Urbanisation Essay Examples

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Urbanisation example in Japan. Essay

1981 words - 8 pages Urbanisation Example in JapanJapanese Business & CultureAn investigation Japanese corporate culture, its trends and changes.1.0 IntroductionThis report is based around the following quote: 'Japan's corporate culture is the product of uniquely Japanese social and historical influences, so deeply rooted as to easily repel outside influences. Bur Japanese corporations need to change their basic goals....'This report will discuss nature of corporate culture in Japan, and why change is needed.The maximum length is 2,000 words2.0 ProcedureThe report was produced using library based research because of the time scale and cost. The sources used include text... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Relationship Between Urbanisation and Climate Change

1715 words - 7 pages Index Topic Page no. Introduction 3 Rationale 3 Key Issues How climate change and urbanisation relate Local perspective National perspective Global perspective 4 Analysis 5 Conclusion 6 Learning Outcome 6 Bibliography 6 Acknowledgement 7 Association between Climate Change and Urbanisation Introduction Urbanisation refers to the physical progression of... VIEW DOCUMENT
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What gave rise to urbanisation in the mediterranean

2316 words - 9 pages “What gave rise to urbanisation in the Mediterranean region?” What is urbanisation? To ‘urbanise’ is to ‘make (a rural area) more industrialized and urban’ , urban meaning ‘of or living in a city or town’ . Marja C.V. Vink argues that “The word urbanization was used for the first time in Spain a little more than one hundred years ago” to show the “quantitative and qualitative growth if cities” . The degree of urbanisation is quite different when comparing towns or cities of antiquity to the modern understanding of an urban centre; however, essentially it is the same process. When talking about the rise of urbanisation in the Mediterranean region 3 main civilisations spring to mind,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Flower Fed Buffaloes by Vachel Lindsay

1238 words - 5 pages My static image is on the poem ‘Flower-Fed Buffaloes’ written by Vachel Lindsay. Urbanisation is one of the dominant and important themes, which is supported by the idea of nature and man. Therefore, my static image is based on this theme. Urbanisation is the process associated with the development of civilisation and technology in a rural area, in which is shown in this poem. ‘Flower-Fed Buffaloes’ is about the rapid extinction and disappearance of not only the buffaloes in America, but also Native American tribes, as a result of urbanisation (shown in the poem through objects like locomotives). The verbal techniques used to portray this theme are the quote and the engraving on the last... VIEW DOCUMENT
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defined urbanization Essay

9210 words - 37 pages Sustainable Urbanisation Achieving Agenda 21 August 2002 This paper is a joint venture between UN-HABITAT and the UK Government Department for International Development (DFID). It was prepared by Carole Rakodi and Fiona Nunan of the International Development Department, School of Public Policy, University of Birmingham, UK and Douglas McCallum, from McCallum Consultancy, Scotland. The project was co-ordinated by Jochen Eigen of UN- HABITAT and Susan Loughhead of the Infrastructure and Urban Development Department, DFID, with inputs from other staff members of UN-HABITAT... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Cause and Consequences of urbanization in Scotland

1545 words - 6 pages Laurie Ann Campbell History A Learning Outcome 1 Cause and Consequences of Urbanisation This essay will explore relevant cause and consequences of urbanisation in Scotland from 1700-1860. A dictionary-defined term would be "the social process whereby cities grow and societies become more urban."(1. 30/08/2005). Scotland went through huge political and economical changes from the 1700's onwards. The country went from being a rural, agricultural society with an estimated population of 1.2 million in 1755, to being urbanised, with the population rising to over 2.6 million in 1841(Lenman, p281,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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What were the key features in changes and developments in Britain’s town and cities c1780-1880?

