� Running Head: REDUCING JUVENILE DELINQUENCYReducing Juvenile Delinquency�Reducing Juvenile DelinquencyIntroductionThe legal term "juvenile delinquency" was established so that young lawbreakers could avoid the disgrace of being classified in legal records as criminals. Juvenile delinquency laws were designed to provide treatment, rather than punishment, for juvenile offenders. Young delinquents are usually sent to juvenile courts, where the main aim is to VIEW DOCUMENT
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Reducing Juvenile Delinquency Essay

3076 words - 12 pages The current statistics of juvenile delinquency are astounding. I will look at the most recent statistics and a few of the programs implemented to reduce or prevent delinquency. Before delving too deep into juvenile delinquency, it is important to consider the definitions of "juvenile" and "delinquent". The Merriam-Webster Dictionary gives two definitions of "juvenile": 1. Showing incomplete development, and 2. A young person; one below the legally established age of adulthood (1997). Merriam-Webster defines "delinquent" as: offending by neglect or violation of duty or law (1997). As a complete definition of juvenile delinquent it is safe to repeat "a person below the established VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Delinquency: Genetic or Environmental

2580 words - 10 pages Juvenile Delinquency: Genetic or Environmental “Oh, well, I’ll end up in jail anyway! It’s in my genes!” This was the heartfelt declaration of a 15 year-old teen. Was it inevitable that he follow in his father’s footsteps on the path of delinquent behavior and subsequent brushes with the law? Was juvenile delinquency actually a by-product of genetics or could it be a product of “behavioral sink”- that environmental abyss that absorbs so many teens? Definition of delinquency Although arguable on both sides, environment clearly has the lead in determining juvenile behavior. The very definition of juvenile delinquency states: “Delinquency is a major social problem VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Delinquency in the States

2135 words - 9 pages Juvenile Delinquency in the States Presently, juvenile justice is widely acknowledged as being in a state of flux in the United States. The early 1990s saw the most substantial rise in violent crime committed by juveniles ever experienced in this country. On the heels of decades of skepticism about the effectiveness of parens patriae (the state as parent), this rise was the "proof" for many "experts" who believe that the juvenile justice system should be abolished. These skeptics reason that one criminal court could still have some latitude when sentencing younger offenders, but that kids are now committing adult crimes, so it is time to treat them as adults. Fortunately, this is VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

2261 words - 9 pages Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Matsueda, R. L. (1982). Testing control theory and differential association: A causal modeling approach. American sociological review, 489-504. Matsueda, R. L., & Anderson, K. (1998). The dynamics of delinquent peers and delinquent behavior*. Criminology, 36(2), 269-308. Snyder, J., Dishion, T. J., & Patterson, G. R. (1986). Determinants and consequences of associating with deviant peers during preadolescence and adolescence. The Journal of Early Adolescence. Warr, M. (1996). Organization and instigation in delinquent groups*. Criminology, 34(1), 11-37. VIEW DOCUMENT
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Approaches to Solving Juvenile Delinquency

1110 words - 4 pages Throughout generations the rate of delinquency has rocketed. The government has reformed different laws and amendments to protect the community. Delinquency has been taken advantage and will remain to, if the proper action isn't taken place. If the government has such an authoritative power, why are the numbers still increasing? The first priority of the government shouldn’t be the safety of community, but the imprisonment or the captivity of the individuals performing the careless acts. From the day the juvenile has been given a sentence till the day the sentence has expired this individual should be given extra attention to. This individual has the ability to commit crimes that VIEW DOCUMENT
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Female Juvenile Delinquency in Canada

695 words - 3 pages Female Juvenile Delinquency in Canada  The punishment for girls was much more harsh in the early days of Canada’s history when crime was seen as an intolerable part of town life.  Young girls of age thirteen and fourteen were often hanged for theft in the mid to late 17th century Quebec or put in detention centres (usually a hospital) for as much as six years at a time (Carrigan 8).  Age was sometimes taken into consideration for serious crimes and so whipping and branding was used instead of execution.  The practise in Halifax in 1815 was to whip a girl thirty-nine times at the community whipping post (Carrigan 37).  The most common problem among girls during this time and in the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Delinquency in the Classroom

