War on Drugs Essay Examples

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War on Drugs Essay

783 words - 3 pages Hieu Joseph NguyenJS 1213/2/14War on DrugsThe War on Drugs started in 1971 by President Richard Nixon. 35 years over a million nonviolent drug offenders were put behind bars. Americans allowed this war on drugs because we don't know better. This war on drugs was a profit scheme set up by the government. The media convinced society to believe that drugs are the number one enemy. What isn't advertise is that the government are the ones responsible for supplying these drugs. Compared to the war on terrorism, war on drugs is far more costly. There are other solutions to VIEW DOCUMENT
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The War On Drugs Essay

581 words - 2 pages The “War on Drugs” is the name given to the battle of prohibition that the United States has been fighting for over forty years. And it has been America’s longest war. The “war” was officially declared by President Richard Nixon in the 1970’s due to the abuse of illegitimate drugs. Nixon claimed it as “public enemy number one” and enacted laws to fight the importation of narcotics. The United States’ War on Drugs began in response to cocaine trafficking in the late 1980’s. As the war continues to go on, winning it hardly seems feasible. As stated by NewsHour, the National Office of Drug Control Policy spends approximately nineteen billion dollars a year trying to stop the drug trade. The VIEW DOCUMENT
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war on drugs Essay

1551 words - 6 pages The war on drugs is not a war that can be fought on the beaches of Normandy or in the jungles of Vietnam. It is a war fought in the backyards of all Americans, every day. This is a war that cannot be won with the aid of nuclear weapons or the help of any other forms of artillery. The number of casualties, however, will be determined by whether or not the legalization of drugs occurs. Many will suffer the same outcome as a soldier killed in battle if drugs become legal.      If marijuana and other drugs are legalized, obtaining drugs will be easier for people of all ages. With the increased use of drugs, there are bound to be more traffic accidents resulting from VIEW DOCUMENT
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The War on Drugs Essay

1524 words - 6 pages Despite an estimated $1 trillion spent by the United States on the “War on Drugs”, statistics from the US Department of Justice (2010) has confirmed that the usage of drugs has not changed over the past 10 years. Approximately $350 billion is spent per year on the “war on drugs”, only $7 billion is spent on prevention programs by the federal government. The war on drugs is more heavily focused on how to fight crime, instead of how to prevent it. Crime prevention methods may not be immediate, but it is the most efficient and effective long-term. Not only is the war on drugs costly, it is also ineffective at reducing or eliminating trade and usage. The “War on Drugs” campaign has been VIEW DOCUMENT
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War on Drugs Essay

4022 words - 16 pages Drugs for PeacePerspectives Involving the "War on Drugs" and Related MovementsUpon given the task of investigating a social cause, I designated the War on Drugs, a moral reform, to my topic of interest. The war on drugs is simply defined as reducing illegal production, use, and distribution of what the government systems regard as illegal grade substances. There are many ongoing considerations for medical, spiritual, and recreational standings (for many drugs, like marijuana, opium, cocaine, and psychedelics) under high debate, constantly being changed, and something I've always had speculated ideas concerning. Through discussing and gaining knowledge on the stages, debates VIEW DOCUMENT
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The War on Drugs Essay

1794 words - 7 pages Throughout U.S governmental history, policies have been known to affect the way of life and every aspect. The topic it choose to research is about “The War on Drugs”, the impact policies have on society and if it does help the public or tend to extent social inequality. This topic is very important to me in the sense that, I look at the community I live and see how drugs have affected people lifes, broken up families and also destroyed the community itself. I wanted to know if the “war on drugs” stop our neighborhood from being flooded with drugs or it just over shadow the real problems that needs to be tackled. It is also very important for people to know about this topic because the VIEW DOCUMENT
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The War on Drugs Essay

2969 words - 12 pages found out, getting high. You yourself have to make an effort, or no good will come.The war on drugs is growing, and something incredible has to be completed to make it deteriorate. I think the resolution is to get people out and educate. Enlighten people on what they are doing to themselves. Tell them that in twenty years they may have no brain, tell them that they may have problems conceiving children, and that they could in all probability die the next time they put something in their body like this. Let them know the truth. Those television and magazine ads called Truth are letting the public know how bad smoking is. There is no reason why there can't be ads like the "Truth" ones VIEW DOCUMENT
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America's War on Drugs Essay

