Spiritual Needs Assessment Essay Examples

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Providing Culturally Competent Care Essay

998 words - 4 pages The National Center for Cultural Competence developed a validated assessment tool “at the request of the Bureau of Primary Health Care (BPHC), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Service (DHHS)” (National Center for Cultural Competence (NCCC), 2004). The intent of the assessment tool is to “to enhance the delivery of high quality services to culturally and linguistically diverse individuals and underserved communities” (NCCC, para. 1, 2004). The tool is intended to take 20 minutes to complete, is confidential and is available only online. Upon completion of the survey a profile of the practitioner’s “Values & Belief Systems Subscale... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Transcendentalism Today by Kurt Kawohl Essay

979 words - 4 pages

Transcendentalism Today

Transcendentalism today can influence the beginning of a new realization in many religions. The term Transcendentalism was derived from the philosopher Kant, who called "all knowledge transcendental which is concerned not with objects but with our mode of knowing objects." In the words of Ralph Waldo Emerson, "We will walk on our own feet; we will work with our own hands; we will speak our own minds...A nation of men will for the first time exist, because each believes himself...

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Christian Counseling Ethics Essay

1947 words - 8 pages Summarize the five ethical guidelines for integrating spirituality into counseling. Discuss the ethical concerns that each guideline is attempting to address. According to Craig Cashwell and J. Young (2011) one of the five ethical guidelines are (1) Religion and spirituality are widely practiced in the United States - “researchers have found that 96% of people leaving in the United States believe in a higher power, more than 90% pray, 69% are members of a religious community” (p. 13). Furthermore, on 7.5% of the United States population identify themselves as non-religious. However, many people engage in a form of spiritual practice that may not include a higher power or does not involve... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Native American Spiritual Beliefs Essay

2505 words - 10 pages I have decided to discuss the topic of Spirituality in Native Americans. To address this topic, I will first discuss what knowledge I have gained about Native Americans. Then I will discuss how this knowledge will inform my practice with Native Americans. To conclude, I will talk about ethical issues, and dilemmas that a Social Worker might face working with Native American people. In approaching this topic, I first realized that I need to look up some general information about Native Americans in the United States. According to the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), there are approximately 564 federally recognized tribes in the United States today (Who we... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Spiritual Battle Against Spirits in The Air.

2411 words - 10 pages Spiritual Battle against Spirits in the Air. There are many events that happen in this world; the Bible explained that what Happened is related to the spiritual world. In this paper, let us try to understand the meaning Of spiritual warfare. Almost everyone believes may already know that there is a spiritual battle between us and the evil Spirits. This truth is clearly taught in the Bible. Paul stated that our battle is not against flesh and blood but evil spirits (Ephesians 6:12). James advises its Recipients to resist the devil (James 4:7) and Peter warned that the devil walking around About to swallow someone to devour (1 Peter 5:8). (Hickey) Some texts imply that believers... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Faith and Spirituality Essay

1575 words - 6 pages

RLST 1107 EL10

Essay

Done By: Sydney Paluzzi - 233310

Due Date: March 18th, 2011

Quantities of people around the world do not follow organized religions however pursue spirituality. "Spirituality refers to the unique and intense experience of a reality greater than oneself or an experience of connection with the totality of things". (Bailey, 23) An individual does not have to be religious in order to have a spiritual experience. The benefits of spirituality include humbleness, inner strength and peace, hope, sense of meaning and purpose in life, healing, acceptance of self and others, sense of...

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Health Care in the Buddha, Sikh and Baha’i Faiths

1570 words - 6 pages Introduction The understanding of health and the process of healing in regard to the religious belief of individuals goes beyond the realm of spirituality (Suzanne, 2008). Health is believed by every religion as the most important value at which insights can be created, and as well a practical means at which the health of individuals can be promoted. The secular perspective of religion is considered a contributing factor which broadens the unique religious contribution and individual’s concern to spiritual dimensions. However, the essay to be discussed is on the issue of the spiritual perspective of individuals from different religious faith, and our main religious focus will be on... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Mental Health Nursing Essay

