Vaccinations Essay Examples

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Vaccinations: A Clear Benefit Essay

1932 words - 8 pages A clear definition of a vaccination is, “the generic term for immunization procedures. Immunization is a procedure whereby living or nonliving materials are introduced into the body…:” (Nosal, 1999) The concept that people who survive an infectious disease do not get the same disease again is the basis for the administering of vaccinations. Vaccines are normally given to healthy individuals for the prevention of diseases. Vaccines work by using a human host to provide a stimulus to the immune system. Immunization is used for viral and bacterial diseases. Rappuolli reports and predicts, “Vaccines will not only be used to prevent infections, but also to cure chronic infectious diseases,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Benefits of Vaccinations Essay

1144 words - 5 pages Introduction Vaccines against diphtheria, polio, pertussis, measles, mumps and rubella, and more recent additions of hepatitis B and chicken pox, have given humans powerful immune guards to ward off unwelcome sickness. And thanks to state laws that require vaccinations for kids enrolling in kindergarten, the U.S. presently enjoys the highest immunization rate ever at 77%. Yet bubbling beneath these national numbers is the question about vaccine safety. Driven by claims that vaccinations can be associated with autism, increasing number of parents are raising questions about whether vaccines are in fact harmful to children, instead of helpful (Park, 2008). Positives for Vaccinations ... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Negative Effects of Vaccinations Essay

1392 words - 6 pages A parent can’t go a week without hearing about vaccinations and the problems they will cause our children. Generally the advertised negative effects of the vaccinations are immediate, whereas others may indicate they cause problems later in life. In the day and age of the internet, what is a person to do? Get informed. Don’t take the information that is presented to you on Facebook, Twitter, email, or through the grapevine as science. Vaccinations have become a very taboo subject for parents today. There is plenty of mis-information out there on the downsides of vaccinations, but none stand up to scientific inspection. Where has the concern about vaccinations come from? When the majority... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Do we need vaccinations? Essay

1368 words - 5 pages INTRODUCTIONI was asked to produce a case study on the topic of "Vaccinations". I was asked to come up with a question relating to the topic of Vaccinations, and the question that I came up with was "Do we need vaccinations?"Firstly, I will be finding out some background information about vaccinations and what their purpose is. I think that people should be interested in answering my question as it could apply to them and affect their health in some way.There will be two sides to my argument (for and against) of why/how we need vaccinations; so I have conducted some research form the internet, from books, and other scientific knowledge to back up each side of the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Ethics Of Optional Infant Vaccinations Essay

1131 words - 5 pages States, such as Texas, who give legal guardians the option of not vaccinating their children during the newborn-to-two-year-old period, because of the recent scare of supposed "links" between said vaccinations and autism, are unnecessarily putting not only themselves and their children, but the entire country at risk of a disease outbreak that can otherwise be avoided altogether.In the last decade or so, there has been a large movement of concerned parents, led by such celebrities as Jenny McCarthy, Jim Carrey, and Robert F. Kennedy Jr., that have pushed for states to give parents the choice on whether or not to... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccinations: The Answer to Childhood Fatalities

1105 words - 4 pages America’s parents have taken to creating vulnerable children. Wary adults are neglecting vaccinations that control preventable diseases across the country. No child should be subjected to the susceptibility of an unvaccinated immune system. In this day and age, there is no reason for parents to avoid inoculations because the once fatal health risks, financial insufficiencies, and moral qualms that once presented a reason for doubt have dwindled away. Fatal diseases such as Measles, Polio, and Tetanus are preventable through vaccination, but manage to run rampant when parents subject their children to these illnesses by failing to have them vaccinated. One of the primary reasons that... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccinations Necessary to the Nation’s Youth

1788 words - 7 pages Parents must make many decisions about their child, which vary from what brand of diapers to use to at what age to start a college fund. Parents also take responsibility for their child’s health, including deciding whether or not to vaccinate. Immunizations serve as the most efficient way to prevent possible life threatening diseases, including mumps, Hepatitis B, and polio, from affecting children, not only during adolescence, but also throughout their adult lives. Parents need to make the informed decision to vaccinate their children. If asked about the subject of immunizations, almost any medical doctor will promote vaccination as the most effective intervention of modern medicine... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccinations and Their Possible Link to Autism

