Old Imperialism Essay Examples

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The Pros and Cons of Imperialism

531 words - 2 pages Throughout history, many powerful nations interfered with nations that were weaker than they were. This form of sabotaging a nation is economic, political or cultural life is called as imperialism. Imperialism is often separated into two sects. The first one is old imperialism, which was the period from the 1500s to the 1800s, where European nation started to colonize many areas such as the Americas, and parts of Southeast Asia. On the other hand, the new imperialism was the period between the years “1870-1914”, where Europe became more focused on expanding their land into Asia and Africa. Imperialism had many pros and cons. In addition, it also had many causes led by the feeling of... VIEW DOCUMENT
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A Comparison of J. A. Hobson and V. I. Lenin’s Historical Interpretations of Imperialism

848 words - 3 pages

Jessica Fennell

Hist 4000

September 17, 2014

A Comparison of J. A. Hobson and V. I. Lenin's Historical Interpretations of Imperialism

As defined by Merriam-Webster Dictionary, imperialism is a policy or practice by which a country increases its power by gaining control over other areas of the world.� J. A. Hobson and V. I. Lenin constructed their own definition and analysis of the matter. Hobson, an English journalist, addressed his capitalist theories in Imperialism: A Study, � and Lenin composed his marxist theory in

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The Elephant as a Symbol for Imperialism in "Shooting an Elephant”

1264 words - 5 pages In “Shooting an Elephant,” Orwell retold an occasion where he was struggling to come to a final decision of whether to shoot the elephant or not. With his final decision, the elephant finally lay dying in front of thousands of people. He said that he was forced to shoot it because the Burmese people were expecting him to do that. In addition, he also explained that he had to do it “to avoid looking like a fool” in front of the crowd (14). At first glance, one would think that it makes sense for him to kill the elephant to save his face, but that was not the case. He effectively uses this incident to demonstrate the “real nature of imperialism” (3), whereas the elephant represents the British... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Joseph chamberlain Essay

1288 words - 5 pages

Joseph Chamberlain can be rightly termed as the father of imperialism. Imperialism was the policy of acting as a nation's authority figure or leader, and by the establishment of economic and political hegemony over other nations. (http://www.infoplease.com) Joseph Chamberlain promoted British imperialism with full vigor; in his eyes, England was destined to control the whole world. Joseph Chamberlain was born in 1836, and at the age of 38 was elected as the lord mayor of Birmingham....

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Pre-World War I Imperialism in Europe

2300 words - 9 pages

One glance at a modern world map shows Europe as significantly smaller than its neighbouring landmasses. Yet at one time, most of the world was dominated by European flags. This era is known as the “Age of Imperialism” and was developed in major European countries in the 19th and 20th centuries. Powerful nations, such as Great Britain, France, and Germany, sought to expand their empires through colonizing mainly parts of Asia and Africa. This age led to great industrial growth; yet there were many unanticipated results, such as the Balkan Wars, Moroccan Crises, and ultimately, the initiation of World War...

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Imperialism and Free Trade Essay

2094 words - 8 pages Imperialism and Free Trade Like many terms used with the study of empire, the term Imperialism is considerably loaded, with many negative connotations. Modern political understanding of the word often suggests an illegitimate desire to extend one’s power or authority for reasons of self-advantage, be it national or individual. The British Empire is often considered to be imperialistic, largely due to its heavy reliance on mercantilist economic practices to sustain its hold throughout the world. The protectionist ways of the empire could arguably be seen as the definition and very nature of the empire itself with acts like the navigation acts... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Imperialism is the policy of extending a nation's authority by territorial acquisition or by the establishment of economic and political hegemony over other nations.

1233 words - 5 pages

Imperialism is the policy of extending a nation's authority by territorial acquisition or by the establishment of economic and political hegemony over other nations. Old Imperialism took place before the onset of the Industrial revolution, during that time period contact and the ability to conquer lands was limited due to the fact of a lack of technology and knowledge. During the years 1870-1914, there was a new Imperialism, in which the Europeans used knowledge and technology from the Industrial Revolution to build their extensive empires. There were many reasons for this new branch of imperialism....