1234 words - 5 pages Nursing practice has revolutionized itself throughout the years. Today we realize the causes of current illnesses as complex and multifaceted (source). In past models, for instance the medical model, the approach was straightforward and neglected the patients active involvement in their care; the patient was viewed as the passive recipient and the doctor, an active agent that “fixed” their patients. ( source). New developed models since then, such as the biopsychosocial model, show us that care focuses on many factors. The model demonstrates understanding of how suffering, disease, and illness can be associated by many factors seen at the different levels in society and the medical... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Neuman Systems Model Essay

1604 words - 6 pages The Neuman Systems Model applies a comprehensive and holistic approach to the care of patients based on the five variables. According to Parker and Smith (2010), the Neuman System Model is described as, “wellness orientation, client perception and motivation, and a dynamic systems perspective of energy and variable interaction with the environment to mitigate possible harm from internal and external stressors” (p. 183). The patient/ family are the client system and interrelate with the five variables namely; the physiological, psychological, sociocultural, developmental, and spiritual beliefs. The Neuman System Model has been used in diverse settings such as, in critical nursing,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Spirituality and Religion Essay

1210 words - 5 pages In the early 1970’s, Betty Neuman created a holistically based, open-system theory to aid nurses in organizing the voluminous information needed to deal with complex client situations (Meleis, 2007, p.307). One component of the Neuman Systems Model is spirituality, which is described as being related to beliefs and influences that are spiritual. It should be noted that this was absent in her initial conceptualization and was developed later (Meleis, 2007, p.307). While utilizing the Neuman framework for client assessment, religion is often applied as a spiritual factor. Using this theory as basis one might conclude that religion and spirituality are synonymous in concept. This begs the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Disruptive and Challenging Behavior Among Schoolchildren

2671 words - 11 pages The significance of providing behavioral management strategies and interventions among young children who have disruptive and challenging behaviors has been a societal phenomenon and a national concern in the recent years (Powell, Fixsen, & Dunlap, 2007). Many young children in school display challenging and disruptive behaviors in school. Some of the widespread challenging behaviors are lack of concentration and organization skills, attention problems, off task behaviors, disruption in classroom, aggressiveness, impulsive behavior and lack of social skills (McConnell, 2001). If these inappropriate behaviors were not properly assessed and treated, young children’s negative behavior will... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The essential elements involved in planning and assessing drama at key stage 3.

2999 words - 12 pages

THE ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS INVOLVED IN PLANNING AND ASSESSING DRAMA AT KEY STAGE 3

"How and by what means do we assess drama? Any assessment should provide a fair, reliable and objective means of placing a student's progress in drama." Neelands, J (2000) Beginning Drama 11-14, David Fulton Publishers.

With no set National Curriculum for drama, with individual schools, practitioners and educators differing beliefs on assessing it and its requirements where do we start? However, no matter the criteria, one thing is clear and that is that planning and assessment go hand in hand. Whether it is to plan for a group or individual student's aims through differentiation constant assessment...

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Specific Applications of Music Therapy In Obstetric Practice

4801 words - 19 pages

Generally the maternal and pediatric nursing care targets well-being of the expectant mothers during all duration of pregnancy, childbirth and the first four weeks just after the birth, as well as furnishing adequate intrauterine development of the fetus and wholesome growth of the newborn. That means that providing care for mothers extends the framework of nursing process (assessment, implementation, and evaluation) from assurance of healthy childbearing through conduction of alleviating childbirth to satisfaction of the early parenting and requires elongation of the nurse's roles to the compilation into one of all...

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Multicultural Sex Offenders and Static-99 Scores

1607 words - 6 pages Sex crimes are one of the most serious problems in the United States today. The legal system is casual when it comes to punishing sex criminals with insufficiently short prison sentences that are further reduced by the option of parole. While sexual offenders comprise a sizable portion of U.S. prison inmates, they evoke an even greater portion of public concern, (Boccaccini, Murrie, Caperton, & Hawes, 2009). Most sex offenders are released back into society after serving as little as one- fourth of their prison sentence. Recidivism is extremely high among sexual predators; 75% are convicted more than once for sexually abusing young people, (Boccaccini, Murrie, Caperton, & Hawes,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Care Plan Essay

2210 words - 9 pages

This is a case study of Sarah, a 39 year old female who presented at the emergency department with her husband, who is worried about her recent behaviour. She is showing classic signs of Hypomania, which is commonly associated with Bipolar Disorder. Hypomania has distinguishing features and can be displayed with high energy levels, positive mood, irritability, inappropriate behaviour, heightened creativity and mystical experiences (Athanasos 2009). Bipolar Disorder sufferers not only experience highs like hypomania, but also the lows of depression. Diagnosis of Bipolar...

