Vaccinations Essay Examples

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Vaccinations: A Clear Benefit Essay

1932 words - 8 pages A clear definition of a vaccination is, “the generic term for immunization procedures. Immunization is a procedure whereby living or nonliving materials are introduced into the body…:” (Nosal, 1999) The concept that people who survive an infectious disease do not get the same disease again is the basis for the administering of vaccinations. Vaccines are normally given to healthy individuals for the prevention of diseases. Vaccines work by using a human host to provide a stimulus to the immune system. Immunization is used for viral and bacterial diseases. Rappuolli reports and predicts, “Vaccines will not only be used to prevent infections, but also to cure chronic infectious diseases VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Benefits of Vaccinations Essay

1144 words - 5 pages Introduction Vaccines against diphtheria, polio, pertussis, measles, mumps and rubella, and more recent additions of hepatitis B and chicken pox, have given humans powerful immune guards to ward off unwelcome sickness. And thanks to state laws that require vaccinations for kids enrolling in kindergarten, the U.S. presently enjoys the highest immunization rate ever at 77%. Yet bubbling beneath these national numbers is the question about vaccine safety. Driven by claims that vaccinations can be associated with autism, increasing number of parents are raising questions about whether vaccines are in fact harmful to children, instead of helpful (Park, 2008). Positives for Vaccinations VIEW DOCUMENT
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Negative Effects of Vaccinations Essay

1392 words - 6 pages A parent can’t go a week without hearing about vaccinations and the problems they will cause our children. Generally the advertised negative effects of the vaccinations are immediate, whereas others may indicate they cause problems later in life. In the day and age of the internet, what is a person to do? Get informed. Don’t take the information that is presented to you on Facebook, Twitter, email, or through the grapevine as science. Vaccinations have become a very taboo subject for parents today. There is plenty of mis-information out there on the downsides of vaccinations, but none stand up to scientific inspection. Where has the concern about vaccinations come from? When the majority VIEW DOCUMENT
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Do we need vaccinations? Essay

1368 words - 5 pages INTRODUCTIONI was asked to produce a case study on the topic of "Vaccinations". I was asked to come up with a question relating to the topic of Vaccinations, and the question that I came up with was "Do we need vaccinations?"Firstly, I will be finding out some background information about vaccinations and what their purpose is. I think that people should be interested in answering my question as it could apply to them and affect their health in some way.There will be two sides to my argument (for and against) of why/how we need vaccinations; so I have conducted some research form the internet, from books, and other scientific knowledge to back up each side of the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Ethics Of Optional Infant Vaccinations Essay

1131 words - 5 pages States, such as Texas, who give legal guardians the option of not vaccinating their children during the newborn-to-two-year-old period, because of the recent scare of supposed "links" between said vaccinations and autism, are unnecessarily putting not only themselves and their children, but the entire country at risk of a disease outbreak that can otherwise be avoided altogether.In the last decade or so, there has been a large movement of concerned parents, led by such celebrities as Jenny McCarthy, Jim Carrey, and Robert F. Kennedy Jr., that have pushed for states to give parents the choice on whether or not to VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccinations: The Answer to Childhood Fatalities

1105 words - 4 pages America’s parents have taken to creating vulnerable children. Wary adults are neglecting vaccinations that control preventable diseases across the country. No child should be subjected to the susceptibility of an unvaccinated immune system. In this day and age, there is no reason for parents to avoid inoculations because the once fatal health risks, financial insufficiencies, and moral qualms that once presented a reason for doubt have dwindled away. Fatal diseases such as Measles, Polio, and Tetanus are preventable through vaccination, but manage to run rampant when parents subject their children to these illnesses by failing to have them vaccinated. One of the primary reasons that VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccinations Necessary to the Nation’s Youth

1788 words - 7 pages which prevented more suffering and saved more lives than any other medical procedure. Epidemic diseases, such as small pox or polio, which once plagued populations of Europe only some one hundred years ago, declined more than ninety percent thanks to the medical breakthrough of immunization (Schneibner XVII). Vaccinations, clearly, enabled the near to complete eradication of diseases, that historically claimed millions of lives (Binski 9). The science behind immunization traces back to an ancient Indian practice called variolation, which meant intentionally exposing a virus to create immunity. In 1976, Dr. Edward Jenner used this concept to create the first contemporary vaccine. He VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccinations and Their Possible Link to Autism

