Organism Physiology Essay Examples

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Role of Biology in Life Essay

890 words - 4 pages Role of biology in lifeOur blue planet is the one where life exists. So when we mention "bio" we talk about life on earth. Hence we can say that biology is the study of living organisms. The fact that it is the study of animals and plants makes sense that it would affect a person's daily life. In fact, everything about biology affects our daily life. Biology is a "natural science of organisms, including their structure, function, growth, evolution, distribution VIEW DOCUMENT
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Ivan Pavlov: Digestion and Conditioning. Essay

1374 words - 5 pages in charge of the new laboratory for animal testing. Pavlov first began researching blood pressure and the innervations of the heart in 1876. He discovered that blood pressure remained constant in spite of significant changes in blood volume stimulated by fasting, feeding, or watering the organism (Gray, 1979). Although these findings left no long-term impression on the field of physiology, the experiments did allow Pavlov to perfect his research methods.Pavlov did not approve of the then-popular acute experiments, in which the animal was anesthetized, the organ of interest separated and examined as quickly as possible, and the animal killed. Pavlov was a strongly believed that all VIEW DOCUMENT
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This is a science lesson plan on eukaryotic cells for all of you soon to be teachers. It is using The Madeline Hunter Model for lesson planning.

514 words - 2 pages structure and function. Important levels of organization from structure and function include cells, organs, tissues, organ systems, whole organisms, and ecosystems.LS1c. Cells carry on the many functions needed to sustain life. They grow and divide, thereby producing more cells. This requires that they take in nutrients, which they use to provide energy for work that cells do and to make the materials that a cell or an organism needs.LS3a. All organisms must be able to obtain and use resources, grow, reproduce, and maintain stable internal conditions while living in a constantly changing external environment.LS5a.Millions of species of animals, plants, and microorganisms are VIEW DOCUMENT
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A Scientific Explanation of Stem Cells and Stem Cell Research

562 words - 2 pages In general, a cell can be defined as a stem cell if two basic criteria are met. First, stem cell is capable of self renewal for indefinite period throughout life while maintaining undifferentiated state, i.e., the cell can divide and produce two identical daughter cells and thereby maintains the stem cell pool. Second, stem cell possesses capacity for differentiate into specialised and functional progeny under the right conditions, or given the right signals. It may divide asymmetrically to yield an identical cell and a daughter cell that acquires a particular cell type’s properties, such as morphology, phenotype and functional physiology that classified it belongs to a particular tissue VIEW DOCUMENT
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Investigation of Tissues Essay

1171 words - 5 pages Investigation of Tissues Tissues are defined as a group of associated, similarly structured cells that with their ground substance act together in the performance of a specialised function for the survival of the multicellular organism. The tissues are classified into four main groups which are epithelial, connective, muscle and nervous. (http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia accessed 08 October 2004) Epithelial Tissues Epithelial tissues form the covering of all body surfaces with the functions being to provide protective covering, absorption, secretion, diffusion, sensation and contractility. They are tightly packed together with little VIEW DOCUMENT
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Ludwig Von Beethoven Essay

974 words - 4 pages theory presented in the early 1930s “…was to transcend the dichotomies of a mechanistic vs. a vitalistic explanation of life through consideration of the organism as an open system endowed with specific properties capable of scientific investigation. Together with the related concepts of levels of organization and of the active as opposed to the passive (or reactive) organism, it constituted an early statement of a holistic theory of life and nature”. (LUDWIG VON Bertalanffy) His views were rejected by other biological theorists who used chemical and physical laws on subcellular levels to elucidate the development and progression of life. Ludwig’s aim was VIEW DOCUMENT
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Genetic Engineering Essay

965 words - 4 pages permanent....Genetic engineers cannot fully and reliably predict the biological effects of these alterations. They cannot adequately predict how these manipulations will influence cellular functioning, the physiology and behavior of the organism as a whole, and the ecosystem into which that genetically engineered organism will be introduced. It is impossible to confidently predict the effects of genetic manipulations because of the complexity and interconnectedness of living systems. (Fagan 1) We do have to be careful so herbicide resistance genes do not get transferred to weeds; or "super weeds" might be created which cannot be killed with traditional methods. We also have to make sure VIEW DOCUMENT
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Chimera Essay