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Analysis of Pain Using Conceptual Models by Keena Rossyion

3096 words - 12 pages

Pain is a significant national health problem which is the most common reason people seek out medical care. Poorly treated pain is a major concern for the million of Americans currently suffering with pain. Pain management has become the focus of several regulatory organizations. The American Pain Society created the phrase "Pain, the Fifth Vital Sign," and promoted the need for increased awareness of pain management among healthcare providers (Lafleur, 2004). Pulse, blood pressure, core temperature, and respiration were once the basic vital signs now pain has been added. Measuring and treating pain is part of providing quality care. According to the American Pain Society, 50 million...

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Philosophy’s Prejudice Towards Religion

3919 words - 16 pages Philosophy’s Prejudice Towards Religion ABSTRACT: Religion acquired a bad press in philosophical modernity after a rivalry developed between philosophy and theology, originating in philosophy’s adopting the role of our culture’s superjudge in all of morality and knowledge, and in faith’s coming to be seen as belief, that is, as assent to propositional content. Religion, no longer trust in the face of mystery, became a belief system. Reason as judge of propositional belief set up religion’s decline. But spirituality is on the rise, and favors trust over reason. Philosophy could make space for the spiritual by acknowledging a difference between belief as propositional assent and religious... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Holistic Nurse Self-Reflective Assessment

1444 words - 6 pages Holistic nursing to me is a practice of applying both subjective and objective patient assessment into the plan of care. Not only do we need to look at the physical condition of the patient, but also their social and environmental factors that influence their state of health. When this application process is incorporated into the patient plan of care, we are incorporating all aspects of the patient’s life that help define and create their ideal state of health. In review of several nursing theories discussed by Montgomery-Dossey and Keegan (2012), which incorporate the aspect of holistic nursing practice, I found that Jean Watson’s Theory of Transpersonal Caring was most closely linked to... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Nursing Diagnosis

1463 words - 6 pages J.P., a 58 year old female, presents to the Emergency Room on March 18th. She has a past medical history of cervical cancer, atheroembolism of the left lower extremity, fistula of the vagina, peripheral vascular disease, neuropathy, glaucoma, GERD, depression, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and sickle cell anemia. She complains of right lower extremity pain accompanied by fatigue, a decreased appetite, increased work of breathing, burning on urination, and decreased urine output for three days. On admission, a complete physical assessment was performed along with a blood and metabolic panel. The assessment revealed many positive and negative findings. J.P. was... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Ongoing Health Needs Module: Client Study (Based on Care planning)

2977 words - 12 pages

The purpose of this assignment is to critically review the process of care planning. This shall be done by examining the topic of care planning, focusing on the chosen client and researching the relevant evidence based practice. For the purposes of confidentiality all persons and places have been changed in accordance with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (2002)The client focussed on for this assignment shall be referred to as "Gordon". He was a 76 years old gentleman who had been transferred to the ward for rehabilitation following a right dynamic hip screw operation (DHS) correcting a fractured hip...

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Mental health what it is about, an insight into the nursing care of a depressed patient.

1178 words - 5 pages

This insight is about mental health, "mental health is the balance between all aspects of life - social, physical, spiritual and emotional. It impacts on how we manage our surroundings and make choices in our lives - clearly it is an integral part of our overall health" (youth healthne.ie 2003)

I have chosen to look at depression, which comes under mental health illness. My insight is on a female who 80 years old.Geriatric depression is a very common mental disorder among elderly people. As Bennett and Ebrahim (1993 p118) states, "typically the patient has characteristic features of a depressed mood, and may be tearful, anxious, and lack concentration. There may also be weight loss,...

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Reflection on the nursing process, using Gibbs 1988 model

1465 words - 6 pages

This is a reflective essay based on a situation encountered during my first six-week placement on an ear, nose and throat ward at a local hospital. In order that I could use this situation for my reflection the patient will be referred to as "Mr H". This is in order that his real name is protected and that confidentially maintained in line with the NMC Code of Professional Conduct to

"Treat information about patients and clients as confidential and use it only for the purpose for which it was given."