1131 words - 5 pages this statement is the pertussis toxin in DPT vaccinations cause a chronic autoimmune monocytic infiltration within the gastrointestinal system. The toxin may cause a disconnection between mucosa lamina propia and the G-alpha protein receptors in the retinoid. This causes a non-specific immune response that cannot be down regulated (Ratajczak, 2011). Further, it is though that an organism within the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine. It is thought that the live vaccine causes the vitamin A supply within a child’s body to deplete, which is a possible cause for distorted vision that autistic people have (Ratajczak, 2011). The PHAC (2012) states that immunizations with multiple diseases VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Debate Over Vaccinations for Adults and Children

1305 words - 5 pages A very controversial issue these days is whether or not to receive immunizations. I am a young mother and I tend to follow my mothers and doctors’ advice when it comes to mine and my children’s health, I feel as though my doctor has the best advice on how I can keep us all happy and healthy, however this is not the case for everyone. Many questions have arisen about immunizations and there are quite a few people who are either hesitant to or will not have themselves and their children immunized. I am a person who believes that children and adults should be immunized, by not receiving vaccinations it is possible to be putting the public at risk for more diseases. It should not matter what VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccinations Should be Mandatory in the State of California

2212 words - 9 pages Vaccinations should be mandatory for all children within the State of California as this will reduce the death rate associated with preventable communicably infectious diseases. Routine vaccinations during early developments have been historical proven to reduce the onset and spread of potentially infectious microbial agents. According to the Center of Disease Control and Prevention, “Vaccines have reduced some preventable infectious diseases to an all-time low, and now few people experience the devastating effects of measles, pertussis, and other illnesses (Prevention). Representatives, I’m sure that some of you in here, right now, agree that our further relies heavily VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccinations: Vaccines Should Be Mandatory For All People

1367 words - 5 pages Vaccinations are designed to help people go through their everyday life. A country doctor, Edward Jenner, who lived in Berkeley, England, first administered vaccines in 1796 (Health Affairs). Throughout history, vaccinations have become better to where they are safer for the human body. Everyone should get vaccinated against certain disease to stay healthy. Vaccines have been proven to make people immune to serious diseases (Childhood Immunization). By being vaccinated the person is not only helping themselves but others around them too. Vaccines are an important tool for preventing disease and should be mandatory for all people. Childhood vaccines protect children from a variety of VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccination Impact Throughout History

1397 words - 6 pages Although, vaccinations have been around for a long time, the great controversy surrounding the uses were substantially less when first accepted. Over time, vaccines have been created for diseases such as polio, small pox, chicken pox, the common flu; as well as being improved and continually updated. Prior to the development of vaccines, diseases were a great concern to the people due to their wide and rapid spreading. Vaccines became very popular and were believed to be essential in order to maintain a healthy society. The amount of people suffering from many of the diseases that vaccines now exist for has significantly gone down since vaccines inception. In fact, vaccines have even been VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Discovery of Vaccines Prevented The Spread of Infectious Diseases

1584 words - 6 pages The discovery of vaccines prevented the spread of infectious diseases around the world. Vaccines control the spread of diseases such as measles, tuberculosis, smallpox, and the flu. In addition, vaccines increase the overall health of not only individuals, but of populations. Although these benefits prove effective on the world wide scale, the requirement of vaccinations of children to enter the public school system remains a current public health concern. Some argue that vaccines are dangerous for children and can lead to adverse effects. Others assert that the enforcement of requiring children to be vaccinated before entering schools protects the health of those attending school. These VIEW DOCUMENT
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Parents Should Have More Say in Vaccinating Children

2475 words - 10 pages nothing that they did to her. She was given her Hepatitis B vaccine without ever giving it a second thought. The doctor said that it was necessary, so be it. Many go through life following doctor’s orders without ever thinking “what if they’re wrong?”, “what if this makes me sick?” Doctors are people whom we trust, without question. We take their advice and always assume that they would never do anything to put us or our children into harm’s way. Our best interest is always in their forethought, or at least, that is our assumption. Even though many of us trust our doctors without fail, many parents are choosing to take a different approach these days when it comes to vaccinations VIEW DOCUMENT
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Infant Mortality Rate-Government Policy To Blame?