945 words - 4 pages Rethinking humanity Chimera is a term not many people have heard of before. Some may know it but confuse it with hybrids. A chimera is single organism, usually an animal but can be human as well, which is composed by at least two different sets of DNA. It can also be a fusion of many different zygotes (fertilised eggs). Chimeras are formed by at least four parent cells; two fertilised eggs or embryos fused together. The individual cells keep its own character. This resolves in an organism with different tissues. It is often animals experiments are done on but it can also occur naturally. In “I, chimera” from BBC Focus 2007 they describe how that can happen. According to Henry Nicholls, an VIEW DOCUMENT
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Photosynthesis and Respiration Essay

638 words - 3 pages in the organism to provide them with an energy source.Part II.Q. 1 Autotrophs; the names given to the organisms that can produce glucose by way of photosynthesis. Phototrophs and chemoautotrophs are the subdivision of autotrophs. Autotrophs can synthesize molecules they require for life using inorganic compounds and an external energy source (www.enotes.com). Three different types of autotrophs are 1) plants 2) algae and 3) archaea, which can be classified as Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota and Korarchaeota.Q. 2 Aerobic organism; the name given to organisms that break down glucose, also VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Development of Gene Manipulation Essay

1617 words - 6 pages A rapidly changing healthcare industry requires researchers to explore various possibilities in the attempt to develop effective treatment options. The human genome is a complex organism that is vulnerable to invading pathogens and environmental changes. Advancements in human health directly require treatment of the human body on a cellular level. Rigorous examination and experimentation of microorganisms revealed encouraging scientific discoveries. An efficient mechanism promising vast improvements to healthcare is the development of gene manipulation. Genetic engineering, also called genetic modification, is the direct manipulation of an organism's genome by using biotechnologies. The VIEW DOCUMENT
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Animal Experimentation is Necessary

1607 words - 6 pages physiology, give students the opportunity to observe the effects of some commonly used drugs, and to provide students with a "hands-on" experience working with live patients.  Students are given the option of not participating, but are still responsible for learning the material presented in the lab.  This year, thirty students (out of one hundred and thirty-two) opted to skip the lab, which prompts the question: Why not more?        The argument used by the Washington Post that the labs are cruel to the dogs, because of the "questionable" source of the animals, is completely unsubstantiated.  The Daily was very upset to learn that the universtiy obtains its dogs from C.C. Baird, a class VIEW DOCUMENT
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Animal Rights

1139 words - 5 pages years afterward, the tobacco industry was able to use these studies to delay government warnings and to discourage physicians from intervening in their patients' smoking habits. We all know now that this is totally untrue and that smoking is a large contributor to cancer. It turns out that cancer research is especially sensitive to differences in physiology between humans and other animals. Many animals, particularly rats and mice, synthesize within their bodies approximately 100 times the recommended daily allowance for humans of vitamin C, which is believed to help the body ward off cancer. The stress of handling, confinement and isolation alters the animal's mental stability and VIEW DOCUMENT
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Bones: The Elixir of Life

1464 words - 6 pages At a glance the skeletal system can seem misleadingly simple but in essence forms a complex component of many of the bodies systems; its functionality being integral to optimal body performance. Thus, the mental and physical state of a person, being determined by the systems making up the organism is also determined by the functionality of bones. I define a person as being constituted of an interdependent physical and mental state; hence bones influence a person's identity. It is worthwhile noting, however, that the skeletal system of an organism is not restricted to playing a role in the organism from which it is derived - components of it can also utilised in another organism. This can VIEW DOCUMENT
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Expression of Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) in the Amphibious Mud Eel (Monopterus cuchia) Under Hyper-Ammonia Stress

996 words - 4 pages All organisms are adapted to life within a constrained environmental envelope, with cosequent specializations in ecology, physiology and biochemistry. Associated with these adaptations is a species-specific capacity to cope with environmental changes. If an organism is taken outside of its “normal” environmental envelope, for example, by changing temperature, salinity or oxygen availability, the organism become vulnerable, a situation generically described as stress. In turn, this environmental challenge tiggers a biochemical response, the aim of which is to counteract or mitigate any potential cell damage caused by the environmental insult and to enhance survival. Fish, like other VIEW DOCUMENT
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A race for the double helix