1131 words - 5 pages In today’s modern world immunizations are given to children to protect their bodies from harmful diseases by creating an adaptive immune response. This adaptive response can be achieved through two methods. The first is active immunity which is achieved by injecting a patient with antigens to provoke an immune response. The second is passive immunity which involves administering antibodies in antitoxins or antisera to a patient (Bauman, 2012). The activated immune system produces a reaction which eventually causes immunologic memory and a heightened response to future exposure (Bauman, 2012). This means that the patient will be sick for a shorter period of time or that they will not become... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Debate Over Vaccinations for Adults and Children

1305 words - 5 pages A very controversial issue these days is whether or not to receive immunizations. I am a young mother and I tend to follow my mothers and doctors’ advice when it comes to mine and my children’s health, I feel as though my doctor has the best advice on how I can keep us all happy and healthy, however this is not the case for everyone. Many questions have arisen about immunizations and there are quite a few people who are either hesitant to or will not have themselves and their children immunized. I am a person who believes that children and adults should be immunized, by not receiving vaccinations it is possible to be putting the public at risk for more diseases. It should not matter what the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccinations Should be Mandatory in the State of California

2212 words - 9 pages Vaccinations should be mandatory for all children within the State of California as this will reduce the death rate associated with preventable communicably infectious diseases. Routine vaccinations during early developments have been historical proven to reduce the onset and spread of potentially infectious microbial agents. According to the Center of Disease Control and Prevention, “Vaccines have reduced some preventable infectious diseases to an all-time low, and now few people experience the devastating effects of measles, pertussis, and other illnesses (Prevention). Representatives, I’m sure that some of you in here, right now, agree that our further relies heavily... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccinations: Vaccines Should Be Mandatory For All People

1367 words - 5 pages Vaccinations are designed to help people go through their everyday life. A country doctor, Edward Jenner, who lived in Berkeley, England, first administered vaccines in 1796 (Health Affairs). Throughout history, vaccinations have become better to where they are safer for the human body. Everyone should get vaccinated against certain disease to stay healthy. Vaccines have been proven to make people immune to serious diseases (Childhood Immunization). By being vaccinated the person is not only helping themselves but others around them too. Vaccines are an important tool for preventing disease and should be mandatory for all people. Childhood vaccines protect children from a variety of... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccination Impact Throughout History

1397 words - 6 pages Although, vaccinations have been around for a long time, the great controversy surrounding the uses were substantially less when first accepted. Over time, vaccines have been created for diseases such as polio, small pox, chicken pox, the common flu; as well as being improved and continually updated. Prior to the development of vaccines, diseases were a great concern to the people due to their wide and rapid spreading. Vaccines became very popular and were believed to be essential in order to maintain a healthy society. The amount of people suffering from many of the diseases that vaccines now exist for has significantly gone down since vaccines inception. In fact, vaccines have even been... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Discovery of Vaccines Prevented The Spread of Infectious Diseases

1584 words - 6 pages The discovery of vaccines prevented the spread of infectious diseases around the world. Vaccines control the spread of diseases such as measles, tuberculosis, smallpox, and the flu. In addition, vaccines increase the overall health of not only individuals, but of populations. Although these benefits prove effective on the world wide scale, the requirement of vaccinations of children to enter the public school system remains a current public health concern. Some argue that vaccines are dangerous for children and can lead to adverse effects. Others assert that the enforcement of requiring children to be vaccinated before entering schools protects the health of those attending school. These... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Parents Should Have More Say in Vaccinating Children

2475 words - 10 pages Introduction When I became pregnant with my first child in late 1998, my life was forever changed. For the first time, I had someone else to think about, someone else to worry about. I did my best to follow the orders of the doctor the girlfriend-esque physician that I had chosen to deliver my bundle of joy. I took my prenatal vitamins and made sure that I was eating enough for two. In fact, I may have been eating for triplets during that pregnancy, as I gained a whopping 60 pounds! My daughter became the center of my universe in August of 1999. I could not imagine doing anything to put that little 8 pound 12 ounce angel face into harm’s way. Being young and naïve, I questioned... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Infant Mortality Rate-Government Policy To Blame?