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The Effects of Western Imperialism on China and Japan

628 words - 3 pages The Effects of Western Imperialism on China and Japan      China and Japan had very different experiences with Western Imperialism . Their reactions to western interference would lay a foundation for their destiny in a world that was rapidly progressing forward , leaving the traditional world behind .      China viewed themselves as totally self sufficient , superior , and the only truly civilized land in a barbarous world. They were inward looking and were encouraged by the conservative Confucianistic beliefs of their emperors to cling to the ancient and traditional ways of the past . They slid rapidly behind in industrial development , refusing to acknowledge the need for... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Effects of Imperialism in Africa

612 words - 2 pages Throughout history, imperialism has led countries to extend their rule over weaker countries and then colonized those countries to expand their own power. Imperialism allows the ruling countries to use the weaker countries for their resources. Colonizing other countries would then lead to growth and a better reputation for the dominating country. There are many examples of imperialism throughout European history. When many European countries “scrambled” for Africa, it seemed as though Africa had no say in anything. During the 19th century, Europe found a way to use Africa for their own growth and power. Using Africa for their resources, the Europeans colonized Africa without a second... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Imperialistic behavior of America during the late 19th Century

941 words - 4 pages In the years following the Civil War, the United States turned to rebuilding and isolation. However, as the century approached its close there was a turn towards expansion and imperialism. The politics of the Gilded Age, tainted with corruption and weak leadership, led to Americans to attempt to show their strength. The first imperialistic opportunity was presented to President Grover Cleveland. With a small scale revolution of white planters in Hawaii led to a call for the US annexation, however this was spurned by the president. Because there was no real way to expand the “empire” without violating the Monroe Doctrine, it became apparent that the only way the United States would be... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Around the World in Eighty Days

1215 words - 5 pages In the nineteenth, it seemed impossible to circumnavigate the world in only 80 days. That is, however, exactly what Phileas Fogg did in Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days. This novel follows the journey of the eccentric Englishman Phileas Fogg as he races around the world on a bet. Accompanied by his faithful servant, Passepartout, and a scheming detective, Fix, he encounters many challenges he must overcome in order to return in time. In Around the World in Eighty Days, Jules Verne demonstrates the increased industrialization of the nineteenth century, while also exploring the growing movements of nationalism and imperialism. Phileas Fogg’s journey is made possible by the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Travelling Around the World

1945 words - 8 pages In the nineteenth century, it seemed impossible to circumnavigate the world in only eighty days. That, however, was exactly what Phileas Fogg did in Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days. This novel follows the journey of the eccentric Englishman, Phileas Fogg, after he bet he could race around the world in eighty days. Accompanied by his faithful servant, Passepartout, and a scheming detective, Fix, he encountered many challenges he had to overcome in order to return in time to win the bet. In Around the World in Eighty Days, Jules Verne demonstrated how increased industrialization made a profound impact in travel, technology, and business. In addition, Verne shows how... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Shooting an Elephant

1356 words - 5 pages In the essay, Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell illustrates his experiences as a British police officer in Lower Burma, and reflects it to the nature of imperialism. Since “anti-European feeling was very bitter” due to the British Empire’s dictatorship in Burma, Orwell is being treated disrespectfully by the Burmese (12). This allows him to hate his job and the British Empire. However, the incident of shooting of an elephant gives him a “better glimpse … of the real nature of imperialism – the real motives for which despotic government act” (13). Through his life experiences as a British man, Orwell efficiently demonstrates the negative effects of imperialism on individuals and society. ... VIEW DOCUMENT
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How western Imperilism affects china and japan

697 words - 3 pages

Copyrights

I am handing over the copyrights to Jen Shriver upon doing so you accept this .

Thank you

Mike Sorrentino

Oct. 23, 1996

How Western Imperialism affects China and Japan

China and Japan had very different experiences with Western Imperialism . Their reactions to western interference would lay a foundation for their destiny in a world that was rapidly progressing forward , leaving the traditional world behind .

China viewed themselves as totally self sufficient , superior , and the only truly civilized land in a barbarous world. They were inward...