1181 words - 5 pages bacteria. He concluded that type III-S transformed into type II-R. This experiment showed that traits could be transferred from one organism to another. it was one of the first experiments to suggest that DNA was the genetic code because heat denatures protein, thus ruling out the possibility of protein being the genetic code. At this time, DNA was still poorly understood and people were skeptical so Griffith was not recognized for his discovery. In 1940, a bacteriologist and geneticist from Owosso, Michigan by the name of Alfred Hershey made significant strides in his work with bacteriophages. He observed that when two different bacteriophages have infected the same bacteria, the two VIEW DOCUMENT
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Osmoregulation in Fish

824 words - 3 pages Osmoregulation Field Assignment Osmoregulation is the process in which an organism balances the uptake and loss of water and solutes, on a cellular level, in an attempt to maintain homeostasis (Campbell and Reece, 2009). In osmoregulation, the regulation of osmotic pressure is the way in which organisms prevent their fluid from becoming to concentrated or diluted. The osmotic pressure, generated by the net movement of water across a selectively permeable membrane, driven by differences in solute concentrations on each side of the membrane, is critical in the maintenance of homeostasis. During osmosis, water flows from the solution with the lower concentration of solute to the higher VIEW DOCUMENT
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Personal statement

713 words - 3 pages inside a cell, and I chose Biomedical Research in order to understand how the cells work so coordinately to accomplish all the body functions. I dreamed of being able to understand DNA mutations that lead to disease but my first lab experience gave me a lot of knowledge and quite a lot of new doubts that science has not been able to clarify. My research Interests are mainly focused on cellular and molecular biology. I am very interested in how gene expression is regulated among all different cells in an organism. Epigenetic is one of my preferred topics I really enjoy read and understand epigenetics mechanisms that orchestrate the great concert of gene expression. I would love to have the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Structure of DNA

903 words - 4 pages pair then moves to the equator. Next, the members of each original pair and the pairs duplicates move to the opposite poles and the cell divides. Each of the two daughter cells receives one member of each original pair of chromosomes and its duplicate. These two new cells divide immediately. This time the chromosomes do not duplicate themselves. Instead, one of each kind goes to each new daughter cell. Thus the two divisions of meiosis produce four sex cells. Each cell contains half the number of chromosomes found in all the other cells of an organism.ReferenceN. Campbell, J. Reece & E. Simon. (2007) Essential Biology with Physiology. PearsonEducation Inc. VIEW DOCUMENT
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This is about the early perspectives of psychology

739 words - 3 pages The study of the way people think and behave is called psychology. The field of psychology has a number of sub-disciplines devoted to the study of the different levels and contexts of human thought and behavior. In early psychology, the different perspectives are functionalism, Gestalt, behavioral, psychodynamic, humanistic, physiological, evolutionary, cognitive, and cultural and diversity.The structuralism approach, which according to the textbook is the earliest approach in modern psychology, attempts to identify the basic elements and structure of conscious experience. Wundt believed that the essence of all total adjustments of the organism was a psychophysical process, an VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Fittest One Must Survive

965 words - 4 pages Over the course of time, animal testing has served as an implement to enhance the life quality of humans. Even the great medic Galen of Pergamon used animals for research which made him become the father of vivisection. According to the article “Should Vivisection be abolished” by Bayard Webster, vivisection “is a surgery on a living organism for experimental purposes.” Furthermore, Niccolo Machiavelli once said, “The end justifies the means.” It is a modest way to express how science has developed because of the use of animals in scientific research. Nowadays, some people have started a revolt to stop the usage of living beings on medical research. Nevertheless, animal rights activists VIEW DOCUMENT
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Classical COnditioning

1292 words - 5 pages Ivan Pavlov and Classical Conditioning 1904 Nobel Prize Winner, Ivan Pavlov was born in Ryazan, Russia on September 14, 1849. Pavlov is best known for his intricate workings with the drooling dog experiment that lead to his further research in conditioning. This experiment, which began in 1889, had an influence on the development of physiologically oriented behaviorist theories of psychology in the early years of the nineteenth century. His work on the physiology of the digestive glands won him the 1904 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. CONTRIBUTIONS Pavlov's first independent work focused on the physiology of the circulation of the blood (Girogian, 1974). He studied the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Revealing Metabolic Phenotypes in Plant