1895 words - 8 pages As of 2009, the United States has been found to have one of the worst infant mortality rates among the industrialized nations, despite administering more vaccines than any other country (Goldman, 2). The cause of this serious predicament has been debated by many people. Recently, a study was published which presented an argument that indicates that infant mortality rates have a direct correlation to the number of infant deaths in industrialized nations. The intention of this paper is to show that the government policy of mandatory immunizations should be revoked until the problem has been investigated. Currently, a person can be exempt from immunizations in all 50 states for medical... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Supply and Demand: Pharmaceuticals

860 words - 3 pages Changes in Supply, Demand, and PriceIntroductionPrior to 2004, vaccinations to prevent the most common human diseases were readily available. In the 1950s, there were 26 pharmaceutical companies that made vaccines in the United States; however, by 2004 only four such companies remained. For instance, while the demand for the flu vaccine has risen sharply, the supply of the vaccine has declined; consequently, the price of the vaccine has increased. The problem has now reached widespread proportions. "Over the past three decades the vaccine infrastructure in the United States has steadily crumbled"... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Importance of Childhood Vaccination

1483 words - 6 pages Since the introduction of vaccinations, medical science has managed to all but eliminate many formally fatal and debilitating childhood illnesses in countries where the immunization of children is nearly universal. Diseases such as measles, mumps, diphtheria, rubella and polio have been relegated to a marginal status in developed countries with active immunization campaigns; smallpox is actually considered to have been completely eliminated from the earth, without a single case having been reported since roughly 1979 (“Childhood”). Largely centered around a study published in 1998 in the British medical journal “The Lancet”, there has been an upsurge in concerns of the safety of... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Importance of Childhood Vaccination

1521 words - 6 pages Since the introduction of vaccinations, medical science has managed to all but eliminate many formerly fatal and debilitating childhood illnesses in countries where the immunization of children is nearly universal. Diseases such as measles, mumps, diphtheria, rubella and polio have been relegated to a marginal status in developed countries with active immunization campaigns; smallpox is actually considered to have been completely eliminated from the earth, without a single case having been reported since roughly 1979 (“Childhood”). Largely centered around a study published in 1998 in the British medical journal “The Lancet”, there has been an upsurge in concerns of the safety of... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Religion as a Threat to Vaccination

1373 words - 5 pages Since the debut of vaccines, global health has improved as diseases become less common and, in some cases, eradicated. “Herd immunity,” the overall immunity established when a significant proportion of a community is immune to a disease, can be reached through widespread vaccination. The result of herd immunity is an extreme reduction of disease prevalence (Fine, Eames, & Heymann, 2011). Current herd immunity saves forty-two thousand lives and fourteen billion dollars in the United States each year in direct medical costs alone (Buttenheim, Jones, & Baras, 2012). Reaching the threshold number of individuals needed in order to achieve herd immunity has generally been a nonissue for... VIEW DOCUMENT
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It is Advisable that Everyone Should Get Vaccinated Against H1N1 Influenza

1048 words - 4 pages H1N1 Influenza (“Swine Flu”) is a flu pandemic that has recently spread all around the world. The Swine Flu began its massive spread through Mexico in April (2009) and by June, the World Health Organization raised the alert level to a full-blown pandemic across the globe. The virus has spread rapidly throughout the world. Luckily, the governments around the globe have offered an immunization flu shot against this pandemic that is available to some citizens at this present time. In Lawrence Gostin's “Swine Flu Vaccine: What Is Fair?” (2009), he explains his doubts for the Swine Flu vaccination by emphasizing how rich countries have a large advantage over poor countries in receiving the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccines Are Not the Cause of Autism

804 words - 3 pages For recurrent generations, there encompasses numerous controversies surrounding vaccinations for children in addition to the unfavorable reactions that may arise. The chief concerns are whether vaccinating causes serious developmental delays such as autism in children. The aim of this composition is to enlighten others that vaccinating children does not bring about autism. By means of scientific exploration along with advanced medical diagnosis in children, researchers currently recognize that the increase in autism claims are not vaccine linked. Koch (2000) affirms that, “drugmakers and health officials say there is no proof of a causal relationship among vaccinations and severe adverse... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccines Should Be Required