1634 words - 7 pages In depicting juvenile delinquency in the classroom, a few film directors portrayed novice teachers' desire to reach what the school system customarily labeled as "problem students." These films illustrate that these students are often categorized quickly and unfairly, and hopeful intervention by a few caring and zealous teachers is enough to change their lives and attitudes for the better. In the black and white 1955 film "Blackboard Jungle," Mr. Dadier (played by Glenn Ford) was an idealistic teacher on his first job in a tough urban mostly white male high school. The characters were dressed in clothing of the time (jeans rolled up at the cuffs, tee shirts, bow ties, baseball caps VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Delinquency Case Studies in Justice System

1485 words - 6 pages 1,600 juvenile delinquents under the age of 12 years, in 1995, the number more than doubled to 3,400, and in 2005, the number rose to 4,700. During the same time period, the numbers grew from 31,400 in 1985, to 64,500 in 1995, and reached 77,600 across the United States of America (USA) for juvenile delinquents in the 13 to 15 age group (Puzzanchera and Kang, 2008).As the rate of juvenile delinquency across the USA skyrockets, we begin to take a closer look at the juvenile systems in place and the factors that contribute to juvenile delinquency. According to Merrian-Webster Online Dictionary, juvenile VIEW DOCUMENT
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Literature Review: Poverty and Juvenile Delinquency

1807 words - 7 pages ................................................................................................................................ 6 Victimization ........................................................................................................................... 6 Literature Review: Poverty and Juvenile Delinquency Family Factors This section will examine some of the family issues that previous research has found to correlate to juvenile delinquency. First, the parenting strategies within families will be explored. Then, there will be a look into the financial status of the families and child delinquency. Third, this paper will examine the lives of homeless youth and their VIEW DOCUMENT
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Developmental Crime Prevention and Juvenile Delinquency

2391 words - 10 pages Background One of the best strategies for combating juvenile delinquency is adopting developmental crime prevention program. Developmental crime prevention programs aim to lower an individual’s potential of becoming criminal. The theory that guides these types of programs is that criminal and deviant activity is the result of early life experiences and learning. These programs put an emphasis on what causes individuals to commit deviant acts in order to identify ways that this activity can be stopped (Lab, 2014). A key piece to developmental crime prevention programs is identifying risk and protective factors for offending. A risk factor is any variable increases the probability of VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Boot Camps Do Not Reduce Juvenile Delinquency

3174 words - 13 pages Introduction Juvenile delinquency is a relatively new phenomenon. For this reason, society’s reactions and solutions to the problem of delinquency are also modern developments. The United States developed the first youth court in 1899 and is now home to many new and formerly untested methods of juvenile rehabilitation and correction. One of many unique programs within the Juvenile Justice system, boot camps are institutions designed to keep delinquent juveniles out of traditional incarceration facilities and still provide a structured method of punishment and rehabilitation. Boot camps developed in the early 1990s and quickly proliferated throughout the nation. Specifically, they are VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Delinquency - 1330 words

1330 words - 5 pages Over the years, countless efforts have been made to find a comprehensive explanation for delinquency. The results of these efforts have offered possible reasons as being both biological and social. It is still debatable as to what forces have the greatest influence on youth crime, but it is undoubted that several factors clearly make an impact. The direct relationships a child has with concrete social elements, like his family and friends, are likely to give some intimation of his involvement in crime. However, it must be noted that there are more abstract contexts for socialization that also exist as potential explanations for a child’s behavior. The most prominent of these less VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Marxist Crime Perspective on Juvenile Delinquency of African Americans

3121 words - 12 pages Introduction Countless studies from respected sociologists, criminologists, and psychologists have suggested several theories as to why juvenile delinquency exists. The theory this paper uses to explain juvenile delinquency is the Marxist perspective of the Conflict Theory. What this paper seeks to achieve is to show how this theory is conceptualized, how it causes juvenile delinquency particularly for African Americans, statistics on African American juveniles, and why it could lead to a life of crime as juveniles transition into adulthood. In addition to this, the government will be examined on how it uses the legal system, law enforcement, and certain officials to control most of the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile delinquency with reference to school violence in secondary schools.