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Japan Change Over Time

1147 words - 5 pages Japan, an isolated island in the Pacific Ocean in East Asia, surprised the world when it first opened its doors to Western influence in 1854. While it had a strict policy about maintaining its isolation, it had no choice but to succumb to imperialism. When Commodore Matthew Perry visited, Japan realized that isolation had resulted in their inability to develop economically and militarily with the industrialized world. Thus from 1854 to 1914, Japan changed from being under the influence of imperialism to becoming an imperialist nation, as well as coming out of feudalism and going to into modern militarism. Despite all these changes in its economy and military, Japan had managed to consolidate... VIEW DOCUMENT
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British Imperialism in India and China

740 words - 3 pages British Imperialism in India and China Imperialism is the domination of a weaker country by a stronger country. For instance Britain dominated India and China in the mid 1880s to the beginning of the 20th century. Imperialism has had both a positive and negative effects on the countries involved. Britain was imperialistic for many reasons, it could dominate because it had the technology and power to do so. They also needed land to acquire raw materials for growing markets.      One country that had imperialism was India. By the mid-1880s, the British East India Company controlled three fifths of India. The cause of British domination was that the land was very diverse and the people... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Imperialism

1561 words - 6 pages Imperialism Imperialism Throughout time more powerful countries have extended their influence over weaker countries and then colonized those countries to expand their own power. Imperialism causes the stronger countries to grow and become nations or even empires. There are many examples throughout European history of nations enveloping weaker countries and increasing their own wealth and power to form strong nation-states and even empires. Through imperialism one culture is invading another culture and most of the time the European colonialists are not thinking about the effects this invasion might have on the natives of that land. Problems caused by imperialism have prevailed to this... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Colonialism In Three Texts

1685 words - 7 pages This essay will be about a comparative study of the representation of colonialism as a positive or negative force. The texts that are being used are my core text ‘Heart of Darkness’ by Joseph Conrad and ‘Collected Poems’ by Rudyard Kipling. The partner text will be ‘Swami and Friends’ by R. K. Narayan. ‘Heart of Darkness’ by Joseph Conrad was written in 1902 at the turn of the century. It is a novella and published in 3 parts in the Blackwood’s Magazine. It is regarded as a significant work of English literature and is part of the Western Cannon. The work was well received by a fairly bewildered Victorian Audience. Joseph Conrad born Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski was Polish-born. Conrad... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Charlie Don’t Surf: The Clash Protest Imperialism

1986 words - 8 pages By definition, imperialism is extending a country’s power and influence through diplomacy or military force. That ideology is best exemplified by the Vietnam War because the United States invaded North Vietnam to prevent the dissemination of Communism into South Vietnam, which is ultimately an attempt at exuding power and influence by using military force. The Clash recognized the homogeneity between the American imperialism of the Vietnam war and the forced Westernization of the non-Western world, particularly third world nations; thusly, the band chose the Vietnam War as a backdrop for “Charlie Don’t Surf” because of it’s relevance to American culture at the time. The Clash released the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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British Impact on Imperialism

1081 words - 4 pages

Meredith Enright

Mr. Riley

Honors World History

19 March 2014

British Impact on African Imperialism

Great Britain is known for the empire it built in the 19 th century. But what were the driving forces behind their expansion across the globe? It wasn't all about economics and money. The English felt they were taking on a moral role in assuming the "burden" of changing Africa into a place modeled after their own land. But really the burden fell on the people of Africa, and the British were the ones who benefited.

After the Industrial Revolution, Britain was one of the the most powerful countries in the world....

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Roosevelt's Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine

961 words - 4 pages Before considering Professor X’s assertion that the Roosevelt Corollary actually corrupted the Monroe Doctrine’s “benevolent intent,” it is worth considering whether or not the Monroe Docterine was as benevolent as the unnamed professor seems to suggest. Professor X considers Monroe’s 1823 Doctrine an act of benevolence, in which an increasingly dominant world power generously extends protection over its continental neighbors. Yet the Professor ignores the inherently imperialistic subtext that is contained within the Doctrine, and thus his comparison of the Monroe Doctrine to the Roosevelt Corollary omits a fundamental aspect of America’s colonialist history. Monroe wrote that Spain and... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Untitled

748 words - 3 pages

Imperialism is the domination of a weaker country by a stronger country. For instance Britain dominated India and China in the mid 1880s to the beginning of the 20th century. Imperialism has had both a positive and negative effects on the countries involved. Britain was imperialistic for many reasons, it could dominate because it had the technology and power to do so. They also needed land to acquire raw materials for growing markets.