In order to help me with my reflection I have chosen Gibbs (1988), as the model to help with my reflective process. This model comprises of a process that helps the individual...

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Nursing Process Discipline and Independent Nursing

1565 words - 6 pages Nursing process discipline is a nursing theory developed by nursing theorist, Ida Jean Orlando. This theory, one of the first written about the nursing process, was written to help establish nursing as an independent function in providing health care for a patient. Through this independent nursing function, Orlando developed her theory on the concept of the nurse-patient interaction. During that interaction the nurse recognizes a patient behavior as an “… immediate need for help” (George, 2011, p. 165). This “immediate” need must be correctly identified by the nurse, so the nurse may provide care to relieve the need for help experienced by the patient. Orlando’s creation of the nursing... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Week 5

969 words - 4 pages 3) Write your client’s responses in narrative format for the Explanatory Model of Health: a) What is your definition of health? B.U. defines health as being in a healthy state without any disease or problems. B.U. states that a part of being healthy is eating correctly and exercising. The client states that he doesn’t like going to the doctor so he avoids going, but if he has to go he will. B.U. also states that he doesn’t have a primary physician he just goes to the med clinic. b) What is your definition of illness? B.U. says his definition of illness is being “sick”, and his examples are: “trouble breathing, stomach bug, stuffy nose, and more seriously cancer.” B.U. states that there is... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Health Care Disparities: Nurses Need to Care

1580 words - 6 pages Health Care Disparities: Nurses Need to Care The United States government spent 2.3 billion dollars in 2010 on federally funded healthcare initiatives and programs according to a report from the U.S Department of Health and Human Services (2008). Despite this astronomical amount of money, health care disparities continue to plague disadvantaged populations in the United States. A health care disparity is defined as differences in incidence, mortality, prevalence, disease burden, and adverse health conditions that occur in specific population groups in the United States (National Institutes of Health, 2010). These differences occur as a result of culture, race and geographical location as... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Managing Anxiety While Undergoing Diagnostic Evaluation for Breast Cancer

1046 words - 4 pages Managing Anxiety While Undergoing Diagnosic Evaluation for Breast Cancer Literature Review Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. In 2008, more than one million women underwent a diagnostic evaluation for suspected breast cancer. Approximately 182,500 women of the more than one million that received an evaluation also received a positive diagnosis (Montgomery, 2010). Risk factors linked to Breast Cancer include: gender, age, family history, prior breast cancer, previous biopsy, race and ethnicity, breast density, and long menstrual history because of prolonged hormonal stimulation. Modifiable related risk factors also include hormone... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Infant With Respiratory Difficulties

1118 words - 4 pages Name of Body System and Developmental Age: Infant Respiratory Patient Presentation: Include historical information including family history and genetic considerations, background as well as symptomology and tentative diagnosis. Maria is a six month old infant girl who was born at 40 weeks weighing 7 lbs. 4 oz. and 21 inches long. She is developmentally on track and up to date on all immunizations. Maria currently weighs 15 lbs. and 5 oz. and is 24 inches. She is breast feed and eats baby cereal in the morning. She is starting to be introduced to baby food and finger foods such as baby crackers. Her parents are married and work leaving Maria in daycare 3 days a week. They attend church... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Family Assessment and Nursing Process

5109 words - 20 pages

Family Assessment and Nursing Process

According to Stanhope & Lancaster (2001), a family nursing assessment is considered to be the cornerstone for family nursing interventions and is used in a systematic fashion for the identification of the family's developmental stages and risk factors. There are many tools available that provide guidelines for how to best get to know a family and to determine their strengths and weaknesses. One such tool is the Friedman Family Assessment tool which provides a guideline for nurses to interview a family. Theory is also a necessary tool when assessing a family...