1631 words - 7 pages Introduction Metabolomics is the ‘omics’ science of metabolism and its definition is in analogy with other part of biological science genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics. The metabolome or study of metabolites covers all the compounds formed in a biological system, from an organelle to a whole organism. Also, metabolome can be explained as the entire set of small molecules (non-polymeric compounds with a molecular weight less than ~1000Da) that are found in general metabolic reactions as byproduct and that are biosynthesized by a vital system like cell, tissue or organism. (Harrigan GG. 2003). Metabolites are undergone by dynamic changes because they are sensitive to genetic or VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Function of Pharmacokinetics

1057 words - 4 pages conditions of the body2. Clearance and volume of distribution would be expected to vary with changes in plasma protein binding. The usage of in vitro setting could help us to measure these modifiable elements. Although plasma concentration measurements are usually easiest to perform via in vitro settings, clarification of parameters in original organism or the human body terms requires blood cell cultures, so the relevant plasma concentration of the drug partition parameter should be determined1. This major pharmacokinetic input parameter is determinant of the extent of availability as the other parameters being ignored on these in vitro settings. The in vitro setting can help us to VIEW DOCUMENT
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Resistance of M. Tuberculosis

2005 words - 8 pages Introduction Tuberculosis infects over 8 million people per year. Nearly 2 million people die each year from complications due to being plagued with the organism that causes tuberculosis1. Tuberculosis is the second most common cause of death worldwide from an infectious agent1. While incidence numbers are slowly declining with regards to tuberculosis, new barriers to effective treatment are presenting themselves. One such challenge is the emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extremely drug-resistant (XDR) forms of the disease. These facts underscore the importance of uncovering new preventative measures and treatments for tuberculosis. This paper will give an overview of the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Marine Ecosystem

1623 words - 6 pages ://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nekton" title="Nekton">Nekton is bigger organisms such as fish, whales, and turtles, and benthos are bottom dwellers. As per the first law of thermo dynamics:"An organism may absorb energy from its surroundings, or it may give up some energy into its surroundings, but the total energy content of the organism and its surroundings is always the same. An organism can't create the energy it requires to live. Instead, it must capture energy from the environment to use for biological work, a process involving the transformation of energy from one form to another."What this means in the marine ecosystem is that whether the organism is a Plankton, Nekton VIEW DOCUMENT
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Risk of Plastics

2230 words - 9 pages adverse effects on human health, even at low concentrations? Studies involving various animals seem to indicate that there may be a scientific basis on proving the risks of BPA on the physiology of several animals. Bear in mind, however, that these studies only provide an argument towards the biological significance of BPA. They do not give any factual correlation between human health and BPA. The studies may infer towards the potential risk on humans, but to infer a specific conclusion, given the data on a different species, would be inappropriate. Studies done on animals can only infer conclusions based on the animal observed and cannot be extrapolated to any other species. Two VIEW DOCUMENT
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Restorative and Enhancement Cyborgs in Modern Medicine

1673 words - 7 pages they would be unable to hear or if one lost or broke their glasses they would be unable to see. As a result, to lesson the burden on the user, as technology has become more advanced so have these devices. The simple machines being used before have become more complex, efficient, smaller, and were able to implanted into the body. This allowed the complete integration of machine and human as one, creating the medical cyborg. Cyborg is short for the term ‘cybernetic organism’ and was first coined by Clynes and Klein in “Cyborgs and Space” a paper on space travel and humans. Cybernetics is the study of feedback in human physiology and the possible replacement of these systems by electrical and VIEW DOCUMENT
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Water in the Biochemical Process

1665 words - 7 pages , so water molecule has no overall charge (Brooker et al., 2007). As water is a polar molecule, it is an excellent transport medium, since it can dissolve and interact with a wide range of “polar and charged molecules” (Gerstein & Levitt, 1998), such as, water in the interstitial fluid, dissolves oxygen and carbon dioxide in blood, to be transported around the organism. Furthermore, as CO2 concentration builds up, water combines with the dissolved carbon dioxide, catalysed by carbonic anhydrase, to form H2CO3. This dissociates to form H+ and HCO3 - , which acts as buffer in blood plasma, keeping the pH constant for efficient enzyme activity. The dissociation occurs, because water has a VIEW DOCUMENT
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Our mother we call Nature

1759 words - 7 pages complex working organism. We all work together to survive and we need each other to do that. Gaia provides conditions that are suitable for a perfect planet. For example, Gaia regulates the ocean, atmosphere, and temperature. A scientist named James Lovelock formed this idea in the 1970s. The Gaia Theory is used in many different topics of science that scientist question all the time like ecology, climate science, and physiology. Lovelock describes the Earth as abiotic where evolution and its environment affect each other. All of these aspects of Gaia will be based on my views on nature, how we affect the Earth, and how much of an influence we are. We do not realize that nature is VIEW DOCUMENT
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Gaining Control of the Gene Responsible for Apoptosis