2812 words - 11 pages What were the key features in changes and developments in Britain's town and cities c1780-1880?During the period of 1780-1880 British towns and cities went through changes and developments. Some of the changes that occurred with these towns and cities throughout Scotland England and Wales were due to the geographical location that allowed industries to grow which gave these areas a better work force. The railway system in Britain which was the fastest means of transport during 1780-1880 was a big revolution as it meant Britain had a fast and efficient way of commuting and transporting around the country. Britain also experienced urbanisation which led to a major... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Show how through an analysis of the content, language and style Eliot's "Preludes" is a reflection of its context

1040 words - 4 pages Modernism was a cultural movement or period style that was dominant particularly in the very late 19th Century through to the end of World War II. As such, it marked a distinctive break from Victorian nobility and morality, and rejected the optimism that was prevalent in the 19th Century. Its ideals were that rationalism would perhaps one day rule humanity, and as such modernism posed a more pessimistic view on society than previous periods. Perhaps the most fundamental idea in modernism is that it is anti-traditionalist. Thus was the context for VIEW DOCUMENT
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Population Change in Australia Essay

992 words - 4 pages This year, the number of people living in Australia is approximately 21, 600,000. Over the years, this number has changed dramatically, increasing by 12.5% in the past decade. Australia's population is constantly varying, although the resident population is not the only factor. The population of Australia is changing in density, age groups, as well as in immigration.Australia is continually changing in population density. It is shown that 85% of the people live within fifty kilometres of the coastline, and 87% live in urban centres with populations over one thousand. Over the years, the rural population density has declined as the urban areas have grown larger. Rural Australia has... VIEW DOCUMENT
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An Analysis of William Wordsworth's "The Female Vagrant"

1633 words - 7 pages In Wordsworth's narrative poem 'The Female Vagrant,' a British female vagrant who grew up in the country narrates her plight which took place during the later part of the eighteenth century when Britain was under urbanization, industrialization, and fighting in the American war for independence. Her plight was a result of the effects which these above mentioned events which were taking place in Britain had on her rural family life. This essay will explore how in the poem,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Modernity

1671 words - 7 pages Sociology Term EssayQ4. What does sociology contribute to an analysis of the culture of modernity ?To understand what sociology brings to a study of our modern culture we must understand how humanity has got to where it is today .We must ask why the way that humans live day to day has changed so dramatically over the past couple of hundred years .We get some of the answers from sociologists who observed and questioned these developments .The study of Sociology itself arrived as a product of modernity.The term modernity is "designed to encapsulate the distinctiveness, complexity and dynamism of social processes unleashed during the 18th and 19th centuries" , which make... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The State of Britain in 1815

1749 words - 7 pages The State of Britain in 1815 After the end of the Napoleonic wars between France and England, which had lasted about a quarter of a century, England was the most powerful country in the world. This had come about because of many changes throughout Britain in Industry, Agriculture, Society, and Politics and also because of International incidents. The culmination of all these changes was that Britain had changed dramatically and had become a much more 'modern' state. In this essay I will be exploring the changes and what effects they had. From about 1750 the Industrial Revolution had begun in Britain, this was the transition from an essentially land... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Assess Marx's claim that Communism would be superior to Capitalism

2258 words - 9 pages We live in a society in which Capitalism is the dominant ideology, encroaching on every part of life. Many defend the west, safe in what they know and safer in what they don't, pointing to the east as a way of reassuring themselves that we are a democratic society, upholding the values of freedom, equality, liberty and fraternity. This is a farce. Although it is hard to prove in practice that communism is 'superior' to capitalism, based on the ideology itself, Communism is morally, socially, economically and ecologically superior - 'situated higher up' the scale of ethics - to capitalism.Based on a system of economics, capitalism is an ideology in which 'wealth is owned by private... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Natural Hazards and Their Effect on Rich and Poor Countries

2589 words - 10 pages Natural Hazards and Their Effect on Rich and Poor Countries 'Poor countries are more at risk from natural hazards than rich countries.' For this question to be answered the meaning of the word "risk" needs to be considered carefully. It may be referring to the risk of loss of lives or money. Perhaps it is referring to geographical location creating more or less of a risk. Natural hazards can cause direct risks and indirect risks. It can have a wide range of interpretations, so therefore each of them need to be... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Four Types of Drainage Basin Stores