4721 words - 19 pages Juvenile Delinquency in the form of School Violence at Secondary Schools in Trinidad and TobagoViolence in Trinidad and Tobago has been escalating as is reflected in the high crime rates in society. Youth violence especially in schools has become a common feature of life in Trinidad and Tobago. Everyday newspaper headlines in Trinidad and Tobago expose the worrying dimension of school violence for all stakeholders in the VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Curfew: Issues on Juvenile Delinquency and Constitutional Rights

2513 words - 10 pages The Curfew � PAGE �1� Running Head: THE CURFEWThe Curfew: Issues on Juvenile Delinquency and Constitutional RightsThe Curfew: Issues on Juvenile Delinquency and Constitutional RightsIntroductionJuvenile crime is becoming a threat to society as years go by. Crimes committed by children below 15 have been reported as early as the 19th century, when they faced about the same punishments as adult criminals: public shaming, incarceration, even execution by hanging. At least 10 juveniles who were under 14 at the time of their VIEW DOCUMENT
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Impact of Television in Relation To Juvenile Delinquency

2433 words - 10 pages IMPACT OF TELEVISION VIOLENCEIN RELATION TO JUVENILE DELINQUENCYTABLE OF CONTENTSIntroductionEffects Of Television - The BeginningCorrelational ExperimentsField ExperimentsCause And Effects On Types Of ChildrenConclusionReferences 113568When children are taught how to tie their shoes, it is because of how their parents showed them. When children are taught how to do math problems it is because how their teachers show them. With all of the role models how does television effect our children?Many adults feel that because they watched television when they VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile delinquency, the extent, some suggestions on what it's caused by, and what is being done in various communities to deal with this growing problem

930 words - 4 pages Do you remember doing something mischievous or wrong when you were a kid and getting the label 'delinquent' slapped on you ? Did you ever wonder what it meant ? That is what my topicfor today is . . . juvenile delinquency. In this report I will: define juveniledelinquency, give the extent of juvenile delinquency, give some suggestions on what causesjuvenile delinquency, and what is being done in various communities to deal with thisgrowing problem.The legal term juvenile delinquent was established so that younglawbreakers could avoid the disgrace of being classified in legal records as criminals.Juvenile delinquency laws were designed to VIEW DOCUMENT
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Childhood Delinquence. Definition, the extent, causes, and what has been done to deal with the problem

936 words - 4 pages Remember doing something mischievous or wrong when you were a kid and getting the label'delinquent' slapped on you ? Did you ever wonder what it meant ? That is what my topicfor today is . . . juvenile delinquency. In this report I will: define juveniledelinquency, give the extent of juvenile delinquency, give some suggestions on what causesjuvenile delinquency, and what is being done in various communities to deal with thisgrowing problem. The legal term juvenile delinquent was established so that younglawbreakers could avoid the disgrace of being classified in legal records as criminals.Juvenile delinquency laws were designed to provide VIEW DOCUMENT
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The United States Juvenile Justice System.

868 words - 3 pages /Juvenile_Justice_and_Delinquency_Prevention_Act" title="Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act">Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974) and many other changes, were not consistent in how they were administered across the country. Beginning in the late 1960s through the mid-1980s, rulings of the Supreme Court defined for juveniles many of the same due process protections that adults had, including provisions for notice of the charges, cross-examination of witnesses, counsel, and the need to establish proof beyond a reasonable doubt. The Supreme Court also established that juveniles may be subject to penalties and other punishments associated with the adult system (e.g., preventive VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Justice in USA

869 words - 3 pages Juvenile JusticeThe Juvenile Justice System as it typically functions in America's thousands of jurisdictions is the subject that will be covered. The Juvenile Justice System is defined as that 'sociolegal process having responsibility and authority for public reaction to current juvenile delinquency and deterrence of future juvenile delinquency, including within that process the public and private agents, agencies, laws, rules, and policies having to do with juvenile delinquency'(Weiner, 1987, p.12). This paper will deal with the history of the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Justice Policy Reform