1199 words - 5 pages called apoptosis. This in-built program of cell suicide prevents cancer by eliminating cells with damaged genes (Cotran 18). Similarly, our bodies replace cells with a new type of cell when a change is needed, such as during embryonic development (Cotran 18). To illustrate this point, we look at one of Dr. Adamchak’s “stories of physiology,” as taught from Martini, when a bone is being formed cartilage cells, or condrocytes, come into an area to build a cartilage model of the bone. Once this model of bone is complete, the cartilage cells are given the command to die. Osteoblasts, or bone building cells, move in to the space formerly occupied by the Condrocytes, and replace the cartilage matrix VIEW DOCUMENT
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Pathogens And The Spread Of Disease

2681 words - 11 pages what role pathogens play in the advance of it. 2.0 What is a pathogen ? Diseases in all humans, plants and other organisms are caused by micro-organisms called pathogens; these can be micro-organisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, helminths and protozoa (Inglis,1996). The term pathogen is most commonly used to describe an infectious organism which interrupts the usual physiology of a multi-cellular animal or plant (Wassenaar, 2009). There are many pathogens which have been responsible for massive outbreaks of disease, an example of this is Yersinia Pestis which was the bacteria responsible for the black plague (Harwood 1979). Yersinia Pestis is an extracellular pathogen VIEW DOCUMENT
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ESSAY

2438 words - 10 pages Introduction Cells are the basic units of life and their processes are vital to the functioning of all organism. The reactions of photosynthesis and cellular respiration are complimentary and are also the most important pathways on the Earth. Photosynthesis is a process that converts carbon dioxide into organic compounds in presence of sunlight. Cellular respiration is the set of metabolic reactions that take in cells of living organisms that convert nutrients like sugar into energy , which is known as ATP (adenosine triphosphate), and waste products. The two processes are closely related and likewise, they share many similarities and differences Processes in a Nutshell The main VIEW DOCUMENT
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Soil and Seed Sterilization Effects on Dwarf Pea Plants

1515 words - 6 pages The growth of dwarf peas, Pisum sativum depends on the characteristics of the soil and the seeds. Sterile conditions will have a positive effect on P. sativum below and above ground physiology. The plants’ root length, root width and number of leaves will be positively affected by sterile conditions because the pathogens in soil which out compete the plants for its nutrients will be killed off. Soil and some seeds were sterilized and grown for twenty one days before root length, root width, and number of leaf parameters was tested. From the three parameters, root length was the only one affected by sterile conditions. No changes were observed in the other parameters because more growth VIEW DOCUMENT
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Psychology

1529 words - 6 pages Psychology is the investigation of the mind and how it processes and directs our thoughts, actions and conceptions. However, in 1879 Wilhelm Wundt opened the first psychology laboratory at the University of Leipzig in Germany. Nevertheless, the origins of psychology go all the way back thousands of years starting with the early Greeks. This foundation is closely connected to biology and philosophy; and especially the subfields of physiology which is the study of the roles of living things and epistemology, which is the study of comprehension and how we understand what we have learned. The connection to physiology and epistemology is often viewed as psychology, which is the hybrid offspring VIEW DOCUMENT
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This Essay is based on detailed facts on Cancer.

1075 words - 4 pages , mating can't occur unless certain genes are silenced. But there are also mechanisms, both normal and abnormal, that allow the process to be reversed."Some of the key genetic components of this silencing pathway in yeast are virtually identical to those in humans, which allows scientists to exploit the power of yeast genetics to study complex human processes. Therefore, yeast is an ideal system in which to look for anti-silencing - and anti-cancer - drugs. (The world learned of the significance of yeast as a model organism this fall when Hutchinson Center President and Director Lee Hartwell, Ph.D., was awarded the 2001 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. His groundbreaking use of VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Potential of Genetically Modified Foods