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Watson's Theory of Caring

1908 words - 8 pages Watson’s Theory of Nursing We live in a fast moving environment with longer tiring days. When we are ill we go to the doctor’s office or emergency room and expect fast and reliable service. Data is collected that is measuring satisfaction from the service and, of course that data helps to improve the service. Companies keep track of statistics, like income, housing, children, and cars. I also like numbers and statistics, and like the idea that everything can be measured and have a number associated with it. However, I am wondering if everything can be quantified. Can we reliably measure happiness, love, and care of one person for another? Attempts are made to quantify happiness in some... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Fukishima Disaster

1318 words - 5 pages In the wake of the largest in Japan’s history 2011 Tōhoku 9.0 undersea mega thrust earthquake, and the subsequent an ongoing level 7 event at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant (U.S. Geological Survey, March 11, 2011), we review the Disaster Behavioral Health response and preparedness systems in the United States . The full scale of this disaster is still unknown, and the psychological impacts will likely be felt for many years to come. We both morn the losses of people of Japan and are reminded of the potential risk to our own populace in case of nuclear events where, as of 2008, we recognize the use of over 104 commercial reactors operating in the U.S.. In fact, the radio-nuclear disaster... VIEW DOCUMENT
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This is a essay about music motivation and music therapy. Hope you like it.

1158 words - 5 pages

Motivation from Music Therapy

Definition

Music therapy is the organized appliance of music in the cure of the physiological and psychosocial aspects of a sickness or disability. It focuses on the attainment of nonmusical skills and behaviors, as strong-minded by a board specialized music therapist all the way through systematic appraisal and healing preparation.

History

In USA it began in the late 18th century. Though, using music as a curative medium dates back to prehistoric times. This is obvious in...

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Pain Management and Palliative Care

1614 words - 6 pages Pain is neither objective nor seen or felt by anybody other than the person that is experiencing it. Pain is subjective, therefore there is no way to distinguish whether or not someone is hurting and the only and best measurement of pain is that what the patient says it is. In settings such as end of life care, patients present with many different disease processes and ultimately are there because they have an average of six months to live. Along with this stage in their lives, palliative care patients can encounter a myriad of symptoms, which can result in these patients experiencing tremendous physical and psychological suffering (Creedon & O’Regan, 2010, p. [ 257]). For patients requiring... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Communication Techniques In Stimulated Interaction With a Woman in Labor

1820 words - 7 pages This is a critical analysis of a student’s use and understanding of communication techniques during a ten minute simulated interaction with a woman in labour. The purpose of this written critique, is to enable the student to reflect on their strengths and weaknesses in the use of their communication skills, observed during the recorded interaction. These skills are broken down into areas of interpersonal skills, which are; physical behaviour, active listening, questions and verbal responses; voice, manner and self-awareness. This model of communication that is being used was developed by Hargie and Dickson (2004c). A definition of communication according to Badham (2003, p. 1) is: “A... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Katharine Kolcaba's Theory of Comfort

4029 words - 16 pages Katharine Kolcaba's Theory of Comfort In the early part of the 20th century, comfort was the central goal of nursing and medicine. Comfort was the nurse?s first consideration. A ?good nurse? made patients comfortable. In the early 1900?s, textbooks emphasized the role of a health care provider in assuring emotional and physical comfort and in adjusting the patient?s environment. For example, in 1926, Harmer advocated that nursing care be concerned with providing an atmosphere of comfort. In the 1980?s, a modern inquiry of comfort began. Comfort activities were observed. Meanings of comfort were explored. Comfort was conceptualized as multidimensional (emotional, physical,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Kenya: Where is Kenya? What are some things you know about kenya? How can we help them.

667 words - 3 pages

Kenya is an east African country named for Mount Kenya, the second-highest mountain in Africa. Over 30 million people live grouped into more than 70 ethnic tribes. Eight out of ten Kenyans live in rural areas, mostly farmers in dispersed settlements rather than villages. The remaining population is concentrated in the urban areas of Nairobi (the capital) and Mombassa. Ethnic division, drought, poverty and AIDS account for many of Kenya's problems. With one of the highest rates of population growth in the world, exacerbated by recurring drought, Kenya no...

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Abnormal Behavior of Cults

1962 words - 8 pages Introduction Cults are rare. Due to this rarity they may be considered fascinating to the population. Which could explain why, when cults are mentioned interests peak. This interest is overwhelmingly negative, because the view individuals have of cults is negative in general (Olson, 2006). Although many people may not even be aware of what the word “cult” means. Definitions of cults vary, but overall they are defined as groups, either religious or non-religious, which have distinctive philosophies (Woody, 2009; Young & Griffith, 1992). Instead of understanding what cults actually are, people apply negative connotations to the word. These negative connotations may therefore overshadow the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Health promotion in a diverse community using the tannahill model of health promotion

2073 words - 8 pages

The aim of this case study is to provide a detailed account of a patients holistic health care needs from a health promotion perspective utilising the Tannahill Model which will be described. In promoting the health of the patient maintaining individuality within a diverse community will also be discussed by the application of the model to the patient.