2339 words - 9 pages Vaccines Should Be Required In the late 18th century smallpox became a deadly epidemic, and Dr. Edward Jenner knew something needed to be done. He created the smallpox vaccine which led to vaccines becoming a public health practice. Because of the medical advancements today, vaccines have become a much safer and reliable way to prevent many of the diseases that once killed thousands and parents should be required to vaccinate their children to protect them and children around them unless existing health conditions stand in the way. Vaccines have been protecting people for thousands of years from diseases that, when become an epidemic, killed or crippled thousands. Vaccines were made to... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Debate Over Vaccination

732 words - 3 pages Getting a shot can be a scary experience for children and their parents. Vaccinations protect children from dangerous infections by introducing a weak or dead pathogen triggering the body to defend itself. Sometimes these pathogens can harm the child which makes some parents wonder if the risk is worth the reward. Two opposing articles on immunization will be analyzed to determine which argument is more successful. The first article is “Immunization Is a Question of Science, Not Faith: How I Evaluated the Immunization ‘Debate’ “, by Chanda Cooper-Warren. Her article appears on the website www.quackwatch.org, and is written with the authority of a concerned mother without any medical... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Skipping Childhood Vaccination Is Not Neglect

1204 words - 5 pages Skipping Childhood Vaccination Is Not Neglect According to The Guardian, everyday approximately 11,000 babies are born in the United States of America. From the time they are born, they are required to be immunized. In the first few hours of life, these newborns receive the Hepatitis B vaccine. There are parents however who are skeptical about the potential side effects of all the vaccines. They think that immunizations are going to harm their children by causing them to develop neurological deficits. Unfortunately, schools are putting pressure on the parents by creating mandatory vaccination requirements as part of the admission process. Although childhood vaccinations have proven to... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccines: The Best Choice for Our Children?

1489 words - 6 pages There has long been a debate about whether or not parents should take part in the recommended vaccination schedule for their children. Many parents worry about what they do not know about the vaccines. This can include concepts such as what is in the vaccine and how the vaccines themselves, or giving multiple vaccines within a short span of time, affects their children. How combination vaccines such as DTAP and MMRV affect their children’s immune systems or other body systems could be another worry of parents. Today, newborns and young children are routinely vaccinated according to an immunization schedule established in 1995 by the CDC, AAP, and AAFP (Children’s, 2013). While the many... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Reasons of why Vaccines are our Future

1930 words - 8 pages Why are parents not vaccinating their children against preventable diseases? Many infants and children are dying around the world due to preventable diseases. The parents of children in underdeveloped nations of the world are in need of vaccines. Vaccines are sent to these locations to help the people thrive. However, in the United States it is a different version, where parents demand their children not to be vaccinated. Vaccines are readily available to people, yet they refuse for many different reasons. Most of the reasons given for not vaccinating children are because of religious reasons, forgetfulness, moral beliefs, monetary issues and the theory that vaccines cause other... VIEW DOCUMENT
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MMR+Autism

2520 words - 10 pages O'Brien 1Bria O'BrienClass : Journalism Principles and PracticesProfessor: Carl HaunsmenSep 22nd-2014The Old Aged Question,Is Autism Linked To MMR?Conspiracy theories are everywhere, and they're more widely believed than many people think. The latest theory that has just recently went viral, is if the Link to Autism is caused by the MMR (Mumps, Measles, and Rubella) vaccination. The public thinks a high-ranking whistleblower revealed that the CDC (United States Centers for Disease Control... VIEW DOCUMENT
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MMR+ Autism

2520 words - 10 pages O'Brien 1Bria O'BrienClass : Journalism Principles and PracticesProfessor: Carl HaunsmenSep 22nd-2014The Old Aged Question,Is Autism Linked To MMR?Conspiracy theories are everywhere, and they're more widely believed than many people think. The latest theory that has just recently went viral, is if the Link to Autism is caused by the MMR (Mumps, Measles, and Rubella) vaccination. The public thinks a high-ranking whistleblower revealed that the CDC (United States Centers for Disease Control... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Smallpox: The Multi-Millennium Scourge