2470 words - 10 pages Technology thrives today. It is omnipresent, to the point where it has become almost unnoticeable. There is technology in communication, in transport, in design, and in advertising. At a glance, food does not seem to be a place for technology. For centuries, people have gradually mastered the intricate science of breeding to produce the best foods possible. But now, a new and radically different way to modify foods has arisen. It is much faster than traditional breeding, and it promises to create unimaginable species from which humankind can greatly benefit. It is genetic engineering. Genetic engineering modifies a specific gene or set of genes of an organism to change it VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Problem of Dehydration

1259 words - 5 pages In many ways, any living being is the product of water. The figures are relevant for this assumption: the human body contains 60% water. A newborn has at birth 64% water in his organism while the fetus in the third month of pregnancy has in his tissues, 91% water. As a man ages he starts to dry: around the age of 70, the body contains 46% water. The body is composed of 25% solids and 75% liquid material in which the solvent is water. Furthermore, even the brain tissue is composed of 85% water (Wedro, Conrad Stöppler, 2011). The role of water in ensuring the health of the human body is essential. Without water, humans cannot live. Water metabolism disorders produce signals that indicate a VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Homeostasis Concept -What is meant by this term, examples of how mechanisms achieve homeostasis, negative and positive feedback.

945 words - 4 pages Improvement suggestions: history of homeostasis? Further consideration of positive feedback, e.g. in pathological conditions.The Homeostasis ConceptHomeostasis is a system of automatic control mechanisms which maintain the internal environment of an organism despite changes in the external environment (Campbell & Reece, 2005). The internal environment consists of extracellular fluids that bathe every cell of the body, supplying nutrients and receiving wastes (Purves et al., 2001). Regulators (animals which use homeostasis), maintain suitable physical conditions such as body temperature and water potential of cells, and the supply of nutrients e.g. O" and glucose, and VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Gaia Hypothesis

2665 words - 11 pages The Gaia Hypothesis The Gaia Hypothesis is a hypothesis that was developed by James Lovelock and Lynn Margulis in the late 1970's. James Lovelock is a British scientist, an atmospheric chemist, and also an inventor with an education in human physiology. Lynn Margulis was a microbiologist during the 1970's at Boston University. She also originated the theory of the eukaryotic cell arising as a result of endosymbiotic cell capture. This theory is the one that gave her the credibility to advance the Gaia Hypothesis. Since every hypothesis takes the form of an if/then statement, the Gaia Hypothesis namely is an if/then statement. Summarized the Gaia Hypothesis is "If life regulates VIEW DOCUMENT
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W3 Assignment 1 Discussion

871 words - 3 pages Eukaryotic cells are the most structurally advanced of the major cell types. Describe the structure and function of each of the eukaryotic organelles. Distinguish between those that are and are not membranous. Most are membranous. Eukaryotic cells, whether from animals, plants, protists, or fungi, are the most structurally advanced of the major cell types. Eukaryote are single-celled or multicellular organism whose cells contain nucleus and any other structures (organelles) enclosed within the membrane that perform specific functions. The surface of the cell is covered with a thin film or plasma membrane, which is the boundary that separates the living cell from its nonliving VIEW DOCUMENT
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Biological Classification: Linnaeus System

953 words - 4 pages (Pierce, 2007). The five kingdoms are further subdivided in to other diverse and exclusive groups. The following is the hierarchical sequence of classification: the kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, and the species. The Systematics or taxonomy is the art of classifying living things according to their similarity in characteristics. It is developed using the basic factors of genetics, physiology, morphology and ecological characteristics (Altran, 1990). The process of classifying living creatures starts with knowledge resolution in an orderly manner (Rudwick, 1985). This involves giving names, offering descriptions and arranging all living things according to classes. The VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Helicobacter Pylori's Way of Life

913 words - 4 pages characterized that this organism produces the enzymes catalase and urease. Both catalase and urease helps with the bacterium’s pathogenicity. Urease enzyme is considered the main virulence factor of H. pylori. It breaks down urea, which then produces ammonia that protects the bacterium from the acid in the stomach3. Ammonia presents as a buffer that neutralizes stomach acid, helping H. pylori to thrive2. As well, catalase enhances its ability to overcome the white blood cells that tries to kill the bacteria1. H. pylori produces two more enzymes right after it colonizes the stomach. Protease and phospholipase are enzymes that act on gastric epithelium to destroy the mucus layer of the VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Role of Medical Anthropology