One country that had imperialism was India. By the mid-1880s, the British East India Company controlled three fifths of India. The cause of British domination was...

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This paper is about Imperialism in India. I had to write it for my AP-World History class after I watched the movie "Gandhi."

714 words - 3 pages

Movie: Gandhi

The movie Gandhi was about the impact Mahatma Gandhi made on India in

gaining its independence from Britain and how the Hindus and Muslims utilized non-violent

protests to achieve this goal. This film reflects imperialism in the sense that what went on in the

video clearly supported the exact definition of the word imperialism. Imperialism is the policy of

extending the rule or influence of a country over another country. Indeed this was the case in

India during the time of Gandhi, this was what he was fighting against.

Gandhi was...

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The Effects of British Imperialism in India

1134 words - 5 pages The Effects of British Imperialism in India One could approach this topic from two points of view; the British and the Indian. One could choose either party and find very different opinions. When British colonizers first arrived in India, they slowly gained more and more control in India through many ways, the most prominent being trade and commerce. At first, they managed India’s government by pulling the string behind the curtain. However, soon they had acquired complete rule over India, converting it into a true British colony. The British considered Indian civilization to be inferior and implemented their western ways overriding ancient Indian customs. Nevertheless, it cannot be denied... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Utopian Solution in The Tempest

2600 words - 10 pages     The entrance of The Tempest into theatres between 1610 and 1611, signifies a possible correlation between Shakespeare's play and the colonization of the ideal New World. Before analyzing the courtly order and utopian theme in The Tempest, it is important to understand the politics and culture of the court in the early 17th century. The society that Shakespeare emerges from plays an important role in the themes portrayed in The Tempest, because it leads to the utopian solution to the political and class conflict.     The definitions of politics and culture have changed drastically since the 17th century in Great Britain. The freedom of Americans to play an active role in politics... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The World at the Beginning of the 20th Century - Imperialism, Capitalism and Socialism. 23/25

1816 words - 7 pages

The world at the beginning of the twentieth century was characterised by tension between tradition and transformation. New ideas about social order were arising that challenged what people had previously believed in and used. Imperialism bought about major conflicts during the early part of the century, and the dominant and accepted values of capitalism were being pushed out of the way for the development of new socialist ideals.

IMPERIALISM

Imperialism is defined by The American Heritage Dictionary of English Language as "The policy of extending a nation's authority by territorial acquisition or by the establishment of economic and political hegemony over other nations."...

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Heart of Darkness

1714 words - 7 pages Post-colonial studies have often created this myth about the European intent for Africa, a tale that has led many westerners to believe in the noble role of European policy of civilizing Africa. However, literal materials have said little about the evils that surrounded the well sometimes ill-disguised motives of explorers, colonial administrators and their adventures. This essay provides an in depth review of Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, a classical novella that illustrates without bias the motives behind human intentions and the extremes individuals can go to achieve wealth and profits at the expense of others with the aim of shedding insight into the rise of European imperialism,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Nationalism: A Catalyst For Expansion

1519 words - 6 pages

Jimmy Chen February 12, 2014

Lee - B Imperialism Essay

Nationalism: A Catalyst For Expansion

The late nineteenth century was marked by the aggrandization of the United States as it expanded externally and involved itself in international affairs. During this time period, the Monroe Doctrine of 1823, which previously fostered neutrality and isolation, was quietly abandoned and eventually replaced with a foreign policy of involvement. The United States adopted imperialism, or the process in which a group of people extends its influence over another territory. Following this policy, the previously neutral country began to actively intervene in the affairs of others. This...

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Geopolitics, Imperialism & the New World War on Iraq.