1383 words - 6 pages Four Types of Drainage Basin Stores In this essay I intend to give brief descriptions on 4 types of Drainage Basin Stores, and then explain how different human actions can influence these. As explained in previous pieces of work, the water system is made up of several stores and flows, one input (precipitation), and 3 outputs (run-off, evaporation, transpiration). The four main stores I am working on today are Interception, Soil, Surface and Ground water. Water will almost never land directly on a bare surface. Most commonly, when rain is falling it will first hit vegetation – e.g. the leaves on tree branches. The water can then be stored here.... VIEW DOCUMENT
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From An Ontic Community To The Age Of Mobilisation

1126 words - 5 pages Charles Taylor’s argument is based on the theory of secularisation which assumes three premises. First, there is the ground floor which holds the empirical premise according to which there is a retreat of traditional religion. By traditional religion, Taylor means an enchanted world where there is a clear distinction between the sacred and the profane. The traditional religion is characterised by an ontic, hierarchical community who believes in a greater order where everything has its own place. Thus, the individual knows where he belongs within the community and his actions are crucial for the well-being of the community and the natural order. Second, the basement deals with the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The River Rhine Case Study

1472 words - 6 pages The River Rhine Case Study The River Rhine rises in the Swiss Alps about 3,353 metres above sea level and flows north, passing through or bordering Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Austria, Germany, France, and the Netherlands and then its mouth is located at the North Sea. The Rhine is usually at its maximum volume during the seasons of spring and summer; this is due to the fact that there is the melted water of snow and glaciers. In this enquiry I am looking at the aspect of river flooding in the Rhine, particularly in 1995. A river flood is when a river spills its banks onto areas of land surrounding it that are not usually covered by water. ... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Urban Growth and Decline in Sydney, Australia

1112 words - 4 pages Australia is an extremely urbanised country; about 85 per cent of the population lives in coastal areas, and most of these people live in urban areas with populations of over 100 000 people. This accounts for only about 1 % of Australia's total landmass. This level of urban growth is putting much pressure on cities to keep up with the needs of the growing populations. Though some areas of cities are being subjected to urban growth, other areas may be experiencing the effects urban decline. The suburb of Pyrmont-Ultimo in Sydney is a good example of urban growth and decline and its geological processes.Urban... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Cultural Regeneration causing problems of social exclusion.

3478 words - 14 pages IntroductionUrban renewal and social exclusion are two very complex and imperative concepts that cannot be separated. The 21st century has seen a rise in the number of urban regeneration projects across the globe. There has been a lot of research conducted on this subject resulting in a substantial amount of literature published in various countries. The majority of research on this subject has mainly focused on urban renewal with a particular emphasis on how to solve problems of older parts of towns and cities (Khakee et al., 1999). Research indicates that urban renewal has its own merits and inherent problems which need clearly defined strategies to solve them. This nuisance has led to... VIEW DOCUMENT
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An Investigation Of Japanese Corporate Culture, Its Trends And Changes

1932 words - 8 pages An Investigation of Japanese Corporate Culture, Its Trends And Changes Japanese Business & Culture bus 258.1 Table of Contents1.0 Introduction 2.0 Procedure 3.0 Findings 3.1 Changing social culture. 3.2 Business Culture in Japan 3.3 Why change is needed 3.4 What is Japan and her corporations doing to develop and change 4.0 Conclusion 5.0 Bibliography Japanese Business & CultureAn investigation Japanese corporate culture, its trends and changes.1.0 IntroductionThis report is based around the following quote: "Japan's corporate culture is the product of uniquely Japanese social and historical influences, so deeply rooted as to easily repel outside influences. Bur Japanese... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Planning Community for Halstead

2283 words - 9 pages I am an independent planning advisor commissioned by the Sevenoaks District Council to provide recommendations for the future development of Halstead. This report will take into account not only the local issues but also the wider context of housing and development in the UK. Halstead is located 14 miles from London within its Green Belt. It has good communications, both rail and road, and is 28 minutes away from Gatwick Airport. Due to the current shortage of housing in the UK, there is a lot of pressure on the south east of England, especially places around London, to build housing as well as industry. There are some factors prompting counter-urbanisation, the first example are... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Urban Study Essay