5904 words - 24 pages In 1968, President Richard Nixon initiated the War on Drugs when American soldiers were coming home from the Vietnam War addicted to heroin. More than a decade later, President Ronald Reagan launches the South Florida Drug Task force, headed by then Vice-President George Bush, in response to the city of Miami’s demand for help. In 1981, Miami was the financial and import central for cocaine and marijuana, and the residents were fed up. Thanks to the task force, drug arrests went up by 27%, and drug seizures went up by 50%. With that, the need for prosecutors and judges also rose. Despite these increased arrests and seizures, marijuana and cocaine still poured into south Florida. At this VIEW DOCUMENT
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The War on Drugs Essay

3377 words - 14 pages The War on Drugs To fully understand the significance and the seriousness of a War one must first fully understand the reasons that caused it in the first place. In this specific case the solution begins with several important yet seemingly simple questions…What is marijuana? How is it used? And why is it so coveted and widely distributed in Jamaica as well as the rest of the world?… All these questions help clarify the reasoning behind the war on drugs and further investigation shows how Jamaica ends up being an important country in this puzzle as well. Lets begin with the first question, (What is marijuana), of course the dictionary definition is simply put,-a preparation of the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Stop the War on Drugs Essay

1972 words - 8 pages Ever wonder why the United States is building more prisons than schools or why the United States has the largest inmate population in the world even though the U.S. accounts for 5% of the world population or why gang violence is increasing? The War on Drugs has been the cause of major casualties in our society. Most of the casualties are innocent people or drug users whose life has been greatly impacted by the War. This prohibition of drugs is the cause of many problems that plague our society. The War on Drugs has failed in many different aspects in our society, and the War on Drugs VIEW DOCUMENT
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Prohibition Vs War On Drugs

1032 words - 4 pages In the nineteen twenties America was embroiled in a dark age, borne of a dangerous brew of politically minded churches, overly ardent politicians, and public apathy. The "dark age" of prohibition, one of America's greatest blunders, bears striking resemblance to the modern "War on Drugs." These two abridgments share not only similar aims, and methods, but were borne of similar circumstances, by similar forces. Studies by eminent doctors and scientists, from Dr. Samuel Allentuck, to Mr. Herbery Asbury, have come to the conclusion that both prohibition, and the "War on Drugs have been brought about by overly zealous politicians. Most say that the politicians had a fundamental VIEW DOCUMENT
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War on Drugs Should Focus on Traffickers

669 words - 3 pages WAR ON DRUGS SHOULD FOCUS ON TRAFFICKERS The War on Drugs is a never-ending struggle that appears to have no end. The problem with fighting the supply and demand sides of the war is that the suppliers often do not appear to play by the same rules of engagement. In order for the United States to successfully battle the War on Drugs, the focus should be centered on activities within American borders.      When the United States declared the War on Drugs, there was an assumption that other nations wanted to fight the war along side. The fact is that there are many nations that endorse the drug trade and seek to gain profit off of the illicit business. The Andean VIEW DOCUMENT
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The War On Drugs in the USA

855 words - 3 pages The War On Drugs in the USA One of the most explosive issues in the current American political climate is illegal drug use. Drug abuse is intimately connected to problems like crime, economic discrimination, and race relations, and is a topic of great controversy for many Americans. The campaign to stamp out illegal drug use is called the “war on drugs” because it pinpoints the need to crack down on drug dealers, arrest users, and generally pursue an VIEW DOCUMENT
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America’s War on Drugs vs. Legalization

3570 words - 14 pages America’s War on Drugs vs. Legalization The United States has spent over 30 years fighting the war on drugs. Americans have paid a heavy price financially. The drug enforcement budget is now $40 billion. A lot of time, effort, and money go into America’s attempt in eliminating trafficking, dealing, and the use of illegal drugs. Many believe that this is a war worth fighting, while others feel that America will never conquer the war on drugs. The latter suggest legalization as an alternative plan that will help save the country millions of dollars. In this paper, I will examine the history of the drug war as well as the arguments for and against fighting the war on drugs VIEW DOCUMENT
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Underdeveloped Countries and the War on Drugs