1895 words - 8 pages taken out of the picture, white infants have an overwhelming majority of the infant deaths in the United States (Goldman, 8). This seems to indicate that the problem has spread across all social classes and cannot be blamed upon simply living standards or genetic factors among minorities. Another finding from the study suggests that sudden infant death syndrome may be directly correlated with vaccinations for diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus toxoid. Of those that died after receiving these immunizations, “6.5% died within 12 hours of vaccination; 13% within 24 hours; 26% within 3 days; and 37%, 61%, and 70% within 1, 2, and 3 weeks, respectively” (Goldman, 6). Babies that were administered VIEW DOCUMENT
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Supply and Demand: Pharmaceuticals

860 words - 3 pages Changes in Supply, Demand, and PriceIntroductionPrior to 2004, vaccinations to prevent the most common human diseases were readily available. In the 1950s, there were 26 pharmaceutical companies that made vaccines in the United States; however, by 2004 only four such companies remained. For instance, while the demand for the flu vaccine has risen sharply, the supply of the vaccine has declined; consequently, the price of the vaccine has increased. The problem has now reached widespread proportions. "Over the past three decades the vaccine infrastructure in the United States has steadily crumbled VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Importance of Childhood Vaccination

1483 words - 6 pages Since the introduction of vaccinations, medical science has managed to all but eliminate many formally fatal and debilitating childhood illnesses in countries where the immunization of children is nearly universal. Diseases such as measles, mumps, diphtheria, rubella and polio have been relegated to a marginal status in developed countries with active immunization campaigns; smallpox is actually considered to have been completely eliminated from the earth, without a single case having been reported since roughly 1979 (“Childhood”). Largely centered around a study published in 1998 in the British medical journal “The Lancet”, there has been an upsurge in concerns of the safety of VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Importance of Childhood Vaccination

1521 words - 6 pages Since the introduction of vaccinations, medical science has managed to all but eliminate many formerly fatal and debilitating childhood illnesses in countries where the immunization of children is nearly universal. Diseases such as measles, mumps, diphtheria, rubella and polio have been relegated to a marginal status in developed countries with active immunization campaigns; smallpox is actually considered to have been completely eliminated from the earth, without a single case having been reported since roughly 1979 (“Childhood”). Largely centered around a study published in 1998 in the British medical journal “The Lancet”, there has been an upsurge in concerns of the safety of VIEW DOCUMENT
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Religion as a Threat to Vaccination

1373 words - 5 pages countries. However, smaller scale communities sometimes struggle to reach thresholds due to larger magnitudes of unvaccinated individuals. Individuals may not be vaccinated because of age, medical issues, or personal objections. Such objections can have many roots, including philosophical, moral, personal, and religious reluctance. Imdad et al. (2013) indicated that throughout the United States, that while regulations for vaccination exemptions are determined on state-by-state basis, the overall rate of exemptions for mandatory vaccinations granted on religious grounds has risen in recent years, when previously the rate of such exemptions remained constant. Individuals with religious VIEW DOCUMENT
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It is Advisable that Everyone Should Get Vaccinated Against H1N1 Influenza

1048 words - 4 pages vaccine, how high authorities are hardly helping the poor countries with their struggle to afford vaccinations, and what groups of people are considered the “priority groups” throughout America. I feel that it is definitely advisable for everyone to be vaccinated against H1N1 Influenza (“Swine Flu”) because the vaccination can prevent citizens from contracting the flu and from spreading the flu further, even though most citizens are not qualified to receive the vaccine at this time due to priority population groups receiving them first. First, it is advisable that everyone should get vaccinated against the H1N1 Influenza because it can prevent citizens from contracting the Swine Flu. The VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccines Are Not the Cause of Autism

804 words - 3 pages For recurrent generations, there encompasses numerous controversies surrounding vaccinations for children in addition to the unfavorable reactions that may arise. The chief concerns are whether vaccinating causes serious developmental delays such as autism in children. The aim of this composition is to enlighten others that vaccinating children does not bring about autism. By means of scientific exploration along with advanced medical diagnosis in children, researchers currently recognize that the increase in autism claims are not vaccine linked. Koch (2000) affirms that, “drugmakers and health officials say there is no proof of a causal relationship among vaccinations and severe VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccines Should Be Required