2199 words - 9 pages Geography Urban Settlements EssayUrban Settlements Outcome1) Explain the structure of urban settlements in ELDC & EMDC (urban models).Urban settlements began to immerge in the early 18th century in Britain, growing from the urban-industrial society that was becoming present from the start of the Industrial Revolution era. Urban areas may be cities, towns or conurbations. An urban area refers to an area with a high density of... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Japanse Business Culture

2071 words - 8 pages PLEASED GOOD WORKJapanese Business & Culture bus 258.1An investigation of Japanese corporate culture, its trends and changes.Table of Contents1.0 Introduction2.0 Procedure3.0 Findings3.1 Changing social culture.3.2 Business Culture in Japan3.3 Why change is needed3.4 What is Japan and her corporations doing to develop and change4.0 Conclusion5.0 BibliographyJapanese Business & CultureAn investigation Japanese corporate culture, its trends and changes.1.0 IntroductionThis report is based around the following quote: 'Japan's corporate... VIEW DOCUMENT
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To What Extent Did Environment Effect Urban Mentality in the Medieval Times?

1917 words - 8 pages To a large extent the growth of towns in the medieval times greatly altered the mentality of its inhabitants. The social environment created by the mass immigration to towns marks a sharp increase in economic and political awareness, as well as a transition towards a more cultured society, increasingly characterised by intellect rather than religion. However, much has been exaggerated regarding the changes that occurred: in many ways towns remained essentially feudal societies; 'artisans and labourers remained essentially peasants without land' and the peasants who created the bulk of the urban population retained their traditional values.A typical layout for a large medieval town... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Bicultural Education Describe the historical development of one issue of concern to Maori and critically examine the events, attitudes and beliefs that relate to this issue. Discuss the significance...

2041 words - 8 pages James Lochead-MacMillan ID 12413 Surveys held in the 1970's determined that the use of Maori as a spoken language was in severe decline and only begin sustained by an older generation according to Benton & Benton (1999, cited in New Zealand Tertiary College [NZTC], 2009). At this time some Maori were losing the knowledge of their culture they "no longer spoke the language and had little knowledge of Maori…culture" (Soutar, 2005, p.9). Soutar goes on to show a newer generation concerned with revitalising the Maori language and knowledge and raising their children with bicultural access.In the 1970's the education system was mono-cultural and "denied... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Facts about the Global Trends

1750 words - 7 pages Facts about the Global Trends In this essay I will aim to answer the question, “Where, When & Why did the first states form?” This is an important question as the development of the states, is the turning point in civilisation from chiefdoms into a society, which is very similar to the one, which we live in today. The state can be defined many ways by different organisations; political theorists, historians, archaeologists and anthropologists all use different definitions. I will define the state as having a centralised government with, an elite ruling class of powerful families and rulers, a bureaucracy of government and ruling officials, an... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Human Impact on the Environment

1834 words - 7 pages Human Impact on the Environment About three hundred years ago there was a definite spurt in the population of the human race. This was brought about with advancements in sanitation and technology, as well as a dramatic fall in the death rate. By around 1850 the world's population had grown to about 1 billion and by 1930 it had risen to 2 billion. The current figure is around 6 billion and at this rate the United Nations estimates the population will be at about 9 billion by 2054. This would be a 900% increase in just 200 years. This increase in population has meant that the world's resources have been put under a great strain in order to sustain... VIEW DOCUMENT
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INTRODUCING THE SERVICE DELIVERY AND CITIZEN PARTICIPATION CONUNDRUM IN KHAYELITSHA

1773 words - 7 pages 1.1 INTRODUCING THE SERVICE DELIVERY AND CITIZEN PARTICIPATION CONUNDRUM IN KHAYELITSHA This study presents an assessment of connections between service delivery – water services in particular – and participatory strategies adopted by different communities. This study was thought-out within a context of heightened militancy in local government as exemplified by the widespread and so called service delivery protests in 2005-2006. A large body of literature (e.g. Benit-Gbaffou 2008a, 2008b, Piper and Nadvi 2010, Tapscott 2010, 2005, Ballard et al 2006, Miraftab 2006, and Zeurn 2001) already exists on the state-civil society nexus in the post apartheid era. A majority of these studies point... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Economic Growth and Consumption