1055 words - 4 pages Smallpox: The Multi-Millennium Scourge The Encyclopedia Britannica defines scourge as a cause of wide or great affliction. Scourge has been use synonymously to describe the immense devastation the smallpox disease has had on mankind throughout history. Smallpox once plagued the entire world until the primitive inoculation methods used in southwest Asia (injecting puss and inhaling grounded scabs) proved to be highly effective with the recovery of infected people, thus reducing the overall mortality rate and preventing the further spread of the disease. Until the inoculation methods became popular in the mid 17th century, smallpox had a mortality rate of approximately 30%, which by some... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Flawed Protection

1144 words - 5 pages Having kids vaccinated is a decision every parent has to make shortly after their children are born. Most parents are led to believe there is no question about the safety of these vaccines. However there are few parents that are determined these vaccines are one of the prime factors in the cause of autism. The United States is in the midst of a tragic epidemic of autism. An analysis of the US Department of Education data from 1992-1993 in comparison to 2000-2001 indicates that there has been an average increase of 644% among all US children. (www.autismsociety.org) Recent studies in the Journal of the American Medical Association and Pediatrics have confirmed the autism epidemic is real and... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Vaccination Scandal

1378 words - 6 pages Imagine an outbreak, one of the most infectious viruses that thrives most in adolescents or infants, lets say the measles, happens in your hometown. Presumably, you and your family are all safe, for you have all been immunized. But your neighbor’s child (for now, lets say Tim) has yet to get vaccinated, and his parents refuse. Tim’s parents have strict moral values, which infringe on his ability to get the medication he genuinely needs. They believe vaccinations cause autism, vaccines do more harm than good, and by not immunizing, their kids build up a stronger immunity. Aside from the paranoia and false side effects vaccines cause, they can help to build up your immune system and are a... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Benefits of Prolonging and Separating Vaccines

2233 words - 9 pages Parents today have many concerns for the well being of their child. One big apprehension is what vaccines are being introduced into their infant’s small bodies and the many adverse reactions they cause. In our current generation, infants are injected with up to 31 vaccines just in their first year of life (CDC, 2015). Life threatening diseases are prevented with such vaccines, but parents are often left to wonder, how many of these vaccines are even necessary. Many of the vaccines are given in combinations; sometimes three or more disease fighting vaccines are given in one inoculation. There is continued clinical research to increase efficiency of these vaccines, changing the... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Flu Shot Should Not Be Mandatory

1324 words - 5 pages Should the Flu Shot Be Mandatory? Vaccines have been proclaimed by many people as one of the miracles of modern medicine. Vaccines are credited with saving thousands of lives and wiping out many contagious diseases. Recently, there has been a tremendous debate whether annual influenza vaccines should be mandatory. Influenza vaccines should be voluntary because people have the right to examine data on vaccinations and make their own informed decisions. Although people should have the freedom to choose to be vaccinated, the public needs to be educated about the personal, economical, and social benefits of receiving the influenza vaccine. In addition,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Polio Virus

781 words - 3 pages Polio Virus Introduction The polio virus which causes poliomyelitis in humans is an enterovirus which belongs to the picornavirus (small, RNA) family. Polio virus is rapid, acid-resistant, stable, highly tissue specific and consists of a single-stranded, positive RNA. Polio virus is able to reside in the throat or intestinal tract of humans. Poliomyelitis is a highly contagious infectious disease which has three strains, poliovirus 1 (PV1), PV2 and PV3. Polio virus, although rare in developed countries, can be found in many under-developed countries due to the uncommonness of vaccinations there. Polio is known as a disease of development. The oldest known record of polio is in an... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Hepatitis B Virus and Vaccination

1670 words - 7 pages The Hepatitis B Virus and Vaccination   The hepatitis B virus (HBV) has a long history of being shrouded in mystery concerning its cause and transmission and the treatment of its resulting symptoms and diseases. As more was learned about the virus in the first half of this century, it came to be identified largely with homosexuals and intravenous drug users. Due to its prevalence among such already marginalized members of society, hepatitis B was viewed as a highly stigmatized disease and further research concerning HBV was not a top priority in the United States. However, these sentiments have changed somewhat in the past several decades, due in part to the spread of HBV to a wider,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Understanding the Importance of Immunisation