3729 words - 15 pages Underdeveloped Countries and the War on Drugs With the presidential election peering around the corner, it is time to bring back an age-old topic which has been troubling United States citizens for decades, the War on Drugs. Politicians have long quarreled over what sort of action should be taken to combat the world’s drug problems, and it is time that this issue surfaces again. Despite increased efforts from every government faction imaginable, the drug problem subsists, if not worsens. The market for cops and criminals in the drug war fields has not made any noticeable progress within the last 20 years (Kapczynski). Perhaps with the turn of the tide and hopefully a change of VIEW DOCUMENT
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Against the War On Drugs in America

3523 words - 14 pages The Case Against America’s War on Drugs The legal prohibition on most psychoactive drugs has been in place in this country for the better part of a century. This policy of prohibition, however, has never been based on reason or careful consideration, but on the paranoia of a small segment of society and the indifferent willingness of the majority to accept this vocal minority’s claims without question. Outlawing any use of a particular drug is a violation of the basic freedom of individuals to act as they please in their private lives. However, even if one does not accept this belief, an objective analysis of the United States’ history of prohibition clearly shows that attempts to VIEW DOCUMENT
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War on Drugs and Prison Overcrowding

712 words - 3 pages University of Phoenix Criminal Justice Administration CJA 453 Juan Campos February 5, 2009War on Drugs and Prison Overcrowding Prison overcrowding is a major problem1in our criminal justice system and it continues to bea hotly debated topic as to how we should address the problem. One of the main reasons our prison systems have a problem with overcrowding is drugs. More specifically, the "war on drugs" started by President Reagan in 1982 brought a dramatic increase1to the number of people put behind barsfor drug offenses VIEW DOCUMENT
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Pablo Escobar and the War on drugs

4154 words - 17 pages Throughout history the United States has been known widely for its ruthlessness and will to win as far as war is concerned. From the Spanish-American war to the World Wars, the United States has always come out on top. The United States has the always had the reputation that "we simply refuse to lose". However, one war that the United States has constantly struggled to be "on top of" is the War on Drugs.This war seems to be a never ending battle. The fact that the demand for illicit drugs has increasingly VIEW DOCUMENT
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Analysis of the War on Drugs

3507 words - 14 pages in order to make wrongful decisions or assist in negative actions. The War on Drugs has been a highly contentious issue since its inception. In California, for example, possessing more than 28.5 grams of marijuana- with an estimated street value of $350-$400 is subject to a misdemeanor, 6 months imprisonment, and a fine of $500. The cost of housing an inmate arrested and convicted for non-violent drug related offenses such as this will cost the state anywhere from $10-27,000 a year. This shows that some individuals are greatly being charged for something that is not as significant or big of an issue, which is extremely unfair and unjust (it is also affecting society in many different ways VIEW DOCUMENT
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Criminal Law and The War on Drugs

1778 words - 7 pages Criminal Law and The War on Drugs      "These records of wars, intrigues, factions, and revolutions, are so many collections of experiments, by which the politician or moral philosopher fixes the principles of his science, in the same manner as the physician or natural philosopher becomes acquainted with the nature of plants, minerals, and other external objects, by the experiments which he forms concerning them." (David Hume.)2   "Our long armed and hairy ancestors had no idea of redress beyond vengeance, or of justice beyond mere individual reprisal."3   To determine what constitutes criminal law, is, as one learned judge has opined, "a work of art, it is something VIEW DOCUMENT
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The War on Drugs is a War on the Poor

1252 words - 5 pages      The “War on Drugs" has been so terribly ineffective that it leads one to question its true motives. Even a dog can eventually learn from an electric fence, so why not the United States government? Is the goal really to curtail drug use, or is it to segregate society and vilify the disadvantaged? A combination of mandatory minimum sentencing and other unjust laws has led to an enormous rise in U.S. prison populations. Thanks to these laws, 60 percent of the federal prison population consisted of nonviolent drug offenders as of 1999. In 1997, about twice as many people were arrested for drug offenses as for violent crimes. As a result, the U.S. incarceration rate is now six to VIEW DOCUMENT
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War on Drugs: Germany compared to the Netherlands

955 words - 4 pages The War on Drugs One of the key aspects to consider when evaluating domestic political actors preferences towards policies pertaining to illegal drug use in both the Netherlands and Germany is to evaluate their ideological differences. The Netherlands attitude towards drug policy revolves around limiting the negative impacts illegal drug use has on society by implementing laws catered towards decriminalization. On the other hand, Germany considers drugs a detriment to society and promotes legislation that proactively restricts the flow of supply and demand of illegal drugs within the country. Now that both countries ideological differences have been brought to light, we must also consider VIEW DOCUMENT
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"War on Drugs" described from the Radical Theory of Sociology.