3180 words - 13 pages

There is much talk today about a "new imperialism" being promoted by financial capital and multinational corporations. To understand this we have to go back for the last few decades, in fact since Second World War where the US assumed out of self interest responsibilities for the welfare of the capitalist system. US and its allies have safeguarded its interest not through conquest but through economic domination. Observers over the decades have called it new form imperialism. A new form of imperialism in which a few nations have taken the responsibilities to save guard their self interest and the interest of...

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World War I: Cause and Effect

852 words - 3 pages "War is the unfolding of miscalculations." - Barbara Tuchman The causes of World War I included a cultivating sense of nationalism leading to an arms race between Europe's paramount powers, all trying to establish superiority above others; militarism inaugurated to predominate across the globe. As the new kids on the block, Germany pursued the same imperialism as nations like France and Britain, with colonies stretching so far and wide that England was dubbed "the Empire on which the sun never sets." The war led to 8.5 million fatalities and the economic effects would be felt for years to come. In the year 1914, World War 1 had erupted and several countries were tangled in the mess,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Rudyard Kipling and "The White Man's Burden".

2196 words - 9 pages

Rudyard Kipling had an extremely substantial influence on the people's views of the United States' and British Imperialistic philosophies through his writing of "The White Man's Burden." During the late 1800's and early 1900's British Imperialism was on the rise, causing many mixed feelings between politicians and citizens as well. As an offspring of England, the United States began to be following in the footsteps of their mother country despite their animosity, slowly becoming a world power with their new...

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African Scramble

944 words - 4 pages

Scramble for Africa, a phrase used to describe the frenzied claiming of African territory by half a dozen European countries that resulted in nearly all of Africa becoming part of Europe's colonial empires. The Scramble began slowly in the 1870s, reached its peak in the late 1880s and 1890s, and tapered off over the first decade of the 20th century. Between 1885 and 1900, European powers were, at times, racing each other to stake claims in Africa. Most Africans resisted being taken over and ruled by foreigners. Thus, much of the latter part of the Scramble involved European armies using modern...

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Hidden Reasons That Started World War I

774 words - 3 pages The American people thought they had captured the idea of “the shot heard around the world” when the first shot was fired in the American Revolution. The idea was then redefined when Gavrilo Princip shot and killed the Archduke, Franz Ferdinand, and his wife. This one shot of violence began a “war to end all wars.” However, what were the hidden reasons that started World War I. How could two small countries petty affairs start a war so large that in the end countries from every civilized continent would take part? Through the different alliances, acts of imperialism, -- the policy of extending the rule or authority of an empire or nation over foreign countries, or of acquiring and holding... VIEW DOCUMENT
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shaping the mprden world

955 words - 4 pages

Shaping the modern world

The way we live now and the way our ancestors lived were completely different. Back in the day there were no such things as phones, the internet or a lot of things that we use every day. All types of things like being able to use electricity, living somewhere other than a farm, drive a car, drink tap water are all thanks to the industrial revolution. There were all sorts of thing happening branching of the industrial revolution. This includes the industrial factor (production, inventions of machines), the transport factor (trains, trucks, cars) and the trade factor (countries exchanging products with other countries). At the same time the industrial...

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The World War one.

1157 words - 5 pages

Brief information of world war one

World War One Essay

War. It has been around for years and has constantly changed the shape of the world. But one question that will still make you wonder is what caused the first world war? Sure the common answer would be the assassination of the Archduke of Austria-Hungary,but how could something so small cause millions of death and be connected to so many different countries? Historians have asked themselves the questions over and over again until four deep causes came to them that made things make a little more sense. Imperialism, militarism, alliances, and nationalism. What are they? What do they mean in this case?

How did...

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Effects of the Industrial Revolution

1319 words - 5 pages The Industrial Revolution that took place throughout the 18th and the 19th centuries had major effects which influenced every aspect of society and life such as, urbanization, imperialism and nationalism. The industrial revolution had an unfathomable effect on shaping the modern world to what it is today. Before the revolution, society revolved around farming and agriculture. There were only two social classes, the nobility and the working class. Little did they know, that their lives were about to change dramatically and continue changing for the next generations to come. Urbanization is the movement of people to city areas. There are many reasons why urbanization occurred on a... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Spanish-American War

1049 words - 4 pages

"You furnish the pictures, and I'll furnish the war!" That quote is one of many that are identified with the Spanish-American War. The Spanish-American War in 1898 was a manipulated war by forces of the New York press, imperialistic supporters and independence-minded humanitarians to achieve its goal of pushing America head long into conflict with Spain and inevitably place America on the world stage of imperialism.