2413 words - 10 pages Understanding the Importance of Immunisation According to http://www.amfar.org/cgi-bin/iowa/bridge.html, immunisation is the administration of antigenic components of an infectious agent to stimulate a protective immune response. Immunisation is a technique that is used to increase immunity to specific diseases in humans by exposing the individual to an anti-gen in order to raise ant-bodies to that anti-gen. Immunisation is a way of protecting against serious diseases such as tuberculosis and polio. According to the World Health Organisation diseases such as pandemic flu can come back easily. Once someone's immunised their bodies will be able to fight... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Autism

1563 words - 6 pages In April 1999, Mary Gorman wrote the following:"I hear a mother complaining about her child talking back to her and think...I wish my child could talk. I see two brothers play tag at the park and think...I wish my child could do that. I hear a mother complain about her daughter's choice of wardrobe and think...I wish my child could choose and dress himself. I see my son line up his legos, and think...I wish he could build something with them."A mother of a nine-year old autistic child wrote this passage.Every child born in the US is supposed to get a variety of vaccinations in the first... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Evaluation of Vaccination Programs and Quarantine in Australia

1857 words - 7 pages Vaccination and how it prevents infectionVaccination, or immunisation, is the process of making people resistant to infection caused by a pathogen. It involves the giving of an injection or an oral dose of a vaccine that produces immunity either actively or passively. Active immunisation involves the injection of an antigen in the form of a vaccine. The production of antibodies and T and B memory cells specific to that type or antigens are stimulated and remain in the body for a long period of time. Passive immunity is the injection of antibodies that another organism has produced in response to a particular pathogen. However this does not provide long-term immunity.Disease ... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Autisim

1686 words - 7 pages Autism is a very complex brain disorder that affects 1 in 68 children in the United States. (What is Autism?, n.d.) Autism can have many symptoms, however, the larger symptoms include: social challenges, communication difficulties, repetitive behaviors, genetic disorders, seizure disorders, sleep dysfunctions, sensory processing problems, and pica. Since Autism affects so many children and has such a drastic list of symptoms associated with it, many parents, teachers, and medical professionals want to know what causes autism and how can we prevent and/or cure autism, or should we even cure autism. This has been and will probably be a hot topic for a good time or at least until everyone can... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Influenza Vaccination Debate

2331 words - 9 pages Mandatory Influenza Vaccinations for healthcare providers can be a controversial topic for some and may propose a challenge to some provider’s ethical values and beliefs. The topic of mandatory vaccination for influenza (“flu”) has been widely studied and debated among professionals over several years. It is apparent that there is some movement towards a mandatory vaccination for influenza by healthcare institutions as the benefit out weighs the risk on several fronts. “Influenza infection is associated with 36,000 excess deaths and > 200,000 hospitalizations in the United States annually. It is the leading cause of vaccine-preventable death in the United States every year” (Babcock,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Vaccines for Children

2482 words - 10 pages Introduction Starting in late 1994, the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program is a major privilege program that provides states with free vaccines for disadvantaged children. These vaccines are supplied by clinics and doctors that essentially register for the VFC program. By providers registering for the program, these clinics and doctors’ offices must conform to certain standards set by VFC as well as the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) (Richard Kent Zimmerman, 2001). Overview of the program The Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program helps providing the appropriate vaccines to children whose parents or caregiver may not necessarily be able to afford or maintain appropriate... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Decisions in Paradise III

2579 words - 10 pages Stewart Title of � PAGE \* MERGEFORMAT �7� Running head: STEWART TITLE OF KAVA IIIStewart Title of Kava IIIEden JackUniversity of Phoenix��Stewart Title of Kava IIIThe decision to bring Stewart Title to Kava has taken tactical planning and a series of logical decisions and choices. I have taken real issues that impact the success of making and implementing a decision. I have looked at the implications from financial and practical angles and have decided on the best course of action. By using the principles of decision making for finding a solution to the problem, making the decision by... VIEW DOCUMENT
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The Medical Similarities Between Dogs and People.