1785 words - 7 pages Question 2 Consumption and economic growth are the only two effective economic goals worth striving for in a modern globalized society. Do you agree? Consumption and economic growth are like In this essay it will be argued that the economic growth and consumption are unsustainable, environmentally detrimental and have a negative impact on human health and development and are not goals worth striving for in our modern globalized society. An expanding society is not a sustainable one nor is it environmentally friendly and is detrimental to the quality and health of human life. The act of consumption, which is using goods and services and the concept of economic growth, which can be defined... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Chimney-Sweeper explores tenets of romanticism

1476 words - 6 pages PassionThe individualNatureImagination/creativityExplain why your poem is a very good exploration of [x] and [y].William Blake'sThe Chimney-Sweeper in Songs of Innocence effectively explores the archetypal Romantic themes of [x] and [y] through the anecdote of children chimney-sweeps during the late 18th century, London. As the precursor of Romanticism, Neo-Classicism promoted logic and reason, discipline, the Great Chain of Being, Deism, and... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Differences between the North and South on the Eve of the Civil War

1022 words - 4 pages The Differences between the North and South on the Eve of the Civil War On the eve of the Civil war, both the North and the South had differences, both minor and large. The main difference was Slavery where both sides had a completely dissimilar view point on how the treat black people an example of this is the Missouri compromise in 1820. There were also differences in the rate of industrialisation and Education. The largest difference between the North and the South was the number of free black people. The North had hardly any slaves; however the South had around 4 million slaves. The North always looked at the South with antipathy and... VIEW DOCUMENT
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World Development

4211 words - 17 pages World Development INTRODUCTION My coursework will be on World Development and its varied aspects of the three different worlds and their references of MEDC'S and LEDC'S, the decision on why a countries developing, slow development of countries explained and explanation on why the worlds an unfair place. The definition of world development is the progress of resources to improve living standards of those in poverty struck areas. Increasing and easing poor people's basic needs accessibility and supplying the basic living conditions for releasing them from poverty and debt cycles. It also involves the management of materials of wealth within ... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Late 19th Century Law and Order

843 words - 3 pages Late 19th Century Law and Order Thick green smog hung in the air and filth ran in the streets. 19th century London was not a nice place to live. Crime was on the up with burglaries, drunkenness and assault being just some of the crimes committed. Women got a rough deal. There was no work available to them so many women turned to prostitution and alcoholism. Surprisingly enough, however, the percentages of violent deaths was very low, with around 15 murders, and 50 cases of manslaughter a year. The London police force has been active since 1829, when uniformed officers patrolled the streets. Named after their founder, Sir Robert Peel, "bobbies"... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Sexual Behaviors in Thai Adolescents

701 words - 3 pages As in many other countries, sexual risk behaviours in Thai teenagers have increased and they have sexual intercourse at an earlier age. Although in Thai traditional culture premarital sex is not accepted, today’s teenagers in Thailand are embarking on sexual relationships outside the boundaries of marriage. This has been attributed to the increasing influence of western ideas brought by industrialisation and urbanisation (Rasamimari et al., 2007). The proportion of teenage mothers in Thailand has increased from 10.4% to 12.4% between 2000 and 2003 (Thato et al., 2007). A study by Isaranurung et al. (2006) found that 13.3% of all Thai pregnancies occurred in women under 20 years of age... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Mesoamerica and Complex societies

814 words - 3 pages which theory played the biggest part in transformation? Why did it occur in Mesoamerica? Mesoamerica went through a radical transformation since the adaptation of agriculture from their hunter-gather societies into reformed Mayan city states under the control of political hierarchies. The authenticities of these leaders was determined by surplus of goods, particularly maize which was a significant part of their culture and religious connections to the Mayan gods, goddesses and deities. This transformation initiated from Pre-Olmec Period to the Late Classic Maya Period. During this transformation period, Mesoamerica adopted new technology, implemented social identities and political... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Geographical Issues: Air Quality Report