982 words - 4 pages in any clinical setting. In many scientific disciplines researches try to explain their objects by reducing them to become principles, however in anthropology ,the approach is to understand issues in their context meaning that practises ideas are looked at from a wider perspective. Significance of Human Body to medical anthropologists. We cannot talk about health, without focusing on the body because ill health presents suffering to the human body and the mind. To the medical anthropologists, the human body is more than just a physical organism; it is also a focus of a set of beliefs about its social and psychological significance about its inner structure referred to as anatomy and VIEW DOCUMENT
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Ecosystem Succession Paper

707 words - 3 pages ://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biotic_component" title="Biotic component">Biotic Components are all the living beings in an environment, from protists to mammalians. Individuals should have specific behavioral and physiological characteristics that permit their survival and reproduction in a defined environment. The condition of sharing an environment generates a competence among the species, competence that is given for food, space, etc. We can say that the survival of an organism in a given environment is limited so by the abiotic factors as by the biotic factors of that environment.Last but not least, there are many mechanisms in the environment that can hinder the recovery process of an VIEW DOCUMENT
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How to make a human

687 words - 3 pages “How to Make a Human” Revision1.Getting Pregnant (or not?)Humans are multicellular organismsCell theory:Cell Theory refers to the idea that cells are the basic unit of structure in every living thing. new cells are formed from other existing cells and the cell is a fundamental unit of structure, physiology, and organization in all living organisms.Modern Cell TheoryThe generally accepted parts of modern cell theory include:1.The cell is the fundamental unit of structure and function in living things.2.All cells come from pre-existing cells by division.3.Energy flow (metabolism and biochemistry) occurs within cells.4.Cells contain hereditary VIEW DOCUMENT
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Why Should We Continue With Immunisation?

714 words - 3 pages protective measures, these can be reduced to two categories: non-specific defence mechanisms and specific defence mechanisms; non-specific defence mechanisms are the first barriers to invaders, the front line of defence, as their name suggests these mechanisms are generic, fighting off anything and everything. Specific defence mechanisms are cells that have memory; once they have fought off an invading organism, the varicella zoster virus (VZV) for example, the virus responsible for chicken pox, they will remember it and should the virus attack again, even decades later, the cells will know exactly how to destroy it and will do so before the virus can get a foothold. Non-Specific Defence VIEW DOCUMENT
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stevia

688 words - 3 pages was too small and inadequate and also the study period was too short for the stevia to show in a significant manner. Sclafani et al. (2010) examined stevia and saccharine preferences in rats and mice. They used female Sprague Dawley rats and several mice strains in their experiment. The major finding of this research was that stevia was unable to replace saccharin as a sugar substitute for experimental purposes. The problem with this approach was that the artificial setting of the experiment may unable to be a substitute in a real world setting. Figlewicz et al. (2009) researched about the effect of moderate intake of sweeteners on metabolic health in the rat physiology and behaviour. The VIEW DOCUMENT
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Nobel Prize Essay

3751 words - 15 pages In 2013, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to James Rothman, Randy Schekman, and Thomas Sudhof for their pioneering research in cell signaling pathways. Together, they were able to solve many questions that we had about how this precise cell-­‐to-­‐ cell regulation is carried out. With their works, many scientists across the world can apply their discoveries in various ways. Due to our profound genomic studies, we have been able to sequence many genomes VIEW DOCUMENT
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Continuous Emotional Response to the Audio, Visual, and Audiovisual Channels

1714 words - 7 pages -only, video-only-or audiovisual) is more significant in determining negative valence? Measurements of Emotion Responses There are three general ways of measurements of emotional experience: behavior, self-report, and physiology. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. Self- report can measure a person’s conscious experience of emotional states. It shares the advantage of easy, cheap, and quick way of measure emotional experience compared to physiological and behavioral measurements (Parrott & Hertel, 1999; Poels & Dewitte, 2006). Most media effect researches provide the outcome of media exposure rather than audiences’ emotional experience during media exposure. It is VIEW DOCUMENT
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Genetic Engineering

2142 words - 9 pages ">James Dewey Watson, were credited with the discovery of DNA. Later they were presented the Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine in 1962. (Lewin 1) DNA is also known as deoxyribonucleic acid and it carries a living organism's genetic code. The discovery of DNA was the very beginning of genetic engineering. Today the science of biotechnology has evolved to a much higher level, but is still many steps away from completely correcting damaged or diseased genes. The reason is partly to blame on the ignorance of society, because it believes that genetic engineering is wrong. The part of genetic engineering that is VIEW DOCUMENT