991 words - 4 pages Juvenile Justice Policy ReformIt is a disturbing fact that the number of delinquency cases handled by juvenile courts increased 43% between 1985 and 2000 (Office of Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention, 2000). According to Snyder (2000), "Delinquency offences are acts committed by juveniles that would be crimes if committed by adults." (OJJDP, 2000). Here is the question to discuss. What causes these youth to behave the way to get involved in the illegal acts, and who and how to deal with this problem? Indeed, this paper will discuss about the approaches and legal mechanisms that address the issue of juvenile delinquency.Apparently, juvenile justice policy has been VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Crime Statistics

715 words - 3 pages Juvenile Crime Statistics 2Juvenile Crime StatisticsTania IversenCJA/374 - Juvenile Justice Systems and ProcessesApril 10, 2014Jess GutierrezJuvenile Crime StatisticsBy definition, a juvenile is considered a person under the age of 18 years old. A child or youth who commits a crime or is otherwise beyond the control of his or her parents is considered a juvenile delinquent. Juvenile crime has been an issue throughout the United States since the early 1800s, with the first court system being established in 1899 VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Justice System

1708 words - 7 pages . “The laws were designed to provide treatment, rather than punishment, for juvenile offenders” (Neubauer, 444) California is a decentralized state which means that delinquency services are organized at both the state and local level in California. County probation departments administer detention, commitment, delinquency intake screening, predisposition investigation, and probation supervision (Neubauer, 447). New Jersey is a combination state where the state operates most delinquency services for youth in New Jersey, with the exception of secure detention. However, responsibility is divided between the state judicial and state executive branches (Center on Juvenile & Criminal Justice VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Crime

543 words - 2 pages firearms available today have played a big role in the increase of juveniles crimes.The most common risk factor is the demise of the family life and the increase in family violence. Between 1976 and 1992 the number of juveniles living in poverty grew 42% and this caused an increase in crimes by juveniles. Many of these juvenile criminals have been abused or neglected and they also grew up in a single-parent household. Research has found that 53% of these children are more likely to be arrested, and 38% more likely to commit a violent crime as an adult, then their counterparts who did not VIEW DOCUMENT
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Social Outcasts and Juvenile Deliquency

942 words - 4 pages Man was created to be a social being. Individuals always strive to belong to a group for their survival. Man has been known to have a strong liking of belonging to a group and greatly fears to be rejected or isolated (Wever, 2006). Society in some instances is known to reject or even isolate some individuals based on various reasons. Such individuals become unpopular, disliked, and sometimes are hated. As a result the social outcasts as they are simply referred to may develop a low self esteem and have a low social status. Social outcast are also hated, discriminated and persecuted by the society and as a result they may result into being depressed and lonely. Juvenile Delinquency refers VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Relationship Between Social Class and Delinquency

1451 words - 6 pages Most people have preconceived notions regarding the relationship between social class and delinquency. A common assumption is that lower-class juveniles are more likely to engage in delinquent behavior than their higher-class counterparts. Criminologists have performed a large number of studies examining the socio-demographic characteristics of delinquents, which often yielded contradictory results. When analyzing the extent and trend of juvenile delinquency in the United States conclusions can be drawn from estimates derived from arrest records, self-reports, and victimization data. Arrest estimates, self-reported information, and victimization data provide different estimates of the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Offenders: Race and Ethnicity

2146 words - 9 pages ="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juvenile_Justice_and_Delinquency_Prevention_Act" title="Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act">Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, (Pub. L. No. 93-415, 42 U.S.C. 5601 et seq.) Congress required that Massachusetts, which was participating in the Formula Grants Programs, determine if disproportionate minority confinement exists and, if so, demonstrate efforts to reduce it or risk losing future funding eligibility tied to state compliance (Walker, Spohn & DeLone, 2004).Massachusetts and the Experiment.While compiling information for this paper, I discovered that the state of MA had conducted an experiment in VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenille Delinquency in America