2339 words - 9 pages a parent must look at both sides when choosing whether or not to vaccinate a child. Not vaccinating a child puts them at a higher risk of a deadly or crippling disease than they have of experiencing side effects from the vaccine (“The harm of Skipping…”). It would be better to risk the slight chance of a side effect, which can be treated or often times resolves on its own, then take the risk of the child contracting a disease that could be life threatening. While there is a small possibility of complications due to vaccinations not vaccinating your child because of the fear of adverse side effects would be much like not giving your child an antibiotic to treat an illness because of the VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Debate Over Vaccination

732 words - 3 pages Getting a shot can be a scary experience for children and their parents. Vaccinations protect children from dangerous infections by introducing a weak or dead pathogen triggering the body to defend itself. Sometimes these pathogens can harm the child which makes some parents wonder if the risk is worth the reward. Two opposing articles on immunization will be analyzed to determine which argument is more successful. The first article is “Immunization Is a Question of Science, Not Faith: How I Evaluated the Immunization ‘Debate’ “, by Chanda Cooper-Warren. Her article appears on the website www.quackwatch.org, and is written with the authority of a concerned mother without any medical VIEW DOCUMENT
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Skipping Childhood Vaccination Is Not Neglect

1204 words - 5 pages Skipping Childhood Vaccination Is Not Neglect According to The Guardian, everyday approximately 11,000 babies are born in the United States of America. From the time they are born, they are required to be immunized. In the first few hours of life, these newborns receive the Hepatitis B vaccine. There are parents however who are skeptical about the potential side effects of all the vaccines. They think that immunizations are going to harm their children by causing them to develop neurological deficits. Unfortunately, schools are putting pressure on the parents by creating mandatory vaccination requirements as part of the admission process. Although childhood vaccinations have proven to VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccines: The Best Choice for Our Children?

1489 words - 6 pages norm can elicit detrimental effects and bring about the question: is complying with the current vaccination regimen really the best decision for our children? The history of vaccination dates back to the late 1700’s with Edward Jenner’s success in discovering a way to immunize an individual against smallpox (Children’s, 2013). Since then, many different vaccinations have been formulated against diseases, such as diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis B, haemophilus influenza type b, and varicella (Children’s, 2013). A number of combination vaccinations such as MMR, MMRV, and DTP have also been developed (Children’s, 2013; Klein et al., 2010). These VIEW DOCUMENT
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Reasons of why Vaccines are our Future

1930 words - 8 pages was initiated by Dr. Andrew Wakefield. He conducted a study of twelve children whom their parents believed that the vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella gave them autism. Of course this information was published in a medical journal. When parents began to read the newly discovered information, vaccinations became the reason that the children were not normal. At that point children were not getting immunizations as they were before. Millions of dollars were then spent to verify the Wakefield study to ensure the safety of children in the world. Several years after the study concluded it was discovered that Wakefield used money to fund his study by lawyers who represented the VIEW DOCUMENT
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MMR+Autism

2520 words - 10 pages Biochemical Engineer who is a Professor in Biology at Simpson University, he has an autistic child who he describes as "vaccine injured" . Hooker is on the Board of Directors of Focus Autism. This organization main goal is to put an end to harming children with vaccinations, he also runs the Anti Vaccination Campaign A Shot Of Truth. Hooker continues to bring up anti vaccine conspiracy theories and has many followers to go along with it, One being the actress Jenny McCarty. Hooker is important because, he has resurrected Wakefield's findings, and he is also the person that is claiming that VIEW DOCUMENT
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MMR+ Autism

2520 words - 10 pages Biochemical Engineer who is a Professor in Biology at Simpson University, he has an autistic child who he describes as "vaccine injured" . Hooker is on the Board of Directors of Focus Autism. This organization main goal is to put an end to harming children with vaccinations, he also runs the Anti Vaccination Campaign A Shot Of Truth. Hooker continues to bring up anti vaccine conspiracy theories and has many followers to go along with it, One being the actress Jenny McCarty. Hooker is important because, he has resurrected Wakefield's findings, and he is also the person that is claiming that VIEW DOCUMENT
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Flawed Protection

1144 words - 5 pages the tissue of an aborted human fetus, several times to reduce its potency. (www.cdc.gov) The pros of vaccinations are avoiding future outbreaks of diseases, not getting vaccinated could potentially harm other children, and diseases that were formally killing thousands of people are now becoming dormant. Polio has been pretty much eradicated because of vaccinations, although it is not 100% gone. If you stop vaccinating, the virus can spread and cause partial paralysis or even death. Some examples are Hepatitis B, Whopping cough, Tetanus, and Mumps. Hepatitis B sometimes causes fatal liver damage. Whooping Cough is a serious illness that can last for weeks and can lead to pneumonia. Tetanus VIEW DOCUMENT
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Smallpox: The Multi-Millennium Scourge