914 words - 4 pages Intro: Air quality investigates the level of contamination and cleanliness throughout the atmosphere of the earth. When the process of industrialization and urbanization started, there were few who realised its effects, and how it impacted on our air quality today. Major factories and industrial sites burnt fossil fuels and emitted unfriendly substances, and still do, all over the world. This process of Air pollution and the contamination of the atmosphere has been pushed to such an extent that it has lead to the belief that the air pollution has dramatically effected and impacted on Major cities and large urban areas, and a lot of people would consider these locations unsustainable for... VIEW DOCUMENT
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shaping the mprden world

955 words - 4 pages Shaping the modern worldThe way we live now and the way our ancestors lived were completely different. Back in the day there were no such things as phones, the internet or a lot of things that we use every day. All types of things like being able to use electricity, living somewhere other than a farm, drive a car, drink tap water are all thanks to the industrial revolution. There were all sorts of thing happening branching of the industrial revolution. This includes the industrial factor (production, inventions of machines), the transport factor (trains, trucks, cars) and the trade factor (countries exchanging products with other countries). At the same time the industrial... VIEW DOCUMENT
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EXPLAIN HOW THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION, IMPERIALISM AND THE MOVEMENT OF PEOPLE (FROM 1750 ONWARDS) CONTRIBUTED TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF AUSTRALIA IN 1901.

718 words - 3 pages EXPLAIN HOW THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION, IMPERIALISM AND THE MOVEMENT OF PEOPLE (FROM 1750 ONWARDS) CONTRIBUTED TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF AUSTRALIA IN 1901. The Industrial Revolution, imperialism, and the movement of people around the globe contributed significantly to the establishment of Australia in 1901. The Industrial Revolution caused overcrowding in Britain, so the colonisation of Australia by the British served as a perfect place to send the rapidly growing number of British convicts. The terrible living and working conditions that the Industrial... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Wordsworth as a Romantic Poet

815 words - 3 pages As a Romantic poet, William Wordsworth valued the ideals of nature, the imagination, individualism and idealism. Literary texts composed during this time were characterised by a search for meaning through representations of the individual's relationship with the natural world, and the power of the imagination to inform, illuminate and transform human experience. Individualism was expressed through new ideas that challenged previous ways of thinking. In his poems 'Tintern Abbey' and 'I Wander Lonely... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Wordsworth as a Romantic Poet

815 words - 3 pages As a Romantic poet, William Wordsworth valued the ideals of nature, the imagination, individualism and idealism. Literary texts composed during this time were characterised by a search for meaning through representations of the individual's relationship with the natural world, and the power of the imagination to inform, illuminate and transform human experience. Individualism was expressed through new ideas that challenged previous ways of thinking. In his poems 'Tintern Abbey' and 'I Wander Lonely... VIEW DOCUMENT
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America's Reluctance to Deal With Gangs and Gang Crime

2547 words - 10 pages The United States of America faces a highly complex problem that is threatening to destroy the fabric of its unique urban society. This problem has been developing for many years and has become entwined into the core of American society to such a point where it has virtually become accepted as the norm to the millions of people whose quality of life has been greatly reduced by it. The problem in its most simple form is crime, however, this is evident as a problem that demands improvement in nearly every country throughout the world, so this essay will look closely at the crime problem that has become synonymous with modern day urban America - gang... VIEW DOCUMENT
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A Case Study of Space in the Lost World of Mitchell and Kenyon part 1 (1897- 1911)

2467 words - 10 pages In this documentary Cruickshank presents three films, constructed from the Mitchell and Kenyon film rolls discovered in a Blackburn chemist shop in 2002. These “create a virtual landscape of the period more extensive than anything comparable in UK cinema.” (Keiller, in Weber and Wilson, 2008, p.35). The British Film Institute restored the fragile nitrate film, producing a compilation of some of the best of the twenty-six hours of filming. The collection included eight hundred and twenty six reels of black and white actuality primitive films, which according to Nelmes “has extended our understanding of cinema’s debt to pre-cinematic genres.” (2003, p.322). Film theory tends to have taken... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Why did revolutionary situations develop in Prussia and France in 1848?

2343 words - 9 pages The revolutions of 1848 in France and Prussia came about due to similar political, economic and social factors. However the nature and reason behind them differed in one particular area.Whilst Prussia was suffering an economic slump and several poor harvests the impetus for revolution came form a desire for universal political freedom, along the same lines and scale as the French revolution of 1789, and... VIEW DOCUMENT
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How have the Yakuza and the Triads been permitted to flourish?