1777 words - 7 pages Even though animals and humans are of different species, there are definite similarities in their behavior and health care. Dogs, like humans, require periodic health checkups. Additionally, dogs, like babies, cannot verbalize their pains. However, changes in behavior, such as: lack of appetite, tiredness, crying, and lack of energy are indications to their owners or parents that something is wrong or bothering them. There are many examples that can illustrate these parallels in human and canine life. These comparisons are evident practically from birth.Puppies instinctively breast-feed. Their mother's first milk, called colostrum (thin yellowish fluid filled with protein,... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Rhetorical Analysis - Just Say No To Flu Vaccines

1162 words - 5 pages Just Say No! The title of the article written by a blogger and newsman named Harry Fuller who writes to share his personal truths about the government's involvement in the administration of flu vaccinations. The purpose of the article is to persuade anyone with the ability to make a decision about vaccinations for themselves or their dependents to "Just Say No" to getting the flu vaccine and to be concerned about government control. To accomplish this, Fuller uses sarcasm with logos... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism

3216 words - 13 pages Vaccines have been used to prevent diseases for centuries, and have saved countless lives of children and adults. The smallpox vaccine was invented as early as 1796, and since then the use of vaccines has continued to protect us from countless life threatening diseases such as polio, measles, and pertussis. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2010) assures that vaccines are extensively tested by scientist to make sure they are effective and safe, and must receive the approval of the Food and Drug Administration before being used. “Perhaps the greatest success story in public health is the reduction of infectious diseases due to the use of vaccines” (CDC, 2010). Routine... VIEW DOCUMENT
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Ethics

2561 words - 10 pages IntroductionBiotechnical advances in vaccine therapy hold the promise of eradicating debilitating and life threatening diseases. The new human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is just one such example. This vaccine specifically targets the most dangerous carcinogenic genotypes and other HPV vaccines in development may even be capable reversing disease in those already infected (Kirchheimer, 2005). Currently, researchers are developing vaccines against prostate cancer, HIV, melanoma, avian influenza, and diabetes, to name a few (Kirchheimer). Public health has embraced this recent resurgence in vaccine therapy for both... VIEW DOCUMENT
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National Influenza Immunization Program - The Swine Flu of 1976

4026 words - 16 pages In 1976, due to an outbreak of influenza at Fort Dix, New Jersey, the United States set a precedent in immunology by attempting to vaccinate the entire population of the country against the possibility of a swine-type Influenza A epidemic. While a great many people were successfully immunized in a very short period of time, the National Influenza Immunization Program (NIIP) quickly became recognized as a failure, one reason being that the feared epidemic never surfaced at all. But this massive undertaking deserves more analysis than just a simple repudiation. For example, all evidence linked to the pathology, microbiology, and historical cycle of influenza and the outbreak at Fort Dix... VIEW DOCUMENT
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AIDS a manmade disease or not, what the US Government doesn't want you to know.

733 words - 3 pages AIDS by modest estimation can be characterized as the 21st Century answer to the plague. The question most inevitably arises upon whether or not the virus that causes AIDS, HIV, was man made or a natural outbreak. Religious thinkers point to the ever worsening moral landscape of society that brought on God's wrath in the form of AIDS. Conspiracy Theorists however point to the many hearsay rumors from former Fort Detrick workers that AIDS was created as the ultimate biological weapon and was tested on gays and the African American Drug Using population. Upon all this speculation one thing about AIDS is made abundantly clear, and that is there is still no published cure for it yet and it... VIEW DOCUMENT
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INOCULATION TO DISABILITY AND DEATH

2531 words - 10 pages Scientific evidence demonstrates that vaccine inoculation can cause complications including disability and death. What is causing this shift in immune-prophylaxis, from the initial goal of eradicating contagious diseases, to becoming a killer inoculation? Are we still free to defend and decide for our health, or is there a danger of government actions with mass- vaccination mandates? There is a justified alarming concern on vaccines, not only in the population worldwide, but also in the medical personnel. The theory stated in some scientific groups, is that vaccines are not only harmful but also useless. In matter of health issues, science is the only honest filter we can use, looking at... VIEW DOCUMENT
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History and Eradication of Smallpox

2375 words - 10 pages History and Eradication of Smallpox The smallpox virus has affected the human species for centuries. It has been recorded as early as 1350 BC in ancient Egypt.The smallpox disease is caused by the Variola virus which only inhabits the human organism. There are two forms of the disease major and minor. The major has a mortality rate of 20-40% of untreated individuals. Though major and minor eventually run the same course and the outcome is the same, the major has symptoms that are distinct from the minor form, including hemorrhaging both internally and externally. Early treatment of the disease was variolation, and was the only method of treatment until the vaccine was discovered by Edward... VIEW DOCUMENT