To begin with, we are lead to believe that the United States government didn't want to get involved in the Spanish-American War, but were dragged into it due to the "yellow journalism" prevalent at that time. By 1895, after a previous "Tens Years War" from 1868-1878,...

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Political Culture and the Challenge for Democracy in the United Kingdom

1851 words - 7 pages INTRODUCTION Is it the change in political culture that generates the greatest challenge for democracy in the United Kingdom? That was the question I was asked to answer for this paper and through my research, I have concluded that the political culture provides the greatest challenge for the democracy because it is always changing on the basis of imperialist ideals, the problems with the class system and the changes that Tony Blair made. DEFINITIONS Social cleavages are divisions that can come from religion, ethnic diversity, race, and economic class that in turn interact with the political system. It is measured by how many people are getting along with each other, how people... VIEW DOCUMENT
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An Analysis of Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant"

3918 words - 16 pages "Shooting an Elephant" is one of the most popular of George Orwell's essays. Like his essays "A hanging" and "How the Poor Die", it is chiefly autobiographical. It deals with his experience as a police-officer in Burma. After having completed his education, Orwell joined the Indian Imperial Police, and served in Burma, from 1922 to 1927, as an Assistant Superintendent of Police. His experiences as an officer in Burma were bitter. He was often a victim of the hostility and injustices at the hands of his colleagues and officers. Peter Stansky and William Abrahams in their book The Unknown Orwell write "He was friendless and inexperienced, not certain of what to expect and fearful of proving to... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Britain at the Turn of the Century

745 words - 3 pages Britain at the Turn of the Century Society: Although valuable social reform had taken place during the years leading up to and in the early 20th Century, this period was a time of sharp conflict between employers and workers. Reforms such as National Insurance and Old Age Pensions could not disguise the fact that there had been a rise in the cost of living. Wages fell behind prices, and Britain's industrial supremacy was coming to an end, reflected by an increase in unemployment. Another important social issue at the time was the right for women to vote. In 1897 a Bill to give women women the right to vote had reached a second reading in the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Expansionism Dbq

1254 words - 5 pages United States expansionism in the late nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century is both a continuation and a departure of past United States expansionism. Expansionism in the United States has occurred for many reasons. Power (from land), religion, economics, and the ideas of imperialism and manifest destiny are just a few reasons why the U.S. decided to expand time and again throughout the course of its 231 year history. Expansionism has evolved throughout the years as the inhabitants of the country have progressed both socially (the Second Great Awakening, the women's suffrage movement, the populist party and the early 19th and 20th century social reformers) and economically... VIEW DOCUMENT
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George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant - A Moral Dilemma

1072 words - 4 pages A Moral Dilemma in Orwell's Shooting an Elephant   Unanticipated choices one is forced to make can have long-lasting effects. In "Shooting an Elephant," by George Orwell, the author recounts an event from his life when he was about twenty years old during which he had to choose the lesser of two evils. Many years later, the episode seems to still haunt him. The story takes place at some time during the five unhappy years Orwell spends as a British police officer in Burma. He detests his situation in life, and when he is faced with a moral dilemma, a valuable work animal has to die to save his pride.   Orwell is an unhappy young policeman who lives in mental... VIEW DOCUMENT
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America's Transition from a Regional to a World Power

755 words - 3 pages America's Transition from a Regional to a World Power Between the years 1875 through 1920 the United States of America was able to secure itself as a major world power. This was easy to do after the Industrial Revolution and the Progressive movement because the two most important qualities needed to be able to accomplish moving from a regional to a world power existed during this time period: an economic need of resources and mass production using technology, especially with transportation. Ideology and culture also played important roles in America’s rise to power. As industrialist Andrew Carnegie describes, “The old nations of the earth creep on at a snail’s pace [but the United... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Colonialism and Dependence