1641 words - 7 pages JUVENILE DELINQUENCY IN AMERICAThere is no doubt that various experts can give us many theories as to the causes of juvenile delinquency, including one's economic background, substance abuse, delinquent peer groups, repeated exposure to violence, and increased availability of firearms, however, I feel that the number one cause of juvenile delinquency is the breakdown of families, including lack of parental control over children. It is ironic in America, today, one must have a driver's license to operate a vehicle, a permit to own a gun and even a license to own a dog, but one does not have VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Crime Statistics

897 words - 4 pages to them if they committ a crime during their high school years. As long as the criminal justice system continues to stiffen its laws pertaining to juveniles I believe there will continue to be a decrease in reported crime.ReferencesMcCurley, Carl., & Snyder, Howard N. (2004). Victims of Violent Juvenile Crime. Juvenile Justice Bulletin. Retrieved July 13, 2008, from Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention database.Snyder, Howard N. (2003). Juvenile Arrests 2001. Juvenile Justice Bulletin. Retrieved July 13, 2008, from Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention database.Steinberg, Laurence. (2004). Youth Violence. Retrieved July 13, 2008, from National Criminal Justice Reference Service database. VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Offenders: Race & Ethnicity

2044 words - 8 pages decision making concerning confinement. During the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, Congress required that Massachusetts, which was participating in the Formula Grants Programs, determine if disproportionate minority confinement exists and, if so, demonstrate efforts to reduce it or risk losing future funding eligibility tied to state compliance (Walker, Spohn & DeLone, 2004).While compiling information for this paper, I discovered that the state of MA had conducted an experiment in nineteen ninety nine concerning black youth. Although black youth represented approximately fifteen percent of the Massachusetts population between the ages of ten to seventeen in year VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Crime

2537 words - 10 pages . A misdemeanor is a less serious offense for which the offender may be sentenced to probation, county detention, a fine, or some combination of the three. Misdemeanors generally include crimes such as assault and battery, petty theft and public drunkenness. An infraction is the least serious offense and generally is punishable by a fine. Many motor vehicle violations are considered infractions. Juvenile crime, in law, is a term denoting various offenses committed by children or youths under the age of 18. Such acts are sometimes referred to as juvenile delinquency. Children's offenses typically include delinquent acts, which would be considered crimes if committed by adults, and VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Justice- Helpful or harmful?

1586 words - 6 pages the custody of parents or legal guardians. Cohen explains “ Such extralegal characteristics as the youth’s ethnicity, socioeconomic status, sex, home life, and lifestyle are often believed to have even greater impact on juvenile court decision-making than the particular delinquency in question Parenting plays a huge role in their teenagers life for they are solely responsible for their upbringing. Most children grow up with either no father or mother, and if they do have a father or mother, chances are they have no education, do drugs, are alcoholics, or are abusive with their kids. When growing up in a ruined household the chances of that teenager being successful is slim to none. Being VIEW DOCUMENT
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JUVENILE CRIME STATISTICS PAPER

821 words - 3 pages Justice Programs. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Juvenile Justice Bulletin. Juvenile Arrests 2001. Retrieved July 24, 2008, from http://www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/ojjdp/201370.pdf VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Crime

931 words - 4 pages , the juvenile crime rate has increased by over 62 percent for violent crimes. (violent crimes include the following: murder, manslaughter, rape, and robbery).      Since      1995 the overall crime rate for people under 17 has dropped by 39 percent. In 1999, there were 7,928 arrests for every 100,000 youths in the United States. The rate of juvenile crimes involving a firearm is higher on school days than non-school days. Statistics on Juvenile Court Case Flow Of every 1,000 petitioned adjudicated delinquency cases handled in 1997, 177 resulted in formal probation and 94 resulted in residential placement following adjudication. In many VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile justice