Mary, the patient the study focuses on (surname withheld to uphold confidentiality), was chosen due to the writers involvement throughout the duration of her stay in hospital. The writer met Mary prior to her operation in theatre and was present for the duration of her operation. When Mary was admitted to ward L4 the writer was...

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Yoga and Ayurveda

1282 words - 5 pages Yoga, as defined in America, is known to be a mind-body technique originating from Asia. It is readily available at fitness facilities, on DVD, and even by means of virtual instructors. Today people may practice yoga for a variety of reasons such as; addressing musculoskeletal concerns, physical, mental, and emotional health. Albeit yoga gaining increased popularity, its context does not stem far beyond its ability to reduce stress. Yoga originated in ancient India as a spiritual practice. In Sanskrit the word yoga means union, to yoke or to join (Chaoul & Cohen). It is often depicted as a metaphoric tree with eight “limbs”: yama (universal ethics),Niyama (individual ethics), Asana... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Effects of Unhealthy Human Sexuality on Whole Person Health

2598 words - 10 pages Unhealthy sexual activity has a profound effect on one’s mental, emotional, and spiritual well-being because there is a chemical release that occurs during orgasm that creates a bond between two people; soul ties are created with each sexual encounter; engaging in early sexual activity fosters unhealthy views; sexual abuse is somewhat common, and it is destructive; pornography and the lack of a father figure results in unhealthy views of one’s self. Exploring the chemical bond reveals that there has been much research in regards to the chemicals released in the brain during sexual activity and the effect that the bonds created during such activity has on one’s whole person health. Dr.... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Palliative Care in Health Care

829 words - 3 pages I have been a registered nurse at UCLA for 18 months. One particular issue that has captured my attention is the utilization of palliative care in health care. Because nurses are generally at the bedside all the time, they have an important role to play in voicing the importance of its utilization and implementation in the patient’s care. In 2003, the American Nurses’ Association published a position statement regarding “Pain Management and Control of Distressing Symptoms in Dying Patients.” The organization states: In the context of the caring relationship, nurses perform a primary role in the assessment and management of pain and other distressing symptoms in dying... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Caring For a New Mother

1720 words - 7 pages C.E is a 23 year old Hispanic female who came to the Hospital on April 12th at eight pm for the reason that she was experiencing contractions at less than ten minutes apart as a result of pregnancy, she reported her pain at 8/10 patients vitals were taken upon admission, her blood pressure was elevated 132/84, patients effacement was at 50% upon admission C.E is a gravida 1, para 1(G:1/P:1), her last menstrual period was on 7/5/13 When C.E came to the hospital her fundal height was 39cm and her estimated date of confinement was 4/12/2014. During pregnancy C.E had no complications and the fetus presented no abnormalities she reported taking prenatal vitamins, and a calcium supplement. C.E had... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Ecosystem Services: Deforestation and Soil Erosion

2067 words - 8 pages According to Mooney and Ehrlich (1997), the idea that human beings depend on natural systems traces back as far as Plato. Plato (c. 400 BC) realised that deforestation could lead to soil erosion and the drying of springs (Daily 2007; Gómez-Baggethun et al., 2009). The first modern publication that addresses this concept is in the book Man and Nature written by George Perkins Marsh dated 1864. Marsh started to realize that the world’s resources were not infinite and that natural systems are important to water, soil, climate, the disposal of waste and pest control. He also suggested that Earth’s natural resources were limited by looking at the changes in Mediterranean soil fertility (Mooney... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Changing Youth Discipleship Perspective: From Outward to Inward Ministry

2654 words - 11 pages Introduction Nowadays youth ministry leaders are too much concentrated on creating fun and relaxed atmosphere to bring more people in. We want to get more people in church. We worry that they cannot attach to people. We afraid that new comers will be bored. That is why we so much emphasize relationship in sense of having fun. However the other side of discipleship is being lost. Though Christian teachings have been taught at Bible studies, one-to-one classes, it is not enough. The need of nowadays discipleship and mentoring is to show believers those doctrines, teachings, studies are to be practices. This knowledge should be taught not as simple theory. At the same time if emphasis is made... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Religion in End of Life Care