683 words - 3 pages "War on Drugs"The war on drugs has cost the U.S. billions of dollars in the last decade, and millions are also spent on media campaigns to educate and try to scare young people from using drugs. None of these campaigns against drugs have proven successful. Also tougher laws and legislation have given longer and harsher prison sentences for those who use or deal drugs. These tough sentences have been given with the hope that it will detour others from getting involved with drugs in any way, but that has obviously not worked in any way. All this has done is filling up our already overcrowded prisons and VIEW DOCUMENT
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The US War on Drugs in Latin America

3546 words - 14 pages The US War on Drugs in Latin America Introduction The United States has a long history of intervention in the affairs of one it’s southern neighbor, Latin America. The war on drugs has been no exception. An investigation of US relations with Latin America in the period from 1820 to 1960, reveals the war on drugs to be a convenient extension of an almost 200 year-old policy. This investigation focuses on the commercial and political objectives of the US in fighting a war on drugs in Latin America. These objectives explain why the failing drug policy persisted despite its overwhelming failure to decrease drug production or trafficking. These objectives also explain why the US has VIEW DOCUMENT
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The War on Drugs: Failures of the Drug Law

1751 words - 7 pages , with the marijuana and heroin business each providing over seven billion dollars, and the cocaine business over thirteen billion (Nanedlman 1988). Another way that the war on drugs is establishing more widespread violent activities is the daunting and corrupting conduct of the dug dealers. These forbidden markets mostly attract criminal minded people and usually these people resolve their disputes violently amongst themselves rather than reporting to the legal authorities. During the drug ban, intense confrontations occur between gangs and stealing of drugs laden trucks and ships are recurrent and tarnished incidences. Moreover, the usage of booby traps in marijuana fields, the hunt of pirates VIEW DOCUMENT
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Is Legalization a Realistic Alternative to the War on Drugs?

4811 words - 19 pages For years, the issue of legalization has been an increasingly controversial subject. Millions of dollars are spent annually in the War on Drugs causing many to wonder if this fight is cost-effective or if an alternative such as legalization would be more realistic than current efforts in drug prevention. Opponents' state that with legalization would come an increase not only in availability, but also with everything associated with that availability. This includes suffering of users and their loved ones, death of users and innocent alike, increases in health-care costs, cost to employers, drug-related crimes, and increases in various other social, economic, and emotional costs. On the VIEW DOCUMENT
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Success and Failure in the US-Mexico War on Drugs

3266 words - 13 pages their demand exists. A 1997 article stated that narcotics funnel as much as $30 billion into the Mexican economy each year, “more than the country’s top two legitimate exports combined.”[1] Despite decades of attempts to control this illegal activity, the public perception is that the United States’ war on drugs has failed to substantially reduce both the supply and demand of illegal drugs. Supply-side efforts have been plagued by conflicting political priorities and corruption in both American and Mexican administrations, while the costly anti-drug advertising campaigns and increased incarcerations of drug users have had only limited success in decreasing the demand for VIEW DOCUMENT
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Assignment 3: Video Analysis, "Prisoners of the War on Drugs"

723 words - 3 pages Assignment 3: Video Analysis, "Prisoners of the War on Drugs" After watching " Prisoners of the War on Drugs I decided to write my analysis on two inmates by the names of Ralph Sowell and Michael Jones aka Snowball. Ralph Sowell was incarcerated for selling drugs. Ralph said since he has been in prison, his money has tripled. He is now making anywhere from $3500 to $4500 dollars a week. His way of getting the drugs in prison, is through his visitors or through the dirty cops that work in the prison. In my opinion, I believe that the labeling theory VIEW DOCUMENT
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Education is the Best Weapon in the War on Drugs

2639 words - 11 pages Education is the Best Weapon in the War on Drugs It seems that in the ongoing debate over whether to legalize drugs in the United States, quite a few people feel that legalization would diminish the crime rate. Their argument points out that the permissible use of marijuana would eliminate the necessity for people to go into hard drug territories to purchase such a drug and maybe even deter them from trying narcotics like crack-cocaine and heroin. Even though these people assert that legalization could diminish crime rate, they forget to realize that alcohol and nicotine are legal psychoactive drugs and have detrimental hazards VIEW DOCUMENT
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The War on Drugs and U.S. Foreign Policy