1927 words - 8 pages /Juvenile_Justice_and_Delinquency_Prevention_Act" title="Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act">Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, (Pub. L. No. 93-415, 42 U.S.C. 5601 et seq.) Congress required that Massachusetts, which was participating in the Formula Grants Programs, determine if disproportionate minority confinement exists and, if so, demonstrate efforts to reduce it or risk losing future funding eligibility tied to state compliance (Walker, Spohn & DeLone, 2004).Although black youth represented approximately 15 percent of the Massachusetts population between the ages of 10-17 in 1999, they represented 26 percent of all the juvenile arrests VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile and Adult Courts - A Comparative Analysis

1522 words - 6 pages abolished and implications for young offenders.Compare and ContrastThe juvenile court system has been in existence since 1899 (Kerbs, n.d.). Although this does not show how long juvenile crimes have been taking place, it does give one a glimpse into how long juvenile crime has been taken to courts. Politically, both sides of the spectrum; liberals as well as conservatives "are calling for the abolition of the juvenile court's jurisdiction over delinquency adjudications" (Kerbs, n.d.). Sadly, crimes that juveniles are committing have become more violent including rape and murder and although they are still, in fact children, they must still be punished for their crime. In most cases, a child VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Canadian Juvenile Justice System

1131 words - 5 pages have the same intelligence as adults to know the consequences of doing wrong things. Thus, children who were convicted of criminal would face the same penalties and were treated as adult offenders (The evolution of, 2009, p1). However, sometimes, penalties went beyond justice – these children would receive harsh punishment for minor criminal acts. As a result, the first Canadian law on juvenile crime, the Juvenile Delinquency Act (JDA), was adopted by Canada in 1908. 7-15 year old (in some cases, a maximum of 17years) young people are confined under this Law. The courts, as the judicial role of parents, had to decide whether the young people should bear the consequences for their crimes. If VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Courts

2445 words - 10 pages There is ongoing debate as to what should be done with juvenile courts. Should juvenile courts be abolished or just reformed? There are a number of reasons offered for each viewpoint, and the ultimate goal is trying to figure out which option would be most beneficial for juveniles. Juvenile delinquency is a continuous problem in the United States. It is also considered an issue that all of society needs to take part in trying to solve or at least diminish. Despite the number of social controls that can aid in dealing with delinquency much of the burden is placed on the juvenile justice system. It is well understood that the juvenile courts have a lot of imperfections. These VIEW DOCUMENT
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"Juveniles' delinquency in the United Arab Emirates" OMAR ALALI 2005

5355 words - 21 pages 1. Introduction:During the last few years, the problem of juveniles' delinquency has emerged as a significant subject in the United Arab Emirates (see Appendix 1). This in fact not only because it is a new menace swept the country, but also because of the dramatic increase in the number of juvenile offenders in the U.A.E. According to the ministry of interior's statistics (2004), the rates of juveniles' delinquents have increased by 1376% between 1977 and 2003.Many societies worldwide are becoming more and more concerned about the problem of juveniles' delinquency. This in fact not VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Justice

676 words - 3 pages child protection actions, contested parental divorce, and delinquency offenses (American Academy of Pediatrics, 1999). They must appear in juvenile court or, in some jurisdictions, they are called family courts. Caldwell (1961) states that with juvenile courts in place neglect, dependency and delinquency cases entered this platform and casework grew. It was questioned whether some cases could be handled by welfare agencies. However, many of these cases were interrelated. Today age-specific treatment of youth delinquents, effective rehabilitation of youth, the state acting as parens patriae, and which cases should be handled in juvenile courts are all still at the fore of public and scholarly concern. VIEW DOCUMENT
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Juvenile Homicide Can Be Prevented

2365 words - 9 pages them from committing homicidal acts when they get older. In fact the social learning theory, general strain theory, and social control theory point to the idea that juvenile homicide can be prevented. General Statistics Before learning about why juveniles commit homicide, who the juvenile homicide offenders are, and what causes juvenile homicide, it is crucial to understand the basic statistics of juvenile homicide in the United States. According to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, in 1993 there was the largest number of juvenile homicide offenders being 14.4 per 100,000 juvenile United States citizens. Since then, the number of juvenile homicide offenders VIEW DOCUMENT