1055 words - 4 pages once these symptoms become apparent, there is little medical treatment available. The infected person is isolated from the general public and provided medical treatment, but all treatment at this stage of the infection is solely to prevent secondary infections. The World Health Organization (WHO) considered smallpox to be eradicated in 1980. Nine years earlier, in 1971, the U.S. had already eliminated routine smallpox vaccinations. However, due to recent terrorist threats and attacks, including the tragedies on September 1, 2011, smallpox vaccinations were provided to most military, healthcare, and emergency personnel. Currently, the U.S. and Russia are the only countries that maintain VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Vaccination Scandal

1378 words - 6 pages Imagine an outbreak, one of the most infectious viruses that thrives most in adolescents or infants, lets say the measles, happens in your hometown. Presumably, you and your family are all safe, for you have all been immunized. But your neighbor’s child (for now, lets say Tim) has yet to get vaccinated, and his parents refuse. Tim’s parents have strict moral values, which infringe on his ability to get the medication he genuinely needs. They believe vaccinations cause autism, vaccines do more harm than good, and by not immunizing, their kids build up a stronger immunity. Aside from the paranoia and false side effects vaccines cause, they can help to build up your immune system and are a VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Benefits of Prolonging and Separating Vaccines

2233 words - 9 pages components of the vaccines, making them vastly different from what they were in generations past. Separating these vaccines can make a large difference in how a child’s body reacts to the new generation of vaccines. Vaccines can not only be separated out of the combinations that are most common, they can be prolonged. Some parents choose to give vaccines only every six months, others choose to wait to start any vaccinations until their child is two years of age (Miller, 2014). Parents have choices today, follow the recommended dosage schedule or prolong and separate their child’s vaccines. In doing the latter, and infant’s body systems have time to mature, side effects may be reduced, and parents VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Flu Shot Should Not Be Mandatory

1324 words - 5 pages Should the Flu Shot Be Mandatory? Vaccines have been proclaimed by many people as one of the miracles of modern medicine. Vaccines are credited with saving thousands of lives and wiping out many contagious diseases. Recently, there has been a tremendous debate whether annual influenza vaccines should be mandatory. Influenza vaccines should be voluntary because people have the right to examine data on vaccinations and make their own informed decisions. Although people should have the freedom to choose to be vaccinated, the public needs to be educated about the personal, economical, and social benefits of receiving the influenza vaccine. In addition VIEW DOCUMENT
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Polio Virus

781 words - 3 pages Polio Virus Introduction The polio virus which causes poliomyelitis in humans is an enterovirus which belongs to the picornavirus (small, RNA) family. Polio virus is rapid, acid-resistant, stable, highly tissue specific and consists of a single-stranded, positive RNA. Polio virus is able to reside in the throat or intestinal tract of humans. Poliomyelitis is a highly contagious infectious disease which has three strains, poliovirus 1 (PV1), PV2 and PV3. Polio virus, although rare in developed countries, can be found in many under-developed countries due to the uncommonness of vaccinations there. Polio is known as a disease of development. The oldest known record of polio is in an VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Hepatitis B Virus and Vaccination

1670 words - 7 pages HBV vaccinations for all children at birth. In 1995, this was extended to include recommendations for the routine HBV vaccinations of all adolescents (Betel). Parents retain the right to refuse the vaccination for their children, but as of April 1998, 35 states require HBV vaccinations for children to enter daycare, kindergarten, high school, and college (Schumacher). The arguments put forth by those who support universal vaccination include a variety of statistics as well as assurances that side effects to the vaccine are few and quite rare. High risk targeted vaccinations have been unsuccessful because many of those at risk are unaware of their status or do not fully understand the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Autism

1563 words - 6 pages In April 1999, Mary Gorman wrote the following:"I hear a mother complaining about her child talking back to her and think...I wish my child could talk. I see two brothers play tag at the park and think...I wish my child could do that. I hear a mother complain about her daughter's choice of wardrobe and think...I wish my child could choose and dress himself. I see my son line up his legos, and think...I wish he could build something with them."A mother of a nine-year old autistic child wrote this passage.Every child born in the US is supposed to get a variety of vaccinations in the first VIEW DOCUMENT
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Evaluation of Vaccination Programs and Quarantine in Australia