5986 words - 24 pages Colonialism and Dependence In "Imperialism, the Highest State of Capitalism", Lenin warned, in refuting Kautsky, that the domination of finance capital not only does not lessen the inequalities and contradictions present in the world economy, but on the contrary accentuates them. Time has passed and proven him right. The inequalities have become sharper. Historical research has shown that the distance that separated the standard of living in the wealthy countries from that of the poor countries toward the middle of the nineteenth century was much smaller than the distance that separates them today. The gap has widened. In 1850 the per capita income in the industrialized... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

1537 words - 6 pages Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell Few supervisors experience lack of respect and denunciation from workers because of their positions in a company. Supervisors take actions to preserve the image of authority before subordinates and from being ridiculed by their workers, even if the supervisors object these types of actions. The essay "Shooting an Elephant" relates to this situation. The author of this essay is George Orwell. The author talks about his work and personal experience that emphasizes the impact of imperialism at the sociological and psychological stage. This paper shall discuss the Orwell's essay, how the artistic choices shape the facts in the essay, how the relationship... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The English Patient

1271 words - 5 pages

The novel, The English Patient, by Michael Ondaajte constructs meaning through the use of tropes, images and symbolism, instead of merely portraying a linear set of events. There are many references within the text and tropes of covering, which serve to create and strengthen meaning. Bold imagery is also present, which erects another level of significance. Symbolism plays a vital role in the formation of meaning,...

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Cinema as Intertext in Midnight’s Children

1687 words - 7 pages Cinema as Intertext in Midnight’s Children Saleem in Midnight’s Children makes an accurate evaluation of India when he states, “Nobody from Bombay should be without a basic film vocabulary” (Rushdie 33). Bollywood, the capital of the film industry in India, is the largest manufacturer of motion pictures in the world. A large percentage of the films are either mythical romances or musicals and often they last longer than three hours in length. While watching Indian cinema would be a painful ordeal for Western audiences, Indians embrace the industry and are very proud of their cinema heritage. Indians would argue that it is the distinct differences in Bollywood filmmaking that... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Being the Meat in the Sandwich: Implications of the double colonisation of empire and patriarchy by the female characters in Wide Sargasso Sea

2499 words - 10 pages One of the many ways that postcolonial literature accomplishes the task of challenging the hegemony of western imperialism is through the use of a ‘canonical counter-discourse,’ a strategy whereby ‘a post-colonial writer takes up a character or characters, or the basic assumptions of a canonical text [where a colonialist discourse is developed directly or indirectly], and unveils [its colonialist] assumptions, subverting the text for post-colonial purposes’. (Tiffin, 1987) Such a revolutionary literary project is evidently realised in Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys, a prequel that ‘writes back the centre’ of Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre (1847). Rhys is categorical about her conscious... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Causes and Us involvement in World War I

2145 words - 9 pages

Outline

I. Introduction

A. Quote

B. Question: What events caused the world to go to war? Why did the United States become involved?

II. Body

A. Nationalism and Imperialism

B. Assassination of Archduke Francis Ferdinand

C. The United States and the War

1. Neutrality

2. Trade

3. U-boats

III. Conclusion

A. Mention most important points

B. Answer question

IV. Bibliography

Introduction

On the day of April 2, 1917 President Woodrow Wilson went before Congress asking for a declaration of war.

It is a fearful thing...

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The Mock-Epic and The Rape Of The Lock

1116 words - 4 pages The Mock-Epic and The Rape Of The Lock The argument can be made that the purpose of the Rape of the Lock is to attack the vanity of women. Pope states this directly in his dedication to Arabella – “to laugh at their sex’s little unguarded Follies,” and the author’s use of the mock-epic seems to reinforce this purpose through its comparison of the epic odyssey to trivial events. In this comparison there can also be found a description of the relationship between the sexes not as a mutual co-existence but rather as a war with both sexes constantly striving for supremacy. If this is true, then we must condemn the society in which Pope lived rather than female vanity. I will look at... VIEW DOCUMENT