992 words - 4 pages In much the same way as legitimate businesses, Japan’s Yakuza and China’s Triads have been able to flourish because they target local conditions and customs. A greater appreciation of how crime is perceived by police forces, governments and economies is needed in order to understand the reasons for the success and growth of organised crime in these regions. This paper will demonstrate that the Yakuza and the Triads have been encouraged to flourish under these country-specific factors, and also that both Japan and China satisfy the greater criteria needed for... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Need to Reform the Political System in 1815

1466 words - 6 pages The Need to Reform the Political System in 1815 In this question the focus is on the need to reform the political system which was in place in 1815. This meant that people who had a seat in parliament were often the aristocracy or gentry in British society. There was no salary paid to MP’s and therefore only a few people could afford to enter the field of politics. From this quote we can infer that it refers to the needs of a change in organization for the British political system to work fairly for the benefit of the entire British nation in the future. In order to answer this question it is clear that there were indeed people who wanted to reform the ... VIEW DOCUMENT
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How Separatist Groups Have Had Little Success at Gaining Autonomy from the Country Which they are Currently a Part Of

1343 words - 5 pages How Separatist Groups Have Had Little Success at Gaining Autonomy from the Country Which they are Currently a Part Of In this essay I will be aiming to explain how separatist groups have had little success at gaining autonomy from the country which they are currently part of. Autonomy is the right to self government and therefore in my case study of the Basques I will assess whether they have in my opinion been able to achieve this. Map of Basque regionThe Basque region consists of seven "herrialdes", or districts which, for political and administrative purposes, form part of two different more economically developed European countries: Araba, Bizkaia,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Tsarist System of Government of Russia

1392 words - 6 pages The Tsarist System of Government of Russia I believe that throughout history, the Tsars felt threatened. They then reformed in order to stay in power, and to stay in for power alone. However, this mindset only had an effect when the Tsar's power was threatened. Nevertheless, I believe that to find the factors that had an effect on the Russian system of government, one must look for the reason why felt threatened. Here war was an important factor, however it was not the only factor. Otherwise reform would not have occurred without war. I believe that if these other aforementioned factors were important enough to cause political change, then they ... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Stalin Achievment of His Aims in the USSR by 1939

1319 words - 5 pages Stalin Achievment of His Aims in the USSR by 1939 Stalin's objectives are easy to distinguish although the exact time of his ascension to autocracy was a gradual, indistinct one. Although from the same party, he differed considerably from his rivals, such as Trotsky's "Permanent Revolution being the antithesis to Stalin's "socialism in one country". Stalin's aims can be called the "Four faces of Stalinism," and, following the New Economic Policy, passed several Five Year Plans to industrialise and improve the economy. The next one of Stalin's aims was the ideological unification and the developing of the "Stalin cult". Stalin also wanted social... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Liberal Adoption of a Policy of Social Reform in the Period 1906-1914

1537 words - 6 pages The Liberal Adoption of a Policy of Social Reform in the Period 1906-1914 There are many issues to examine when answering the question of what prompted the Social reforms of 1906-1914 such as the changing ideas of the British public and national efficiency which was decreasing. In the period of 1906-1914, the social reform acts were passed in parliament by the Liberal government under Herbert Asquith PM, Lloyd-George MP and Winston Churchill MP. These acts laid the foundations of a basic welfare state on which our current welfare state was built from. These acts provided basic support for mothers and children, the old, sick and the unemployed. These... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Planning in the UK

1161 words - 5 pages The range of planning powers, controls and policies should be reduced. Explain how one might agree and disagree with this statement. I will approach this title focusing on planning in the UK. First briefly defining powers, controls and policies as they are today. A quick historical review of the modern planning system and changes to it will help give context in deciding whether to increase or decrease them. I'll then move on to a discussion on the factors and organizations likely to cause change in the planning system. Planning powers are in the UK known as Delegated powers. These enable planning officers make decisions on applications. In doing so planning officers are allowed a level of... VIEW DOCUMENT