1857 words - 7 pages . Furthermore, the Newcastle disease is a highly contagious viral disease of domestic poultry, aviary birds and wild birds. Outbreaks of the Newcastle Disease in recent years have been localised in areas of NSW and were eradicated between 1998 and 2001.Problems and Draw Backs of VaccinationOne draw back of vaccination is that many people experience minor side effects following immunisation. Most of these only last a short time and the person recovers without any problems. Besides minor symptoms as a result of vaccines there are also vaccinations, such as the small pox and MRR vaccines, which can be fatal when given, but if the vaccine is not given the disease itself can be deadly as well VIEW DOCUMENT
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Understanding the Importance of Immunisation

2413 words - 10 pages those diseases when they're exposed to them. Also the National Immunisation Program has ensured that diseases like tetanus and polio have disappeared in the UK there's still the chance that it could return. The 2 types of immunity-active and passive immunity-are both different. Vaccines given for such diseases are only given so it won’t re-occur. Priority vaccinations such as for polio, tetanus, MMR are mostly given at birth. Booster doses for these are then given later on in life. Active immunity is different to passive immunity as active immunity is when the body makes its own anti-bodies while passive immunity is obtained by ready-made anti-bodies VIEW DOCUMENT
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Autisim

1686 words - 7 pages agree on the answer. The main bandwagon that was jumped on and is still a big argument is that vaccinations is what causes children to become autistic. This idea came about as the rise in autism was noticed to spike in the 1980’s which happened to align with the push to increase childhood vaccinations. When scientists began to look into what could have possibly been the link to the vaccinations and autism, they came to a general consensus that the children were being exposed to too much mercury. However, after scientist began to look into this theory the science could not lie, all children who were receiving the same vaccinations were not becoming autistic. While science has been able to VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Influenza Vaccination Debate

2331 words - 9 pages Mandatory Influenza Vaccinations for healthcare providers can be a controversial topic for some and may propose a challenge to some provider’s ethical values and beliefs. The topic of mandatory vaccination for influenza (“flu”) has been widely studied and debated among professionals over several years. It is apparent that there is some movement towards a mandatory vaccination for influenza by healthcare institutions as the benefit out weighs the risk on several fronts. “Influenza infection is associated with 36,000 excess deaths and > 200,000 hospitalizations in the United States annually. It is the leading cause of vaccine-preventable death in the United States every year” (Babcock VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Vaccines for Children

2482 words - 10 pages health care thus having the children miss much needed vaccines. This program helps to ensure that all children, regardless of ability to pay have an improved chance of getting their recommended vaccinations on time. Vaccines available through the VFC Program are those recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices also known to health care professionals as ACIP. Funding of this program comes from OMB, Office of Management Budget and CMS or Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The VFC program does not just stop at providing the appropriate vaccines for children, but this program also helps to educate medical providers and professionals by education, providing free VIEW DOCUMENT
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Decisions in Paradise III

2579 words - 10 pages are not of legal age to buy and sell real estate. The medical problems of HIV/AIDS and the avian flu can also affect the lives of our employees working there as well as the community of Kava. And the language barrier might hinder the communication with the people of Kava when dealing with business negotiations, hiring, training, and general communication.Evaluate resources and actionsProviding disaster training, vaccinations, hiring legal age labor and support, and overcoming the language barrier are four ways to establish a greater presence in Kava. We need to accomplish these goals and it will take organization and motivation with everyone in our VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Medical Similarities Between Dogs and People.