4308 words - 17 pages Introduction The War on Drugs has been a common phrase in the United States for many decades. What exactly does this mean and how does it shape U.S. foreign policy? The War on Drugs can be defined as the systematic and aggressive policy that is determined to undermine and stop the flow of illegal drugs into the United States. This policy is backed by several U.S. institutions including the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), U.S. Army, U.S. Coast Guard, and U.S. Customs. Also, included in this list are the numerous local law enforcement agencies across the country. The U.S. government has instituted the VIEW DOCUMENT
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War on Drugs Causes the Viloation of Individual Rights

823 words - 3 pages Everyone knows the parable of the emperor with no clothes. The significance of a child being the one to point out the emperor's nudity, as opposed to a sermonizing preacher or self-righteous intellectual, is simple to understand. Neither morality nor logic was responsible for stripping the emperor's veil of falsehood. All it took was the truth. One can't help but think of this when considering Gary Johnson, the Republican governor of New Mexico, who, despite pressure from power brokers at the top of his own party, has proclaimed that the emperor that is this country's war on drugs is not only naked to the world, but that its body is festering with the sores of moral decay and corruption VIEW DOCUMENT
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Underage Drinking: The Battle Within The War On Drugs

2651 words - 11 pages Underage Drinking: The Hidden Battle Within the War on Drugs All of America is aware that we are in an everyday fight against illegal drugs, alcohol abuse, and tobacco. Billboards are filled with campaigns for a "Drug-free America" and the airwaves are filled with as many anti-smoking ads as there are commercials on television telling us to "˜think when we drink." Only recently, however, have we seen signs of campaigns VIEW DOCUMENT
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Economics Theory and Crime. Why do criminals commit crime. Why is law enforcement failing in the war on drugs.

568 words - 2 pages scale" show us that criminal organizations would be smaller in scale than average lawful businesses in other markets. Studies by Reuter and Rubenstein seem to confirm that indeed "criminal firms are relatively small... and decentralized, exactly the opposite of what we see in movies and novels." Rather than being organized, the criminal market is more of a "network of individuals that cooperate ...and do things for each other to their own mutual [economic] interest."Examining the "War on Drugs" approach we find that from an economic standpoint the "objective is to reduce the supply of illegal drugs" making them more costly and less affordable for consumption. One of the current strategies VIEW DOCUMENT
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Should the "war" on drugs continue to be fought the same way? Three reasons for and three reasons against, with critiques of both.

649 words - 3 pages The War on DrugsThe United States has continuously been fighting a losing war on drugs, spending billions of dollars and imprisoning seemingly innocent individuals. There is minimal evidence that drug use and possession has decreased because of what our government has spent on the war. Many valid points have been brought up by various professionals on whether or not this battle should continue to be fought in the same way, and what benefits and disadvantages legalizing certain drugs could bring our society.First, there VIEW DOCUMENT
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drugs

1112 words - 4 pages Work CitiedJohnson, Paul. "The War On Drugs: A Defining Moment." Forbes 191.4 (2013): 34. Business Source Elite. Web. 15 Apr. 2014."End The Drug War's Research Bans." Scientific American 310.2 (2014): 10. Business Source Elite. Web. 15 Apr. 2014.Zabludovsky, Karla. "WHO's FIGHTING YOUR DRUG WARS? (Cover Story)." Newsweek Global 162.9 (2014): 7-22. Business Source Elite. Web. 15 Apr. 2014.Green, Sara Jean. "Early Gang Participation Makes Lasting Mark." The Seattle Times. 26 Mar. 2014: n.p. SIRS Issues Researcher. Web. 15 Apr. 2014.Alexsandria JonesEnglish Comp-1Mr. HDrugsDrugs have been used for VIEW DOCUMENT
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Drugs

1964 words - 8 pages stayed away from threatening risks. There isn't always an immediate correlation between risk factors and drug dependence and uneducated persons on the matter have to stop using it a scapegoat without proper evidence.The war on drugsThe war on drugs is a campaign set by the United States government and the goal is to obliterate prohibited drug use. It was launched by former president Richard Nixon and unfortunately left many families destitute. "Over the last four decades, the US has committed more than $1 trillion to the war on drugs. However, the crackdown has failed to produce the desired results: the effort hasn't significantly decreased drug use, and it didn't cause drug VIEW DOCUMENT
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Drugs