2968 words - 12 pages Through time, there has always been a question on the idea of another supernatural being, a greater power, or a God. People have grown up and been taught certain beliefs, and some have developed their own beliefs based on this idea of a higher power. There are then those who don’t believe in any such thing; they believe in the facts presented to them. As a whole, the specifics of this idea vary, and as a nurse, understanding of this must be achieved to successfully care for a patient. Hospitals are already known to have a depressing effect on patients, then added onto that are patients who are suffering from acute or terminal illnesses. Their pain in many ways, gets passed on to the nurses... VIEW DOCUMENT
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A Comparison of Christian and Secular Counseling with a Bible Word Study Basis

5158 words - 21 pages

A Comparison � PAGE �18�

Running head: A COMPARISON OF CHRISTIAN AND SECULAR COUNSELING

A Comparison of Christian and Secular Counseling

with a Bible Word Study Basis

Abstract

In order to arrive at a clearer view of Christian counseling, this paper examines the similarities and differences between secular and Christian counseling. It begins with a biblical word study to establish a basis for Christian counseling. The words counsel, comfort, and wisdom are examined in both the Old...

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Synthesis of Learning

1818 words - 7 pages Children learn from their environment and the people that surround them. Children learn through imitating and mimicking what they see around them. They use these skills to problem solve, regulate their behavior, help in memorizing and remembering and also to structure their thinking and concept formation (Siegler & Alibali, 2005, p. 138). There are several theories based on this concept. Lev Vygotsky is one theorist that used social interaction as one of the main approaches to social learning and performed extensive research on exposing children to social and cultural experiences. Children use their prior experiences, interaction with their parents and peers, as well as their siblings, and... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Learning Theory

4362 words - 17 pages

The education field is made up of teachers, researchers, instructors, trainers, and scholars working together to develop and continuously improve the minds of individuals and instruction. Tickton (1970, p.12), as cited in Clark (2001), provides a definition of instructional technology as "a systematic way of designing, carrying out, and evaluating the total process of learning and teaching in terms of specific objectives, based on a combination of human and nonhuman recourses to bring about more effective instruction" (Clark, 2001, p.37). Instructional designers are "trained to use a systematic approach to designing new instructional systems or improving already existing systems" (Dick,...

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Essay on Social Conventions in Jane Eyre and Hedda Gabler

2226 words - 9 pages Social Conventions in Jane Eyre and Hedda Gabler     Charlotte Bronte's novel Jane Eyre and Henrik Ibsen's play Hedda Gabler were written within fifty years of each other in the late 1800s. Both Jane and Hedda exist within the same social contexts. They are women of the middle class in European cultures. The fact Jane is penniless through much of the novel does not exclude her from the middle class. Jane and Hedda's experiences, education and values all belong to the middle class. Therefore it should be no surprise their words echo. In detail and outcome their stories are different. However, it is the constraints of the same social conventions which drive their different destinies. It... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Career Counseling Over the Lifespan

3688 words - 15 pages Abstract Career counseling over the lifespan has more than an occupational focus, it deals with the person’s entire being with a vision that includes one’s lifespan. Career counseling takes into consideration character development, character skills, life roles, individual life and work history, goals, and obstacles. A career counselor not only assists a client with a career plan, but also with a life plan. This paper focuses on two categories of career counseling. The first focus is the history of career counseling as a field of study with the emphasis on when and why career counseling began (1800s as a study of how the shape of one’s head relates to vocational choice), who and what... VIEW DOCUMENT
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This particular study aims to evaluate the care given to a patient diagnosed with leg ulceration.

3598 words - 14 pages

This assignment is concerned with developing skills in the ability to relate theoretical knowledge and evidence, obtained from nursing literature, to a patient for whom caring for. This particular study aims to evaluate the care given to a patient diagnosed with leg ulceration. It will focus on the wound management and bandaging system used, however one important aspect of the successful care regime is the nurse patient relationship (House 1996). This will be assessed to establish if the interaction between the patient and nursing team bore any influence in the care given.

The patient will be called Geraldine, this is to act in accordance with the code of professional conduct, set...

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