1777 words - 7 pages -bodies and minerals), gives them protection from disease germs. The antibodies in the mother's milk protect the puppies for about the first six weeks. These antibodies come either from the mother's own experience in fighting disease, or from vaccines that the mother received. When this maternal immunity is in affect, it also blocks the effectiveness of vaccines in the newborn puppies. Therefore vaccinations are not given until the puppies are seven to eight weeks old. At that point, the maternal immunity has started to wear off. ('Pet Medicine' p.25)Vaccinations for puppies continue every few weeks until they are VIEW DOCUMENT
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Rhetorical Analysis - Just Say No To Flu Vaccines

1162 words - 5 pages Just Say No! The title of the article written by a blogger and newsman named Harry Fuller who writes to share his personal truths about the government's involvement in the administration of flu vaccinations. The purpose of the article is to persuade anyone with the ability to make a decision about vaccinations for themselves or their dependents to "Just Say No" to getting the flu vaccine and to be concerned about government control. To accomplish this, Fuller uses sarcasm with VIEW DOCUMENT
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Ethics

2561 words - 10 pages its efficacy and economy. Vaccines present a relatively easy method of eliminating a myriad of diseases at a tremendous overall savings in healthcare dollars when compared to long-term disease treatment. However, this endeavor will only succeed if a large percentage of the population, up to 95% in some cases, become inoculated (Wood-Harper, 2005). Therein is the dilemma. Historically, voluntary compliance with vaccine protocols has been rather poor (Backer, 2005; Wood-Harper). On the other hand, mandating vaccinations creates another set of problems, not the least of which includes moral and ethical considerations.Bioethical IssuesEthical positions regarding the implementation of VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism

3216 words - 13 pages three different vaccinations would be safer. Since then, Wakefield’s research has been discredited, he was charged with serious professional misconduct by the General Medical Council for violating several ethical practices, and he was investigated for failing to disclose conflict of interest – a pending patent on a rival measles vaccine (Gross, 2009). Although false, many still believe wholeheartedly that vaccines are harmful. Wakefield’s Study In the 1998 article in the Lancet, Wakefield studied 12 children “who, after a period of apparent normality, lost acquired skills, including communication” (Wakefield, Murch, Anthony, Linnell, Casson, Malik, Berelowitz, Dhillon, Thomson, Harvey VIEW DOCUMENT
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National Influenza Immunization Program - The Swine Flu of 1976

4026 words - 16 pages penetration of cells by the virus. Also, neuraminidase antibodies help to lessen the release of viruses from cells and the disease's spread. (Silverstein: 52-54) Because of these reasons, the scientists in 1976 chose to create a vaccine against the swine flu. Another question surrounding the action to be taken involved whether to stockpile the vaccine after manufacturing it for the country, or immediately moving to immunization. It was decided to go ahead with immunization, because they had a good amount of time until the next flu season to organize the project, the threat of swine flu seemed real, and if they waited until influenza hit they would not have time to start the vaccinations before the VIEW DOCUMENT
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INOCULATION TO DISABILITY AND DEATH

2531 words - 10 pages the critical dilemma on vaccinations, in order to prove that indiscriminate vaccine immunizations are dangerous, causing chronic injuries, lifetime disabilities and often death. There is a media informational war about immunizations. On one front "the crusaders against the vaccines", mainly people who had loved ones ruined by vaccine complications. Some of these become extremists, and in the name of an alleged crisis of scientific paradigms, look to the solution being ”A non-pharmacological medicine“. On the other front, one part of the medical world, vehemently supported by some multinational pharmaceutical companies, assigns to immune prophylaxis the defeat of any infective disease VIEW DOCUMENT
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AIDS a manmade disease or not, what the US Government doesn't want you to know.

733 words - 3 pages and Lilli Segal found that the HIV is genetically engineered hybrid of the visan virus(cause of sheep-borne brain disease) and a virus called HTLV-I (HIV was originally named HTLV-III), which causes white blood cell cancer. In 1978 more than a thousand nonmonogamous homosexual adult males received experimental vaccinations against hepatitis B, courtesy of the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control. Within 6 Years 64 Percent of those men had AIDS. Then not much long after that the World Health Organization administered a smallpox vaccination program in Africa which led to the outbreak of AIDS.(VANKIN 300)Are these all coincidences linked?, it seems to be all VIEW DOCUMENT
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History and Eradication of Smallpox

2375 words - 10 pages course of action was based on a plan that depended entirely on mass vaccinations of susceptible people in endemic countries. However after initial trials, the WHO organization found that mass vaccinations were effective in loosely populated countries like in South America and the small African countries, but it was virtually impossible for the course of action to work in countries as densely populated as India, Pakistan, or Indonesia (Fenner 1988). The evolution of a new strategy evolved when an outbreak started in Nigeria. In Western Nigeria where 90% of the population had been vaccinated, an outbreak broke out from among a group of religious fanatics that refused the vaccine. With the medical VIEW DOCUMENT