2976 words - 12 pages by cocaine addicts.Amphetamines are stimulant drugs which were developed originally as antihistamines. They were developed in Germany and were used by troops on both sides in World War II to stay awake and alert. Like cocaine, amphetamines give the user energy, pleasure and self-confidence. Because of this, in the 1950's, amphetamines were tried as a treatment for depression. While amphetamines did make the depressed person temporarily feel better, in the long run amphetamines made their depression much worst. Amphetamines have been used by students to help them study and learn, by athletes to improve performance, by musicians to motivate themselves to perform repetitive concerts, by VIEW DOCUMENT
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Debate On Drugs

535 words - 2 pages The debate over drugs continues to disturb the American public. Many Americans take at face value the assumptions that drugs cause addiction, which leads to crime, and that addiction is an illness. Yet abundant evidence exits to support the view that legalizing illegal drugs can help solve the drug problem in America. Hi, my name is Evan Dana. Today I am going to discuss why legalizing illegal drugs can help this appalling problem that we face today in U.S. society. Let's begin by accepting a fact: drugs are everywhere in America. The fabled "War on Drugs" hasn't made a dent in the problem, even though we arrest people and stuff them into prisons as fast as we can build them VIEW DOCUMENT
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Drugs legalization

533 words - 2 pages step in legislative. The biggest problem on the drug market is untaxed money earned by criminal organizations, and billions of dollars, spending by Criminal Justice System, to fight with drugs. Gary E Johnson, former Governor of New Mexico, in his article in Washington Time presents that the estimated value of drugs market is nearly four hundred billion dollars a year. Moreover, war on drugs costs all tax-payers in the United States $50 billion a year. So, how do you think, who is the biggest supporter of drug prohibition? There are mafia and drug dealers. Why? If we legalize drugs, they will lose their huge and untaxed profits.As we can see on the statistics, provided by James VIEW DOCUMENT
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Legalise drugs ?

5581 words - 22 pages surveillance of this kind can remove drug offenders from their control, so they have become more permissive. Presently the law allows official cautions for a first offence involving cannabis. Cohen believes that if the UK police were allowed to follow the Netherlands police then their workload would be a lot lighter and the prisons less populated. In 2001, 131,090 people were cautioned for drug offences in the U.K. In 2002, there were 137,040 recorded drug offences. With numbers of recorded drug users falling to 102,600 in 2001.Police caution figures show since 1997 cautions are at 12% 1997 and have remained static being cautioned (Ahmed & Mwenda.2004)Examining the 'War on Drugs VIEW DOCUMENT
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Decriminalization of Drugs

1409 words - 6 pages Nadelman first states that the “Global War on Drugs can be Won.” Needless to say, the “Drug-Free World” and “Alcohol-Free World” are viewed as completely different realistic goals in which one could achieve. Drug-Free World would be a lot harder task for one to accomplish due to the number of addicts who are incapable of stopping, even if it continues to kill their bodies. Drug use has been a bigger problem than alcohol use, mainly because it is harming the human bodies of all races with dangerous diseases. Alcohol, on the other hand, may cause a bit of damage to the body (in severe cases, alcohol poisoning), but not merely as the damage brought upon by the drug usage. Therefore, a Drug-Free VIEW DOCUMENT
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Drugs and Alcohol

1086 words - 4 pages Drugs and Alcohol For nearly 85 years, the government has prohibited pscychoactive drugs. American leaders attempted to do the same to alcohol with Prohibition in the 1920?s. In any society, drug use plays a part in the people?s culture. Whether it be a native taking hallucinogens for a religious ceremony, a destitute alcoholic drinking on a city street, or a group of teenagers smoking marijuana, drugs and alcohol have the same effects in any culture. The question of ?why do people use drugs? has been a dilemma which American medical experts and government leaders have fought to answer for years. Recently, many institutions and organizations have formed in order to fight the war on drugs VIEW DOCUMENT
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Legalization of All Drugs

1827 words - 7 pages drugs can help solve the drug problem in America. There is not a way to stop drug use, however there are two ways to combat the problem, like we have been or to legalize them, the legalization of drugs would help the United States in the areas of crime, increase revenue, elevate over-crowed prisons and decelerate the use of drugs in American society. There is one fact society agrees on: drugs are everywhere in America. The so-called “War on drugs” has taken over the streets, back alleys, and the suburbs of America. It has caused a problem that mirrors the prohibition days of the 1920’s and early 1930’s. A Fact that alcohol prohibition did fail and the prohibition on drugs is not only VIEW DOCUMENT
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Legalization of Drugs Argument

2996 words - 12 pages assault. The reason we are unable to devote these resources where they are needed is because we are foolishly spending them on a battle that we cannot win-the "War on Drugs." Prior to Ronald Reagan's "War on Drugs," America's crime rate had been declining. Since the introduction of the new wave drug laws, violent crimes have increased 32% between 1976 and 1985. Eighty percent of all violent street crimes are now drug related. Most of the violent crime associated with drugs can be traced directly to the drug dealers and not the users. "The 'war on drugs' drives up prices, which attracts more people to the drug trade. When potential profit increases, drug dealers resort to greater VIEW DOCUMENT
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Drugs and alcohol

1043 words - 4 pages Drugs and AlcoholFor nearly 85 years, the government has prohibited pscychoactive drugs. American leaders attempted to do the same to alcohol with Prohibition in the 1920?s. In any society, drug use plays a part in the people?s culture. Whether it be a native taking hallucinogens for a religious ceremony, a destitute alcoholic drinking on a city street, or a group of teenagers smoking marijuana, drugs and alcohol have the same effects in any culture. The question of ?why do people use drugs? has been a dilemma which American medical experts and government leaders have fought to answer for years. Recently, many institutions and organizations have formed in order to fight the war on VIEW DOCUMENT
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Nightclubs and Drugs

1590 words - 6 pages Cultural beliefs, expectations, and ideals - how they contribute to drug use.Why they cause certain anti-drug efforts to failThe extermination of illegal drugs has always been one of our mostimportant, worldwide issues. Ending the existence of drugs is one of thetoughest and most complicated goals we face. Despite our constant battleagainst them, illegal substances continue to exist and thrive in our culture.With all the effort we put into the war against drugs, why is there little VIEW DOCUMENT
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Drugs in Professional Sports

2102 words - 8 pages caught, which allows them to "try" the drug. The Player's Associations, which represents both professional sports leagues, have already established well-written rules on the usage of drugs and when they will be tested, but the fact is that these rules are outdated and illustrate a negative opinion on the implications of taking drugs and thus there is no enforcement. The lack of effort put by player's associations not only depicts a negative image upon themselves, but it also allows players to play in the professional sports league, virtually undetected of any illegal substances. A fine example of this "unnoticed drug-use" is found in one-time baseball home run record holder, VIEW DOCUMENT
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Drugs Should be Legalized

5032 words - 20 pages , while being ineffective, if not, at times, counterproductive. Today, we can see the unforeseen costs of the "Drug Prohibition," and we should consider these costs before expanding the "War on Drugs."      First, among the costs of the "War on Drugs," the most obvious is monetary cost. The direct cost of purchasing drugs for private use is $100 billion a year. The federal government spends at least $10 billion a year on drug enforcement programs and spends many billions more on drug-related crimes and punishment. The estimated cost to the United States for the "War on Drugs" is $200 billion a year or an outstanding $770 per VIEW DOCUMENT
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Should Drugs Be Decriminalized?

2236 words - 9 pages users’ drug habits. Decriminalization will save taxpayers a large amount of money because of arresting, prosecuting, and incarcerating fewer people for drug use and possession (Lang, 2013). The number of prisoners has risen “from 300,000 in 1972 to 2.3 m[illion] today, the highest rate of incarceration in the world, overwhelmingly because of the war on drugs” (Wolf, 2011, para. 7). The Federation of American Scientists’ Drug Policy Analysis Bulletin (as cited in The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws [NORML], 2014) states that in the United States, arrests and prosecution for marijuana violations cost between $7.5 billion and $10 billion each year, and “90% of these VIEW DOCUMENT
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Drugs and its Offenders

2031 words - 8 pages offenses (Drug War Facts). The question then arises, is locking up drug offenders really efficient for society? I will use an economic approach to explain why nonviolent drug offenders should not be in prison and what can be done to lessen the crime that is associated with the drug trade. Many people argue that drugs cause violence and there is evidence that shows a positive correlation between drug use and violent and property crime (Miller and Levitt). However, one can argue that it is not the drugs that are causing the correlation, but the fact that they are illegal. Making something illegal raises the price of obtaining that good. This extra price includes the cost of consuming the VIEW DOCUMENT